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Whats going on with osem onion soup mix?
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Tamiri









  


Post  Thu, Sep 30 2010, 1:36 pm
I am positive my DS1 reacted to MSG. He was "tested" (kenisiology) for things such as flavored chips, back in the States and always came back "weak" after eating them. We saw his behavior go from 0-60 in just a few moments after eating things with MSG - of which we knew nothing at the time. So there is "something" in foods that contain MSG that causes an adverse reaction in some people. It could be the synthetic MSG only. But it's there. And I myself feel a "bite" when I eat food that has MSG, even if I don't know it's there. For example, in restaurants and hotels here in Israel, I generally cannot have soup because I know they put soup mix in to enhance the flavor. It's cheaper and far faster than making a good parve or fleishig stock. I know Chinese food gets a bad rap when it comes to MSG but it's not a problem since we don't generally eat Chinese.
HR, there is "something" in the MSG laden foods. And it's not a good something.
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aidelmaidel









  


Post  Mon, Oct 04 2010, 12:58 pm
HindaRochel wrote:
Tamiri wrote:
HindaRochel wrote:
A person needs glutamates. It is a neurotransmitter.

http://www.foodinsight.org/Res....._Glutamate
HR I think I know you better than that... you don't mean we need glutamates that occur in Osem soup mix, do you?


No, but I don't think one can be allergic to glutamates, and it appears that in general people are not allergic to MSG, but I would think rather the problem might be the source for the MSG. The reason I think this is important is because if there is a health issue one should be certain of the source.

Quote:
MSG is not an allergen, according to the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has found no evidence to suggest any long-term, serious health consequences from consuming MSG. It is possible that some people might be sensitive to MSG, just as to many other foods and food ingredients. There are some reports that mild, temporary reactions to MSG may occur in a small portion of the population, based on tests with a large dose of MSG in the absence of food.


Rather than avoiding MSG one should find the source of the problem and avoid that.


The MSG and glutamates in processed foods are all PROCESSED glutamates. They are not like the glutamates found naturally in foods (like tomatoes).

It's well known that many people with migraines (not all, but many) have migraines that are triggered by MSG. Albert Einstein Headache Center in NY tells their migraine patients to keep a headache diary and list what they ate. MSG is often involved.

Again, I am not an earthy-crunchy momma by any means, but I do think there is most definitely WAAAAAAAAAY more MSG and artificial glutamates in our diets then we need.

Just like you might be able to get calcium from chocolate bars, it might not be the best way to get calcium into our diets.

And my own personal experience with a child who is allergic/sensitive to MSG, it's made a world of difference since we took it out of our diets.
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TzenaRena









  


Post  Mon, Oct 04 2010, 1:28 pm
So that's why it takes me so long to cook anything, I could be using Osem Soup mix, and cutting my prep time in half, huh? Seriously, everything I make tastes good, at least my family thinks so Wink , and I never use the soup mixes. But I make the basmati rice, which is fragrant on it's own. Soup, I flavor with real vegetables! it's delicious. But I do put in lots of salt in most dishes.
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ra_mom









  


Post  Mon, Oct 04 2010, 1:45 pm
Tamiri wrote:
willow wrote:

I think it makes all food taste the same overall taste of soup mix. Its not bad but try cooking gourmet and let the food speak for itself you will be amazed. You will discover all these unused taste buds as herbs and varied spices wake up your food. It makes such a difference when cooking. Its beautiful Wink
Yes, exactly. The chemicals (I won't even say MSG) desensitize your taste buds so that food no longer tastes "good" unless it's loaded with salt and things such as soup mix. The food really doesn't taste "good". It tastes like soup mix, which is what people have accustomed themselves to. That in itself isn't so bad. The problem is what's in the mix. If it doesn't bother you, that's great. But if the food with soup mix tastes "good", you have a problem, IMO.
I agree with both of you.
The funny thing is that once I weaned myself off of soup mixes, I can't stand the taste of any dish that has even a bit of the stuff in it anymore. I can smell it from a mile away, and don't end up eating food prepared with it.
Start experimenting with other flavors ladies. Your food will be so good.
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andrea levy









  


Post  Mon, Oct 04 2010, 1:51 pm
dried onion, powder or bits, does pretty much the same thing without the msg or salt. works for me in cholent.
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Tamiri









  


Post  Mon, Oct 04 2010, 2:07 pm
ra_mom wrote:
I agree with both of you.
The funny thing is that once I weaned myself off of soup mixes, I can't stand the taste of any dish that has even a bit of the stuff in it anymore. I can smell it from a mile away, and don't end up eating food prepared with it.
Start experimenting with other flavors ladies. Your food will be so good.
If you haven't already done so, try weaning yourself from margarine and Rich's Whip. You won't be able to eat them after a while, either.
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DefyGravity









  


Post  Mon, Oct 04 2010, 2:20 pm
I use Goodman's Onion Soup mix.

I use lots of herbs and spices in my cooking, but sometimes nothing beats a good dose of MSG.
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ra_mom









  


Post  Mon, Oct 04 2010, 2:21 pm
Tamiri wrote:
ra_mom wrote:
I agree with both of you.
The funny thing is that once I weaned myself off of soup mixes, I can't stand the taste of any dish that has even a bit of the stuff in it anymore. I can smell it from a mile away, and don't end up eating food prepared with it.
Start experimenting with other flavors ladies. Your food will be so good.
If you haven't already done so, try weaning yourself from margarine and Rich's Whip. You won't be able to eat them after a while, either.
Thanks Tamiri!
I hardly use margarine. I actually stopped buying it recently, since it's made from soy and dd cannot tolerate it. I already have a whole list of margarine free baked goods recipes, so I really don't need it anyway.
As for Rich's whip, although we are not major dessert people, I cannot seem to stop using it when necessary, since I need to make dd dairy free and soy free ice cream, and BH sometimes I am able to find certain brands of whip that don't contain soy. The only other ice cream option for her is Rice Dream ice cream and she despises it (I do too!)
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ChossidMom









  


Post  Mon, Oct 04 2010, 2:29 pm
My husband can't stand it if I use any kind of soup mix.
When I make soup he always asks me if there are "chomarim" (chemicals) in it because if he tastes the minutest amount he won't eat it!
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sarachana









  


Post  Mon, Oct 04 2010, 4:09 pm
HindaRochel wrote:
MSG is derived from yeast. There are a few people who due react, reactions are short term and do not require treatment. People can be allergic to most anything (including water) though from one article I read it seemed that MSG was blamed when in fact other ingredients should have been blamed instead. Testing has not been able to isolate MSG as a source of the reactions commonly ascribed to it (headache etc) which doesn't mean it can't cause the reactions. In blind test studies those who claimed to react do not seem to react, which doesn't mean that no one will have a reaction, just that it is much less than people might think.

Overall health risks: minimal.

EVERY food has both health risks and consequences which differ from person to person and in fact can change over one's life. If a substance bothers a person they should try and avoid it, and of course one has a perfect right to avoid artificial sweetners (I do, I don't trust them personally...but many swear by them and suffer no ill effect) same for artificial food coloring etc etc.

All these products can produce negative side effects when in eaten in mass quantities. So can carrots. Or lettuce. Or water.


let's see here, Diet soda does not affect everyone the same, some not at all, DOES THAT MAKE IT OK??!!?
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ChossidMom









  


Post  Mon, Oct 04 2010, 4:14 pm
Yeah, I don't get it. I'm no saint when it comes to what I put in my mouth but at least I acknowledge that I am ingesting poison when I do it!!! This includes food coloring, artificial sweeteners, all flavorings, trans fats, hydrogenated fats, MSG and High Fructose Corn Syrup! Let's not be naive please.
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chocolate moose









  


Post  Mon, Oct 04 2010, 4:22 pm
We eat relatively healthfully, but I am not going to make a religion out of it. I keep that soup mix in the house.
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Barbara









  


Post  Mon, Oct 04 2010, 4:27 pm
ChossidMom wrote:
Yeah, I don't get it. I'm no saint when it comes to what I put in my mouth but at least I acknowledge that I am ingesting poison when I do it!!! This includes food coloring, artificial sweeteners, all flavorings, trans fats, hydrogenated fats, MSG and High Fructose Corn Syrup! Let's not be naive please.


Poison???? How about we not be melodramatic?

Or if we want to be melodramatic, can we scream about things like red meat (esp kosher red meat, with the residual sodium from kashering) and cheese as well? And make sure to chide people who allow their kids to use ketchup (which includes HFCS).

There are foods and additives that are less healthful than others, but that can still be consumed as part of an overall healthful diet. MODERATION is the answer.
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Zus









  


Post  Mon, Oct 04 2010, 4:30 pm
Nothing melodramatic about calling those things poison, let's be real.
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cubbie









  


Post  Mon, Oct 04 2010, 4:34 pm
aidelmaidel wrote:
I cannot consume MSG because it triggers migraines. And I have a child who has developed an allergy to it.

Once she was diagnosed, we started reading and found that really it's all the glutamates which are artificial flavor enhancers.

SOoooooo even if your soup mix says, "NO MSG" take a look at the label! Any of the listed below are also glutamates and can cause the same reactions as "MSG":

- autolyzed yeast
- hydrolyzed yeast
- tortulo yeast
- anytime you see "yeast" in a non-wheat product (ie on flavored popcorn, chips, etc).
- "artificial flavors"
- anything produced overseas that says "spices" or "flavors" can contain glutamates

Start looking at your processed products and you'll find lots of glutamates.

A VERY EASY SUBSTITUTE for Onion soup mix is either dried minced onion or onion powder and copious amounts of salt.


My father gets severe migranes from MSG I've seen this since I was very young, the slightest amount and he's in a dark room for 3 days - he does NOT react in the slightest from the MSG free.
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ChossidMom









  


Post  Mon, Oct 04 2010, 5:23 pm
Barbara wrote:


Poison???? How about we not be melodramatic?

...
There are foods and additives that are less healthful than others, but that can still be consumed as part of an overall healthful diet. MODERATION is the answer.


According to Dr. Robert Lustig, MD, UCSF Professor of Pediatrics in the Division of Endocrinology High Fructose Corn Syrup is POISON. Watch his lecture about Sugar and HFCS, especially if you're curious as to why it is added to almost every processed food in the U.S.A:

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Barbara









  


Post  Mon, Oct 04 2010, 5:46 pm
We can ALL cut and paste. WOW!

By James Kreiger:

And see also http://www.alanaragonblog.com/.....alarmism/, explaining the flaws in Lustig's arguments, and summarizing a debate with Lustig)

Quote:


Is High Fructose Corn Syrup Worse Than Regular Sugar?

A recent study out of Princeton University has the high-fructose corn syrup alarmists out in full force. This study compared the effects of high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) to regular table sugar (sucrose), looking at their effects on body weight, body fat, and triglycerides (fats that float around in your blood). The study found that the rats fed HFCS gained more weight and abdominal fat than the rats fed sucrose. This study has strengthened the belief of some people that HFCS is contributing to obesity in our society, and that it is worse than regular sugar. But is it really?

To answer this question, we need to take a close look at this study. The researchers performed 2 experiments. In the first experiment, male rats were divided into 4 groups. Group 1 (the control group) was fed a regular diet. Group 2 was fed the same diet, with the addition of 24-hour access to water sweetened with HFCS. Group 3 had the regular diet with 12-hour access to the HFCS-sweetened water. Group 4 had the regular diet, with 12-hour access to sucrose-sweetened water. The rats were tracked for 8 weeks; weight was measured, along with food, sucrose, and HFCS intake.

You can see the results for experiment 1 in the following chart:

The rats who got HFCS for 12 hours gained significantly more weight than the other 3 groups. At first glance, this would make you believe that HFCS makes you gain more weight than sucrose, even if you are eating the same number of calories. However, there is a problem with these results. Take a look again at the chart above. If the rats fed HFCS for 12 hours gained more weight, why didn’t the rats fed HFCS for 24 hours also gain more weight? They got HFCS for a full 12 hours more, yet didn’t gain more weight. This is a glaring inconsistency in the results…an inconsistency that the researchers never tried to explain.

Rather than some unique effect of HFCS, a more likely explanation is one of chance. Put on your math hat, because we need to talk about some statistics. Researchers use statistics to get an idea of the probability that their results are due to chance. When the scientists run their stats, they get what is known as a P value. The P value tells you the probability that the results are not due to chance. Usually, if the P value is less than 0.05, a scientist will call the results “significant.” In other words, if you did the experiment 100 times, you would only see these results less than 5 times if there wasn’t a true effect.

The above only holds true if you’re doing a single comparison. If you start comparing a bunch of groups all to each other, the probability of a fluke result dramatically increases. The Princeton study is a perfect example. There are 4 groups all being compared to each other. That makes for 6 total comparisons (group 1 to group 2, 1 to 3, 1 to 4, 2 to 3, 2 to 4, and 3 to 4). Each one of these comparisons is being tested against that 5% level. To calculate the probability of a fluke result in this case, we calculate 1 – (0.95×0.95×0.95×0.95×0.95×0.95) = 26%. In other words, there is a 1 in 4 chance that the greater weight gain in the HFCS-fed rats is a fluke. I don’t know about you, but I wouldn’t put too much faith in results that have a 1 in 4 chance of being wrong. There are ways that scientists can adjust for this, but the Princeton researchers didn’t appear to make those adjustments. Thus, it is not surprising that there was a significant result observed in 1 out of the 4 groups…you would expect this to happen based on random chance alone.

In Experiment 2, the researchers divided male rats into 3 groups: 12-hour HFCS, 24-hour HFCS, and control. They tracked the rats for 6 months. Both HFCS-fed groups gained more weight and fat than the control, and also had higher triglycerides. However, the researchers didn’t compare HFCS to sucrose in this group, so this experiment doesn’t’ say anything about whether HFCS is any worse than sucrose. The researchers also didn’t say anything about food intake and whether the HFCS-fed rats ate more than the control rats.

Experiment 2 also featured female rats on one of the 4 diets used in Experiment 1. These rats were tracked for 7 months. The following chart shows the results of the experiment:

The female rats fed HFCS for 24 hours a day gained significantly more weight than the other groups. Now compare these results to the chart for Experiment 1 earlier. Do you see the disparity? In Experiment 1, the rats fed HFCS for 12 hours per day gained the most weight. However, in Experiment 2, the rats fed HFCS for 24 hours per day gained the most weight, and the female rats fed HFCS for 12 hours didn’t gain any more weight than the other groups. Why did the 12-hour group gain the most weight in one experiment, but the 24-hour group gain the most weight in a nearly identical experiment? This is a glaring contradiction in the results, and a problem which the researchers did not discuss. We also have the same statistical problem that we did with Experiment 1. Since there are 6 comparisons, there is a 1 in 4 chance that the results are wrong (and ironically, we have 1 out of the 4 groups showing a significant result). In fact, when we take both experiments combined, we have at least a 50% chance that the results of one of the experiments are wrong. Out of all the comparisons being made, we would expect to see a couple groups show a significant result based on random chance…and that’s exactly what happened in this study.

The bottom line is that there is no valid reason for HFCS to be any different than sucrose in the way that it affects your body. They are both nearly identical in their composition, containing roughly half fructose and half glucose. They are both nearly identical in the way they are metabolized by your body. There is no practical difference between the two as far as your body is concerned. Now, I’m not saying that you should go out and consume all the HFCS that you want. The point is that there is nothing uniquely “bad” about HFCS compared to regular sugar. HFCS is not uniquely responsible for weight gain as some people would have you believe.

If you see a product with HFCS and a similar product with natural table sugar, don’t assume the product with natural sugar is any better. Rather than worrying about whether something contains HFCS, you should strive to reduce your intake of all types of added sugar and refined carbohydrates in your diet. It is much more important to look at the big picture; keep your physical activity high, manage your overall food intake, make sure most of your food is from minimally refined sources, and keep your protein intake high. This is what will help you lose weight and keep it off, rather than singling out HFCS in your diet. Don’t let the fructose fear-mongerers fool you.


Now, personally, I prefer sugar to HFCS, simply because I prefer less processed products. But its not *poison*
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ChossidMom









  


Post  Mon, Oct 04 2010, 5:55 pm
Barbara wrote:
We can ALL cut and paste. WOW!




This is just plain nasty.
It's comments like these that basically make me not want to post in threads where you post.

Have fun.
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DefyGravity









  


Post  Mon, Oct 04 2010, 5:59 pm
I was never nervous about eating food containing high fructose corn syrup until "They" started running pro-HFCS commercials on TV. Now I'm kind of wary about consuming too much of it.
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Barbara









  


Post  Mon, Oct 04 2010, 6:12 pm
ChossidMom wrote:
Barbara wrote:
We can ALL cut and paste. WOW!




This is just plain nasty.
It's comments like these that basically make me not want to post in threads where you post.

Have fun.


I'm sorry if you consider it nasty. But I'm not about to watch a video of over an hour in length because someone wants to make a point without bothering to review and synthesize material, or at least find an article that reviews and synthesizes the material. Or to mention how controversial the people whose videos they post are. (Mercola, of course, is particularly controversial, and considered by some to be an outright quack. He has been sanctioned by the FDA on several occasions for making unfounded claims regarding products he sells. Lustig is far less controversial, although his conclusions on this issue are.)

I'm also just plain tired of histrionics. MSG is not strychnine. HFCS is not rat poison. They may be foods that are best consumed in small quantities -- in fact, we limit our intake of *all* sugars, including HFCS -- but calling them *poison* makes you lose all credibility with me.
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