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Cbk









  


Post  Mon, Dec 05 2016, 9:22 pm
Anybody have a recipe for a bourbon sauce that goes well with short ribs I recently had bourbon braised beef short ribs in a restaurant and it was amazing.
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chaya35









  


Post  Mon, Dec 05 2016, 9:35 pm
T Fushions shorts ribs are delicious. I think their recipe is in Secret Restaurant Recipes cookbook. I never made their recipe but had it in their restaurant.
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Amarante









  


Post  Mon, Dec 05 2016, 9:36 pm
Boozy enough for you? LOL There are much easier versions of course if you don't like to potchke but this one really isn't difficult once you've assembled the ingredients. Marinating in the liquor would intensify the flavor. And any braised meat dish is better the next day especially since it makes it easier to defat the liquid.

Delmonico's Bourbon Glazed Short Ribs with Horseradish & Caramelized Vegetables

Serves 6

Ingredients

1 pint Kentucky Bourbon Barrel Stout*– or other dark beer
2 cups Woodford Reserve Bourbon
2 cups Lairds* Straight Apple Brandy
2 bay leaves
2 tablespoons whole black peppercorns
1 bunch whole sprigs parsley, thyme and rosemary stems, tied
12 ea 4" bone-in beef short ribs, trimmed
Kosher salt
Freshly ground black pepper
1 cup wondra® Flour
2 tablespoons olive oil
4 stalks celery, diced
3 carrots, peeled & diced
1 onion, peeled & diced
2 cloves garlic, minced
1/4 cup tomato paste
1 quart veal stock (sub chicken stock if unavailable)
1/4 cup chopped parsley
3 tablespoons chopped thyme
1 tablespoon chopped rosemary
5 large shallots, thinly sliced
2 tablespoons brown sugar
2 tablespoons soft butter (sub margarine)
1/4 cup prepared horseradish

Caramelized Root Vegetables


Preparation

Combine the beer, 1 cup of the bourbon, 1 cup of the brandy, the bay leaves, peppercorns & herb stems in a gallon sized zip top bag, add the short ribs and marinate overnight. Remove the ribs from the marinade, reserve the marinade.

Pat the short ribs dry, season with salt and pepper and dust on all sides with the Wondra®.
Heat oven to 375°F

Heat a large, straight sided sauté pan over high heat, add 1 tablespoon of the olive oil, swirl to coat the pan and add the short ribs, working in batches as needed, and cook until nicely browned on all sides, about 8 minutes. Remove the ribs to a plate and pour off any excess fat from the pot. Add the remaining tablespoon of olive oil and swirl to coat the pan. Add the onions, celery, carrots and garlic, stir occasionally and sauté until nicely browned, about 5 minutes. Add the tomato paste, reduce the heat to medium and cook until caramelized, about 10 minutes. Add the reserved marinade, increase the heat to high and reduce by half, about 15 minutes. Add the veal stock and the short ribs, and bring to a boil.

Place the lid on the pan, transfer to the oven and braise for 1 1/2 hours. Carefully remove the pan and check for doneness, you want the shortribs to be falling off the bone tender. If they're done, remove from the oven, if they're not tender yet, continue braising, checking every 30 minutes until tender.

Remove from the oven, stir in the parsley, thyme and rosemary, replace the lid and allow to cool for 30 minutes. Transfer the ribs to a plate and strain and reserve the braising liquid, discarding the vegetables. Return the braising liquid to the pan and bring to a simmer, skimming the fat and impurities from the sauce. Add the shallots and the remaining 1 cup brandy, 1 cup bourbon, and the brown sugar, bring to a boil and reduce until starting to thicken, about 10 minutes.

Remove from the heat, stir in the horseradish and swirl in the butter until melted. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Serve with the caramelized vegetables and garnish with fresh herbs.

Carmelized Root Vegetables - roasted root vegetables work but if you want to make these specifically, sub margarine for the butter).

1 tablespoon olive oil
1 tablespoon canola oil
4 tablespoons soft butter
12 small baby white turnips, peeled, quartered and blanched
2 celery roots, peeled, diced and blanched
2 medium rutabaga’s, peeled, diced and blanched
12 cippolini or pearl onions, blanched and peeled
1 cup chicken broth
1/4 cup chopped herbs ( parsley, thyme, sage, rosemary)

Heat a sauté pan, over medium high heat, add the oil and swirl, add the butter and swirl to melt. When the foam subsides, add the turnips, celery root, rutabagas and onions, and cook, tossing occasionally, until they start to caramelize, about 8 minutes. Season with salt & pepper, add the chicken broth, bring all to a simmer, and cook until the broth is absorbed, about 5 minutes. Finish the vegetables with the chopped herbs and season with additional salt and pepper as needed.
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Cbk









  


Post  Tue, Dec 06 2016, 12:01 pm
Wow that really is a long recipe but thanks for the response I think I'll try the first one from T fusion and see how it come out
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chaya35









  


Post  Tue, Dec 06 2016, 8:25 pm
Cbk wrote:
Wow that really is a long recipe but thanks for the response I think I'll try the first one from T fusion and see how it come out


Let me know how it comes out. I always wanted to make it.
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ally









  


Post  Mon, Dec 12 2016, 12:27 pm
Amarante wrote:
Boozy enough for you? LOL There are much easier versions of course if you don't like to potchke but this one really isn't difficult once you've assembled the ingredients. Marinating in the liquor would intensify the flavor. And any braised meat dish is better the next day especially since it makes it easier to defat the liquid.

Delmonico's Bourbon Glazed Short Ribs with Horseradish & Caramelized Vegetables

Serves 6

Ingredients

1 pint Kentucky Bourbon Barrel Stout*– or other dark beer
2 cups Woodford Reserve Bourbon
2 cups Lairds* Straight Apple Brandy
2 bay leaves
2 tablespoons whole black peppercorns
1 bunch whole sprigs parsley, thyme and rosemary stems, tied
12 ea 4" bone-in beef short ribs, trimmed
Kosher salt
Freshly ground black pepper
1 cup wondra® Flour
2 tablespoons olive oil
4 stalks celery, diced
3 carrots, peeled & diced
1 onion, peeled & diced
2 cloves garlic, minced
1/4 cup tomato paste
1 quart veal stock (sub chicken stock if unavailable)
1/4 cup chopped parsley
3 tablespoons chopped thyme
1 tablespoon chopped rosemary
5 large shallots, thinly sliced
2 tablespoons brown sugar
2 tablespoons soft butter (sub margarine)
1/4 cup prepared horseradish

Caramelized Root Vegetables


Preparation

Combine the beer, 1 cup of the bourbon, 1 cup of the brandy, the bay leaves, peppercorns & herb stems in a gallon sized zip top bag, add the short ribs and marinate overnight. Remove the ribs from the marinade, reserve the marinade.

Pat the short ribs dry, season with salt and pepper and dust on all sides with the Wondra®.
Heat oven to 375°F

Heat a large, straight sided sauté pan over high heat, add 1 tablespoon of the olive oil, swirl to coat the pan and add the short ribs, working in batches as needed, and cook until nicely browned on all sides, about 8 minutes. Remove the ribs to a plate and pour off any excess fat from the pot. Add the remaining tablespoon of olive oil and swirl to coat the pan. Add the onions, celery, carrots and garlic, stir occasionally and sauté until nicely browned, about 5 minutes. Add the tomato paste, reduce the heat to medium and cook until caramelized, about 10 minutes. Add the reserved marinade, increase the heat to high and reduce by half, about 15 minutes. Add the veal stock and the short ribs, and bring to a boil.

Place the lid on the pan, transfer to the oven and braise for 1 1/2 hours. Carefully remove the pan and check for doneness, you want the shortribs to be falling off the bone tender. If they're done, remove from the oven, if they're not tender yet, continue braising, checking every 30 minutes until tender.

Remove from the oven, stir in the parsley, thyme and rosemary, replace the lid and allow to cool for 30 minutes. Transfer the ribs to a plate and strain and reserve the braising liquid, discarding the vegetables. Return the braising liquid to the pan and bring to a simmer, skimming the fat and impurities from the sauce. Add the shallots and the remaining 1 cup brandy, 1 cup bourbon, and the brown sugar, bring to a boil and reduce until starting to thicken, about 10 minutes.

Remove from the heat, stir in the horseradish and swirl in the butter until melted. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Serve with the caramelized vegetables and garnish with fresh herbs.

Carmelized Root Vegetables - roasted root vegetables work but if you want to make these specifically, sub margarine for the butter).

1 tablespoon olive oil
1 tablespoon canola oil
4 tablespoons soft butter
12 small baby white turnips, peeled, quartered and blanched
2 celery roots, peeled, diced and blanched
2 medium rutabaga’s, peeled, diced and blanched
12 cippolini or pearl onions, blanched and peeled
1 cup chicken broth
1/4 cup chopped herbs ( parsley, thyme, sage, rosemary)

Heat a sauté pan, over medium high heat, add the oil and swirl, add the butter and swirl to melt. When the foam subsides, add the turnips, celery root, rutabagas and onions, and cook, tossing occasionally, until they start to caramelize, about 8 minutes. Season with salt & pepper, add the chicken broth, bring all to a simmer, and cook until the broth is absorbed, about 5 minutes. Finish the vegetables with the chopped herbs and season with additional salt and pepper as needed.


Im so tempted. Is this good enough to justify the expense?
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Amarante









  


Post  Mon, Dec 12 2016, 1:02 pm
ally wrote:
Im so tempted. Is this good enough to justify the expense?


Short ribs are expensive whatever recipe you use so the only pricey variant would be the booze. I got my bourbon at TJ and it wasn't expensive - any dark beer would work (again I got mine from TJ). I also found a cheap Apple brandy but honestly if you couldn't find an inexpensive version, you could use Martinelli or other good apple cider. I wouldn't use straight apple juice because I think that would be too sweet.

Think of it this way - the amount of liquor you would be using would be less than if six drinkers were drinking it from a glass. Laughing Laughing

Booze really does make braised stuff taste so delicious. I have a chile recipe that uses Merlot wine and it elevates the flavor so much. Once I made that chile, I never looked for another version. Very Happy

The recipe really isn't a potchke. It just looks that way because of the list of ingredients. But once you gather the ingredients, it's your standard easy braise recipe - sear meat - take out meat - saute the savories - add back the meat and rest of ingredients and let cook at a long slow temperature so that the collagen in the meat dissolves and makes a tender meat and a succulent sauce.
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ally









  


Post  Mon, Dec 12 2016, 1:17 pm
Amarante wrote:
Short ribs are expensive whatever recipe you use so the only pricey variant would be the booze. I got my bourbon at TJ and it wasn't expensive - any dark beer would work (again I got mine from TJ). I also found a cheap Apple brandy but honestly if you couldn't find an inexpensive version, you could use Martinelli or other good apple cider. I wouldn't use straight apple juice because I think that would be too sweet.

Think of it this way - the amount of liquor you would be using would be less than if six drinkers were drinking it from a glass. Laughing Laughing

Booze really does make braised stuff taste so delicious. I have a chile recipe that uses Merlot wine and it elevates the flavor so much. Once I made that chile, I never looked for another version. Very Happy

The recipe really isn't a potchke. It just looks that way because of the list of ingredients. But once you gather the ingredients, it's your standard easy braise recipe - sear meat - take out meat - saute the savories - add back the meat and rest of ingredients and let cook at a long slow temperature so that the collagen in the meat dissolves and makes a tender meat and a succulent sauce.


I have the short ribs..I usually do them in Guinness.
But I think u convinced me.
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Amarante









  


Post  Mon, Dec 12 2016, 1:21 pm
ally wrote:
I have the short ribs..I usually do them in Guinness.
But I think u convinced me.


If you are already using Guiness, the only additional expense would be the bourbon and apple brandy and you can probably find a low class brand since you don't need the best sipping stuff. Laughing

Once I had a recipe for a cake that called for Calvados and I had NO IDEA how much that was going to cost me. But I was in a desperate situation because I was shopping for everything and I didn't have time to think of an alternative and get new ingredients. I wish the liquor store owner had suggested alternatives that were cheaper because Calvados is the best apple brandy liquore on the market. And no I did NOT use it for this recipe. Laughing Laughing
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ally









  


Post  Mon, Dec 12 2016, 2:04 pm
Amarante wrote:
If you are already using Guiness, the only additional expense would be the bourbon and apple brandy and you can probably find a low class brand since you don't need the best sipping stuff. Laughing

Once I had a recipe for a cake that called for Calvados and I had NO IDEA how much that was going to cost me. But I was in a desperate situation because I was shopping for everything and I didn't have time to think of an alternative and get new ingredients. I wish the liquor store owner had suggested alternatives that were cheaper because Calvados is the best apple brandy liquore on the market. And no I did NOT use it for this recipe. Laughing Laughing


I am just picturing the look on my husbands face when he sees the half empty bottle of bourbon...used for cooking! Blasphemy.
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Amarante









  


Post  Mon, Dec 12 2016, 2:05 pm
ally wrote:
I am just picturing the look on my husbands face when he sees the half empty bottle of bourbon...used for cooking! Blasphemy.


And I see the blasphemy of using good cooking ingredients to drink. Laughing Laughing
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ally









  


Post  Thu, Dec 15 2016, 10:33 pm
Marinating Shocked
Do you think I can use fresh horseradish in the sauce?
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Amarante









  


Post  Thu, Dec 15 2016, 10:40 pm
ally wrote:
Marinating Shocked
Do you think I can use fresh horseradish in the sauce?


I don't think so because prepared horseradish has some vinegar in it.

http://toriavey.com/how-to/201.....sh-3-ways/

"It doesn't take much to make fresh horseradish. Be careful, because this is hot!"

Ingredients

1 cup peeled and cubed horseradish root
3/4 cup white vinegar
2 teaspoons white sugar
1/4 teaspoon salt

Directions
In an electric food processor or blender, process horseradish root, vinegar, sugar and salt. Carefully remove the cover of the processor or blender, keeping your face away from the container. Cover and store the horseradish in the refrigerator.
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ally









  


Post  Wed, Jan 04 2017, 9:54 am
Just remembered I forgot to report back. The ribs were delicious. I didn't quite get the sauce right - I think I didn't have enough juices to balance the alcohol. But then I added too much stock and the taste was too reduced. Was still very good though.
(As I predicted, my husband struggled seeing the half empty bottles of alcohol).
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