Home

Social work program through TTI /Roberts Wesleyan College
1, 2, 3  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Forum -> Working Women

Report offensive ad

View latest: 24h 48h 72h


amother




Beige


Post  Wed, May 17 2017, 10:55 pm
Is anyone familiar with this program or college? I would love to get some feedback before applying.
Please share whatever you know, TIA!
Back to top

amother




Beige


Post  Thu, May 18 2017, 8:17 am
Bump?
Back to top

amother




Burgundy


Post  Thu, May 18 2017, 9:13 am
What do you want to know? I heard it's a great program and people are very happy with it, I know someone who went.
Back to top

amother




Beige


Post  Thu, May 18 2017, 11:51 am
Thank you, I'm glad to hear it's a good program.

I basically want to know how much homework there is compared to other programs. Being that the classes are only once a week, I was wondering if there is a lot more homework because of that.

I have also never heard of this college before, and want to know how accredited they are.

If u have any info to share, I would appreciate that. Thank you!
Back to top

amother




Burgundy


Post  Thu, May 18 2017, 2:36 pm
It sounds like it's just as accredited and rigorous as any other program. Why don't you call TTI? They can probably answer your questions.
Back to top

amother




Beige


Post  Thu, May 18 2017, 2:37 pm
Being that it's their program, they are likely to say only how great everything is.... I'd love to hear from a neutral party.
Back to top

amother




Burgundy


Post  Thu, May 18 2017, 2:40 pm
amother wrote:
Being that it's their program, they are likely to say only how great everything is.... I'd love to hear from a neutral party.

I can only tell you what I heard...as far as specific questions like how much HW, etc I think it's a good idea to call them, it's more of a factual question than just asking how great it is, no?
Back to top

amother




Beige


Post  Thu, May 18 2017, 2:49 pm
amother wrote:
I can only tell you what I heard...as far as specific questions like how much HW, etc I think it's a good idea to call them, it's more of a factual question than just asking how great it is, no?


No, because they are not going to tell me "hey, we give loads of homework and make you work till your bones.."

I appreciate your input though.
Back to top

amother




Burgundy


Post  Thu, May 18 2017, 2:51 pm
amother wrote:
No, because they are not going to tell me "hey, we give loads of homework and make you work till your bones.."

I appreciate your input though.

OK, hatzlacha! Hope it goes well, whatever you decide to do.
Back to top

amother




Black


Post  Thu, May 18 2017, 2:56 pm
It's TTI - it's not a serious degree.
Back to top

mom24.7









  


Post  Thu, May 18 2017, 3:11 pm
Black another why do you say so? I have been through tti recently. We were worked to the bone just like any other college. Maybe even more since its a shorter more intense program. They have changed over the years and the work is equal to other colleges.
Back to top

amother




Wine


Post  Thu, May 18 2017, 3:14 pm
amother wrote:
It's TTI - it's not a serious degree.

What makes a degree "not serious"?
Back to top

amother




Black


Post  Thu, May 18 2017, 3:49 pm
I am very familiar with TTI, have tutored many people through their programs over the years and it's a complete joke. I would never even consider hiring someone who went to school there.
Back to top

amother




Burgundy


Post  Thu, May 18 2017, 5:09 pm
amother wrote:
I am very familiar with TTI, have tutored many people through their programs over the years and it's a complete joke. I would never even consider hiring someone who went to school there.

That's not at all what I've heard. I hear from lots of employers, just in the education field alone, that they are desperate for TTI graduates. In what field do you hire people?
Back to top

seeker









  


Post  Thu, May 18 2017, 8:18 pm
With all the amothers going around here, I find it hard to take anything in this thread seriously... so I'm using my name here even though I wasn't really sure I wanted to.

I don't know anything about any social work programs, TTI or otherwise. But I do know about grad schools in general, and I know a little about TTI's special ed masters because that's my field. I also know some of the people in the general TTI administration so I can share a bit about how they work. So here goes, and take it all with the grain of salt that, again, I don't know social work.

1: Regarding asking questions about homework - in general schools are not going to lie about their workloads. They want the right students the same way that students want the right schools. I have never seen a school misrepresent their requirements and expectations. (Though it's interesting that on one hand you seem to be hoping that you can go to class once a week and not have much homework, while on the other hand worrying that the caliber of the program is not high enough. Hmmmm.)

2: Likewise, accreditation: That's not something they could lie about even if they wanted to. Either you're accredited or not. It's not something subjective like having a good reputation - it means that the degree is accepted by things like licensing boards or whatever applies in your field. It's a straightforward question with only one direct answer that could best be answered by the people who run the program.

3: Regarding whether the school is "serious" - I graduated a while ago, and so did most of my peers and colleagues. So I can't say for sure whether or not anything has changed. But my impression was that those who went in with a good ethic and desire to learn, learned whatever they needed and wanted to and came out well equipped for their profession. Those who treated it like a quick excuse and only put in the minimum effort required to pass, will probably be easily weeded out in the job market. I know a couple of people who graduated from there, they were serious about it from the outset, and came out as seriously qualified teachers. One even teaches my own child and I am extremely happy with her. I knew a couple of the professors in the special ed masters program (they no longer teach there, simply moved on to other things) and they were excellent teachers. I subbed for one at one point and found that, as I started saying before, the students were mixed - there were students who looked like they cared about becoming special ed teachers and doing a good job, who looked prepared for class, took notes and asked relevant questions, and participated fully in the activities. And there were students who had their phones out under the desk most of the time, did not seem very attentive, and I'm not sure whether they have any actual aspirations in life or were just there because they think they should have a degree and someone told them this was the quickest and easiest way, or they qualified for a scholarship somehow, or something.

4: A final note - I don't know everything about every program, but I do know a couple of the people quite high in the administration. They are solid, erlich people of integrity. They don't seem at all like sharks who are just trying to charge people money to churn out worthless degrees. Rather it seems much more like they're trying to provide a service - they know people want to get degrees, in a frum setting, on a convenient schedule, in a quicker timeframe, and they created a program to make that possible. And then when people wanted different degrees they created more programs. If you want to apply yourself to the work, then you'll have better results. The programs are there and you go where you will with them.

Again, that's just my impression and I have not actually been through TTI's programs myself, except to the extent that I got an inside view during that short-term subbing stint.

OP, good luck with your decision.
Back to top

amother




Oak


Post  Fri, May 19 2017, 12:48 am
I am anon as I don't want to out my field of practice....not SW but similar field and I work with MSWs.

Don't waste your time with TTI. I know people who did their programs and you don't get the same experience as real programs- especially SW where classroom interaction is vital. It's not like a literature or math degree where self study might be fine. But my MA program met multiple days a week plus had hours of "homework"- reading, papers, projects etc.
I am against online degrees in things like psychology or SW. No way you get the same experience or education!!
And I would think twice before I hire anyone from a distance learning or similar type of an institution.
Back to top

seeker









  


Post  Fri, May 19 2017, 1:08 am
TTI is not online or distance learning at the master's level. I believe a lot of the bachelor's level is independent study with the objective of getting to the master's more quickly. Then the master's is live classes.

Since I don't know anything about social work degrees and training, I can only hope that experience is part of the requirement for accreditation.

Again, I don't know the specifics and it's possible that TTI is not as rigorous as other social work programs. I don't know either way, maybe it is. I just felt the need to clarify that it is not an online or self-study degree. I agree, I would not want to work with a social worker who got a degree from an online papermill. I could see a combination working - more self-study in technicalities and theory, and then live classes in more practical areas. I certainly had classes in my education degree that could have been done a LOT more quickly and efficiently with more self-study - which isn't for everyone because not everyone can process information that way, but if you could then why should you sit in classes listening to someone talk about the history of ADA and IDEA and NCLB when these are things you could read twice as fast? I took philosophy of education and a couple of others as an online course and boy am I glad I didn't have to spend 3 hours a week on it. I don't think it made me a worse teacher. The online forum discussions in the philosophy class were pretty interesting, it wasn't a cop-out, it was just a learning format that worked better for my style and my schedule. Tsk, tsk, I guess my degree wasn't real enough.
Back to top

amother




Oak


Post  Fri, May 19 2017, 1:39 am
seeker wrote:
TTI is not online or distance learning at the master's level. I believe a lot of the bachelor's level is independent study with the objective of getting to the master's more quickly. Then the master's is live classes.

Since I don't know anything about social work degrees and training, I can only hope that experience is part of the requirement for accreditation.

Again, I don't know the specifics and it's possible that TTI is not as rigorous as other social work programs. I don't know either way, maybe it is. I just felt the need to clarify that it is not an online or self-study degree. I agree, I would not want to work with a social worker who got a degree from an online papermill. I could see a combination working - more self-study in technicalities and theory, and then live classes in more practical areas. I certainly had classes in my education degree that could have been done a LOT more quickly and efficiently with more self-study - which isn't for everyone because not everyone can process information that way, but if you could then why should you sit in classes listening to someone talk about the history of ADA and IDEA and NCLB when these are things you could read twice as fast? I took philosophy of education and a couple of others as an online course and boy am I glad I didn't have to spend 3 hours a week on it. I don't think it made me a worse teacher. The online forum discussions in the philosophy class were pretty interesting, it wasn't a cop-out, it was just a learning format that worked better for my style and my schedule. Tsk, tsk, I guess my degree wasn't real enough.


In my program when we had theory classes it was all brought towards the practical. We were expected to read the books on our own and come to class with the history/basic philosophy known. Then we would discuss, analyze, ask questions, do role plays on scenarios relating to the topic- way more in depth than the few online courses I took through a different program later on to fulfil a different states requirements. We had discussion groups online but it was minute and just touched the surface compared to classroom discussions with live teachers moderating it. I have met students who have done online degrees in these fields and they don't know that much comparatively...
If you just had plain history classes then why not have online courses? But my program was not geared like that and I would be shocked if a MSW program had enough that is abstract to allow for such a format especially beyond first semester.
Back to top

amother




Burgundy


Post  Fri, May 19 2017, 8:26 am
Like I said, I know someone who did the TTI Social Work program. It is in class. She loved the classes, she said they were amazing. She said the teachers are great and her classmates were all frum women with the right perspective.

I don't know about homework but yes, it sounds like you have to work hard. But she said it's totally doable because it's Sundays and they work within a typical frum woman's schedule.

She also said they don't have the pitfall of other SW programs, where they give over anti-Torah perspectives. It sounds like a quality program where they keep a high priority on doing the right thing.
Back to top

amother




Burgundy


Post  Fri, May 19 2017, 8:32 am
amother wrote:

Don't waste your time with TTI. I know people who did their programs and you don't get the same experience as real programs- especially SW where classroom interaction is vital. It's not like a literature or math degree where self study might be fine. But my MA program met multiple days a week plus had hours of "homework"- reading, papers, projects etc.
I am against online degrees in things like psychology or SW. No way you get the same experience or education!!
And I would think twice before I hire anyone from a distance learning or similar type of an institution.

Again, it's not an online degree. The MSW is a regular, in-class program.

All of their Masters degrees are in-class. I'm honestly surprised, I thought everyone knew that.
Back to top
1, 2, 3  Next Recent Topics

Page 1 of 3 View latest: 24h 48h 72h


Post new topic   Reply to topic    Forum -> Working Women

Similar Topics Replies Last Post
Brooklyn College for Social work?
by amother
5 Sat, Dec 21 2013, 11:04 pm View last post
college for masters in social work 11 Mon, Aug 13 2012, 6:06 pm View last post
can you offer some advice re: a college for social work degr 1 Thu, Dec 16 2010, 8:05 am View last post
Spinoff of TTI - Community College or Online?
by amother
9 Thu, Aug 28 2014, 8:19 pm View last post
TTI OT program
by amother
10 Mon, Apr 03 2017, 7:48 pm View last post

Jump to:  





Report offensive ad