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Does being a puzzle 'expert' carry over to other areas?

 
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amother




Burgundy


Post  Sun, Feb 11 2018, 10:36 pm
does it mean more bright or 'geshikt'? I know it doesn't mean higher iq, but curious if will help in other areas?
4yo does puzzles on 6yo level, picks out a piece and immediately figures our where to put it.
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Boca00









  


Post  Sun, Feb 11 2018, 11:01 pm
I'm not sure what it means, but I do know this-
having a mother that believes in you will take you further than being bright will.
Your kid is already off to a good start!
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yksraya









  


Post  Sun, Feb 11 2018, 11:20 pm
May she always figure how to put the puzzle pcs of life together.

Maybe it does mean she is good with finding solutions, Problem solving...
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Jewishfoodie









  


Post  Sun, Feb 11 2018, 11:31 pm
Math. And problem solving. One day she will be a math genius iyH!
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amother




Cyan


Post  Sun, Feb 11 2018, 11:59 pm
Visual perception
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amother




Plum


Post  Mon, Feb 12 2018, 2:35 am
Maybe, maybe not.

My DD is now a young adult. She was excellent with puzzles and concentration games from a very young age but has a below average IQ and was not successful in school. She still enjoys puzzles and completes them at lightning speed. She also has excellent visual perception.
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salt









  


Post  Mon, Feb 12 2018, 2:42 am
amother wrote:
Visual perception


This is what my DD's ganenet told me. She said being able to fit puzzle pieces together at pre-school age helps with learning to read when they get to school.
So maybe your kid will pick up reading quickly.
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amother




Olive


Post  Mon, Feb 12 2018, 7:36 am
I have one child that is also a master at puzzles. That child picked up reading quicker than any of their classmates. (Although child has difficulties in other areas.)
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Bizzydizzymommy









  


Post  Mon, Feb 12 2018, 7:41 am
amother wrote:
I have one child that is also a master at puzzles. That child picked up reading quicker than any of their classmates. (Although child has difficulties in other areas.)

I agree , my preschool puzzle experts all ended up being bookworms. They are also very artistic. Math is actually their weakest subject. They all take after me Smile
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amother




Denim


Post  Mon, Feb 12 2018, 7:46 am
Jewishfoodie wrote:
Math. And problem solving. One day she will be a math genius iyH!


This, problem solving and math skills.
Look up Gardener Theories of Intelligences and see if how he describes a mathematical person. We all have a little of all intelligences but there is always one area that we excel in.
BTW- according to his theory mathematical people are also musical.
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freedomseek









  


Post  Mon, Feb 12 2018, 9:03 am
Puzzles is many times an art. She might have a great eye for color
That’s how I do my puzzles real well
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amother




Olive


Post  Mon, Feb 12 2018, 9:10 am
amother wrote:
This, problem solving and math skills.
Look up Gardener Theories of Intelligences and see if how he describes a mathematical person. We all have a little of all intelligences but there is always one area that we excel in.
BTW- according to his theory mathematical people are also musical.


My child is abnormally musical as well.
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fmt4









  


Post  Mon, Feb 12 2018, 9:14 am
My oldest son was amazing at puzzles. He does well in school bh, but nothing amazing. He is very good at memorization and reading comprehension.
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amother




Emerald


Post  Mon, Feb 12 2018, 10:05 am
Jewishfoodie wrote:
Math. And problem solving. One day she will be a math genius iyH!
Not necessarily. My ds who is a real math genius is distinctly not good with puzzles. My ds who is a puzzle expert is good with his hands, like building things, rubik's cube, etc. Hand-eye coordination and such skills.
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FranticFrummie









  


Post  Mon, Feb 12 2018, 11:59 am
DD is fabulous at puzzles, and masters them quickly before getting bored and wanting new ones.

She's terrible at math, a full 3 grades below average. On the other hand, she's a really good artist, with a great eye for balance and design.

3D puzzles and toys are a different story. That builds spacial perception, and a good builder could be come an architect or engineer. No guarantee, but you never know!

Personally, I find it best not to project the future on my child. I sit back and watch her become the person she is meant to be. Remember Polariod cameras? It's like being given a blank picture, and watching it develop slowly before your eyes. The discovery is the best part of the fun. Very Happy
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amother




Brown


Post  Mon, Feb 12 2018, 12:17 pm
freedomseek wrote:
Puzzles is many times an art. She might have a great eye for color
That’s how I do my puzzles real well


So that's what it is! I always wondered. My sister loves puzzles and I don't, but she's more artistic than me...

Thankfully, at least in my case, there doesn't seem to be a correlation. I did great in school, not so great with puzzles...
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amother




Seagreen


Post  Mon, Feb 12 2018, 1:23 pm
When my son was 18 months, he was doing puzzles designed for 4 years old and up. People watched him with mouths hanging open. he also knew all the alef beis and ABCs and numbers by name and sight and loads more. he could even tell you which color the alef bais and abcs appeared in on his puzzles when he wasn't looking at it.

He is now in kindergarten and doing very average.
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amother




Burlywood


Post  Mon, Feb 12 2018, 5:40 pm
The short is that it's not necessarily an indicator of intelligence.

My 4 year old can read and write in 2 languages and do math problems above age level, but can barely do a jigsaw puzzle meant for a 2 year old.

My cousin who had global developmental delays and learning disabilities - she didn't walk or talk until age 2 and still has significant learning disabilities and was in special ed all her life is AMAZING at puzzles from a young age.

Puzzles involve a very specific set of skills - mainly spatial relations. Additionally, at age 4, may children still can't distinguish between different orientations of 2D objects - for example a triangle with the point facing the top of the page and a triangle with the point facing the bottom of the page will be marked as identical by many 4 year olds, or that the lowercase b, p, and d will all be marked as identical. A 4 year old who is good at puzzles can already distinguish between these things (needed to know which way to put a puzzle piece in!), which is above average for this age group, though not necessarily exceptional. Also, other important skills for puzzles at this age are a sustained attention span (which sounds like it's at the higher range of normal 4 year olds), as well as high frustration tolerance and willingness to problem solve (also at the higher range for normal 4 year olds). Also requires good hand eye coordination, maybe higher end of average. So your 4 year old is very good at all these things, which can serve her well in general. So it doesn't mean she is (or isn't) bright because she can do advanced puzzles, but she sounds very strong in several areas which will help her out in school and in life.
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seeker









  


Post  Mon, Feb 12 2018, 5:58 pm
In theory, totally! Visual perception etc etc! In reality, I have not seen a correlation between puzzles and anything else. It is a form of intelligence, surely, but not the type that leads to drawing any other conclusions.

I also find that very often, isolated skills like these at young ages don't necessarily carry forth into the future. Other kids catch up. Sometimes kids do keep their same interests and skills, but not usually.

Which is not to say that OP doesn't have a genius on her hands. Just that I wouldn't go reading too deeply into the puzzle skill, impressive as it is.
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oliveoil









  


Post  Mon, Feb 12 2018, 11:24 pm
seeker wrote:


I also find that very often, isolated skills like these at young ages don't necessarily carry forth into the future. Other kids catch up. Sometimes kids do keep their same interests and skills, but not usually.



THIS.
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