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2 year old dd. where to start

 
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wazup




 
 
 


Post  Thu, May 04 2017, 1:18 pm
my dd is 2 and a few months. she is my first and has recently started telling me that she wants to "make in the toilet"
I bought an insert for the toilet and she loves to sit on it for hours but so far has not done a thing in the toilet.
so thats where she is up to.
anyway, I have no knowledge at all about toilet training so if anyone would be so kind as to give me the steps and/or tips on what to do I would greatly appreciate it! im in no rush I just figured that she seemed interested so I would try...
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Iymnok




 
 
 


Post  Thu, May 04 2017, 1:24 pm
My sister lent me a book that's really great, "Toilet Training in Less Than a Day"
It was written in like the 70's.
It has a checklist to see if your kid is ready and an exact method. It worked very well for my son and my niece.
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cm




 
 
 


Post  Thu, May 04 2017, 2:10 pm
Does she usually "go" at a certain time of day? For example, my dd at age 2 would routinely urinate (on the floor) while the tub was filling at bath time, so we would sit her on the potty then, so she could learn to understand what it was for. Even so, she was fairly late to train, so that may or may not help.

Don't expect too much at your daughter's age. She is still very young.
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Amarante




 
 
 


Post  Thu, May 04 2017, 3:05 pm
cm wrote:


Don't expect too much at your daughter's age. She is still very young.


Not necessarily.

While I am not going to offer opinions as to when toilet training should happen, children were routinely toilet trained in the US by 18 months before the era of disposable diapers because, even with diaper services, it was much more difficult to keep a child in diapers past that time.

Almost every baby boomer or child born a little later in the 1970's didn't experience undue long term psychic hardship from being out of diapers by 18 months. LOL

Toilet training prior to Baby Boomers (pre-Spock) was also early but parenting prior to WW II was pretty different than after WW II when Spock opened the way for a more relaxed style than had been the case. Interesting to talk to women who raised children in that era and had one before Spock and one (or more after Spock) and how radically child rearing especially for babies and toddlers changed in a very short period of time.
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lucky14




 
 
 


Post  Thu, May 04 2017, 3:31 pm
Amarante wrote:
Not necessarily.

While I am not going to offer opinions as to when toilet training should happen, children were routinely toilet trained in the US by 18 months before the era of disposable diapers because, even with diaper services, it was much more difficult to keep a child in diapers past that time.

Almost every baby boomer or child born a little later in the 1970's didn't experience undue long term psychic hardship from being out of diapers by 18 months. LOL

Toilet training prior to Baby Boomers (pre-Spock) was also early but parenting prior to WW II was pretty different than after WW II when Spock opened the way for a more relaxed style than had been the case. Interesting to talk to women who raised children in that era and had one before Spock and one (or more after Spock) and how radically child rearing especially for babies and toddlers changed in a very short period of time.


Do you know much about this? Mine is 16 months and I really want to get "started"- should I buy something to sit on the potty or a small potty on the floor? The small floor ones are easier for them I'm sure since they don't need to be lifted to sit on the regular toilet, but if you start with a little potty then how do you transition to a big one? and when?

(btw by getting started a don't mean full-blown potty trained but more like potty familiarized if that makes sense)
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Amarante




 
 
 


Post  Thu, May 04 2017, 3:58 pm
lucky14 wrote:
Do you know much about this? Mine is 16 months and I really want to get "started"- should I buy something to sit on the potty or a small potty on the floor? The small floor ones are easier for them I'm sure since they don't need to be lifted to sit on the regular toilet, but if you start with a little potty then how do you transition to a big one? and when?

(btw by getting started a don't mean full-blown potty trained but more like potty familiarized if that makes sense)


Get an older copy of Spock or any child book from the 1950's or 1960's - probably through the 1970's. Dr. Spock would be especially good on humane toilet training since he was viewed as the pediatrician/child expert who enabled parents to be softer and more progressive with their children and not think they were ruining them. Prior to him, mothers let their babies cry and didn't feed them except on a very rigid schedule.

I don't know the nuts and bolts. Kids did seem to have potties back then as I recall more so than the booster seats now but then people just made do with less for all kinds of things as merchandise was more expensive than it is now relative to income as there wasn't a lot of cheap imports. Not a judgment on import or trade policy Surprised but just as a student of cultural history, people owned less because everything was more expensive. Clothing and shoes were meant to last which is why closets in older homes are small - people just owned less stuff.

It's a mindset that my Bubbe had. I remember that she was super in to checking to see if hems or seams could be taken out. I mean in the age of Target and throwaway clothing, does anyone actually buy dresses with the expectation that their little girl is going to need to have the hem taken down as she grows :-)

But I digress. I only meant to point out that civilized well meaning parents from the end of WW II through the 1970's routinely expected their children to be fully toilet trained by 18 months and children were - with no horrendous impact on psychosexual development :-).

It's well documented that the age of toilet training coincided with the age of almost universal disposal diapers. And not to be cynical, but certainly diaper makers have a lot of income vested in having kids in their disposable diapers for as long as possible.
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Iymnok




 
 
 


Post  Thu, May 04 2017, 4:15 pm
I prefer a seat on the toilet with a step stool to a potty. That way they are used to a regular toilet from early on. Especially convenient when we are not at home. The stool is moved to the sink for washing, which is needed anyway.
In the beginning some of mine like the comfort of handles while sitting.
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cm




 
 
 


Post  Thu, May 04 2017, 5:30 pm
Amarante wrote:
But I digress. I only meant to point out that civilized well meaning parents from the end of WW II through the 1970's routinely expected their children to be fully toilet trained by 18 months and children were - with no horrendous impact on psychosexual development :-).

It's well documented that the age of toilet training coincided with the age of almost universal disposal diapers. And not to be cynical, but certainly diaper makers have a lot of income vested in having kids in their disposable diapers for as long as possible.


My mother, who had her children in the 1960's, says that in her circles toilet-training was expected, perhaps aspirationally, anytime after age 2, and usually accomplished by age three. This was a little earlier than today's standards, but not by much. Cloth diapers and very early not-so-absorbent disposables were in use at the time.

Some kids hate being wet and the use of old-fashioned diapers speeds up the training process, but others don't care. And according to our pediatrician, the late trainers may also be the kids with bed wetting issues through grade school, related to the size of the bladder - it's definitely multifactorial.

Caregivers who are very alert to their baby's signals (and who have a high tolerance for accidents) can put them on the potty whenever they need to go, reducing or eliminating the need for diapers. Nowadays this is called "elimination communication," but it is the adult who is trained more so than the baby.

So, I sort of agree with you: super-absorbent diapers may make a difference, and attitudes toward toilet-training vary across cultures and eras. But it is a stretch to say that everyone in America expected babies to be toilet trained as one-year-olds.
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