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How easy is it to learn programming in C#/ ASP.net ?

 
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amother




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Post  Tue, Feb 26 2019, 6:14 am
My DH is a programmer with many years experience in programming in Classic ASP.

His current employer has not given him any opportunity to develop more up to date skills, aside from the odd project in C# or JAVA where he has had to look everything up.

He understand that to progress, he is going to have to learn more modern programming languages but is wondering how big of an undertaking this is, considering it will all be in his spare time.

I am trying to support him but don't know much about the field so it's hard to give realistic advice.

Has anyone or their DH learnt C# at home? How long did it take before you were proficient enough to seek work? Can you recommend a good book or online course of study?
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amother




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Post  Sun, Mar 03 2019, 3:50 pm
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amother




Slategray


Post  Sun, Mar 03 2019, 5:34 pm
It is a bit of a learning curve and it will take time. There is a lot that changed with the transition from classic asp to .net and then .net core.

However there is so much online documentation now, and so many templates available that it really can be self taught.
Probably best way to learn is to actually undertake a project and see it to completion.

Is he part of the frum devs slack group? Lots of resources there.
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TriAspora




 
 
 


Post  Sun, Mar 03 2019, 5:50 pm
Since he already has experience in web programming, learning another technology is quite doable, especially with many available Microsoft and other tutorials. Amother Slategray is so right about doing a project as a way to learn.

I think that especially Core.Net has lots of potential for the future.

Best of luck!
https://docs.microsoft.com/en-.....ork-server
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amother




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Post  Tue, Mar 05 2019, 6:34 am
Thank you both so much! That's really helpful. Are you both programmers? How did you train?

So just to clarify, it should be able to be self taught from a book, or from an online course?

Amother, no he's not a member of the frum devs slack group. How would he join?

TriAspora, thanks for the link on .net framework and .net core.

Another question: Would Java be easier to learn than .net?

I should have mentioned before in case it wasn't obvious that DH also has a lot of experience with javascript and a few other Scripting languages, but no object oriented languages.
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sympa




 
 
 


Post  Tue, Mar 05 2019, 7:27 am
My programming experience is very limited but check out Codeacademy for online courses.
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TriAspora




 
 
 


Post  Tue, Mar 05 2019, 7:36 am
I am happy to help. I am a programmer. Trained in college, but re-trained multiple times since then, because technologies are evolving.

Your husband can learn from books, online tutorials, Youtube and Pluralsight videos - there is so much information and everyone has their own learning style. But doing a few projects of his own is the key.

I don't program in Java, but I think it would take him about the same time to learn any object oriented language. A very rough estimate is 6 months. It takes more than just reading a book.

The question is what to learn. Java? .NET? He needs to do some market analylis of jobs wanted in the area where he lives and read some lively Reddit discussions on the topic. I would think that .NET/C# is has more job opening than Java, but I can well be mistaken. Your husband needs to do his own research.

Great that he knows Javascript. It is still widely used. And he can then learn Angular some time later.

Best of luck to your husband! Besides the parnosa angle, learning your first object oriented language is incredible fun!
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amother




Lawngreen


Post  Tue, Mar 05 2019, 9:33 am
I have been programming in C#.Net with SQL Server for about 15 years. I got a BA in CompSci from University and then went to school evenings for my MA while working full time. I was single and living at home then so it was not as hard as it could have been if I were married with children.
The best way to learn is actually at work. You mentioned that he was given some odd projects in C#. If he can find a way to contribute on C#.net or Java projects - if there are - he can learn very quickly. The first few times he does a particular function or sets up a module he will look it up. Then he will have to look up less and less.
Actually, experienced programmers look things up all the time.
I always forget formatting and have to look it up.
He would do well to learn SQL Server as well for back end stored procedure programming.
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amother




Plum


Post  Wed, Mar 06 2019, 6:41 am
TriAspora wrote:

The question is what to learn. Java? .NET? He needs to do some market analylis of jobs wanted in the area where he lives and read some lively Reddit discussions on the topic. I would think that .NET/C# is has more job opening than Java, but I can well be mistaken. Your husband needs to do his own research.


He has done a fair bit or research but feels a bit lost which is why I'm trying to help him out by talking to others. There are plenty of opportunities in both C# and Java. Probably slightly more in C# which DH also said he finds easier to work with from the limited experience he has had in both, so it would seem that that would be the logical choice to learn. However, many of the jobs calling for C# are also asking for a list of other things too, like CSS3 and HTML5 which he has never used (he uses CSS and HTML) while the Java positions seem to call for fewer additional skills. It would probably be Worth his while to concentrate on Java it would be significantly easier to learn, which doesn't seem to be the case from what you've written and from he already thought.

TriAspora wrote:
Great that he knows Javascript. It is still widely used. And he can then learn Angular some time later.


Yes, he was actually hired to his current post as a Javascript developer. He has very limited experience in Angular and has noticed that many jobs are calling for it now. How complicated is that to learn? Additionally, he has noted that SASS, LESS, React and Redux are also common requirements which he has no experience in.

I think this is why he is feeling a bit overwhelmed. In his previous jobs he has been able to learn on the job and become skilled in whatever language he was using (He started with C years ago) but his current post hasn't given him much opportunity for development and now there are all these new technologies it feels a bit like starting from the beginning again.
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amother




Plum


Post  Wed, Mar 06 2019, 6:43 am
amother wrote:
He would do well to learn SQL Server as well for back end stored procedure programming.


He has been using SQL for over 10 years. Glad to read that's still a valid skill!
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TriAspora




 
 
 


Post  Wed, Mar 06 2019, 7:02 am
Job descriptions often include technologies that are not even used by the company yet, but are under consideration of being implemented. I think that if your husband is comfortable in .NET or Java, he can figure out other stuff step by step and won't need a "perfect" resume to get a job.

A web page is a web page - once you understand it, you can figure out how to make it run using whatever language you need. Hatzlocho!
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ggdm




 
 
 


Post  Wed, Mar 06 2019, 1:39 pm
If your husband knows how to program, he should be fine on his own figuring out a different language or framework. If he has never learned about object oriented programming, he should try to find an online course or book specifically for that. I'd look for the keyword "objects first" teaching. I personally like Greenfoot for Java (it is meant for children, so it is really easy and very detailed). I cannot recommend anything for C#, as I don't know it. Any beginner's class should be easy and quick for him and then it's a good idea to do some project. He will learn there.

I personally wouldn't think twice about applying for a job that requires HTML5 if I know HTML. It usually is possible to learn on the job if you have a basis. Plus he could spend some time looking into it after he applies before the interview. I do think Angular or React are more complicated. But as an experienced JS developer, it may actually be fun for your husband to look into them. And maybe easier for him than learning C#.

He will be fine. Let him take any online course, see if he likes it, otherwise try another. There are tons. And have confidence. Specific Technologies change, but the basics stay the same.
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