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If your child has Autism: do you remember...
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amother




OP


Post  Thu, Jun 06 2019, 9:57 am
Hi, my baby is considered high risk of Autism because DH and I each have a first degree relative with Autism.

He is now 7 weeks old and makes good eye contact with me while nursing. Certainly that is a good sign, right?

If your child had Autism, do you happen to remember if they made good eye contact at this age?
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yksraya




 
 
 


Post  Thu, Jun 06 2019, 10:00 am
It's a good sign. May you see only nachas and may he be healthy till 120.

I can't answer your question tho as my autistic brother is older then me.
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amother




Copper


Post  Thu, Jun 06 2019, 10:43 am
you cannot tell autism until 18 months earliest. thats when my child was diagnosed and he was completely normal, smiling and eye contact etc. until then. not to worry you, but its completely counterproductive to worry throughout your babys infancy. whatever happens will happen, no need to worry now. how do you know you are at a high risk?
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amother




Floralwhite


Post  Thu, Jun 06 2019, 10:50 am
amother [ Copper ] wrote:
you cannot tell autism until 18 months earliest. thats when my child was diagnosed and he was completely normal, smiling and eye contact etc. until then. not to worry you, but its completely counterproductive to worry throughout your babys infancy. whatever happens will happen, no need to worry now. how do you know you are at a high risk?

I dis agree. My baby made eye contact but didn't smile until about 4 months. Stopped with eye contact by 6 months. Was rocking in my arms when I held him and never responded to his name. He was diagnosed with autism before a year. I do agree though that there is no point examining your baby for signs and symptoms. It's easy to get caught up in the what ifs. IyH he will be fine, even high risk is not a huge risk- just a little higher than average population.
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flowerpower




 
 
 


Post  Thu, Jun 06 2019, 10:54 am
Early signs of autism are-
No eye contact
They don’t calm down when they hear a person entering the room and they are crying
They don’t sooth even when you hold them
Etc

But most kids regress between 12-18 months and that is when the signs start to show.
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amother




Papaya


Post  Thu, Jun 06 2019, 10:57 am
I know you didn't ask, but to be on the safe side, hold off on vaccines. Your child is one of those who should qualify for a medical exemption.
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amother




Burlywood


Post  Thu, Jun 06 2019, 11:16 am
amother [ Papaya ] wrote:
I know you didn't ask, but to be on the safe side, hold off on vaccines. Your child is one of those who should qualify for a medical exemption.


Why? There is NO connection! Twisted Evil
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amother




Indigo


Post  Thu, Jun 06 2019, 11:26 am
My DD wasn't diagnosed until later, but there were signs of it from birth.

1. She HATED water touching her (and still does now, as an adult!). She visibly flinched whenever we bathed her, even while still in the hospital!

2. She slept through the night from birth and never cried. Everyone said what an easy baby she was...

3. She was perfectly happy being left on her own and didn't seem interested in interacting with other people.

4. She was a very deep sleeper. She would not nap during the day, but at 3 months she was sleeping 15 hours a night and there was no way to wake her. We could lift her up and move her around and she would carry on sleeping. She is still a very deep sleeper even now and can fall asleep literally anywhere, when she's stressed and drained!

5. She had texture issues with clothes and food (and still does).

6. She never played with toys in the way they were designed to be used.

7. She had impressive muscle tone from birth. She lifted her head up and turned to look around within a few minutes of being born. She could sit up unaided at 5 months and was walking by 10 months.

But she never avoided eye contact. That is really not the only way to diagnose autism.
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amother




Coffee


Post  Thu, Jun 06 2019, 11:28 am
amother [ Papaya ] wrote:
I know you didn't ask, but to be on the safe side, hold off on vaccines. Your child is one of those who should qualify for a medical exemption.


You’re right she didn’t ask you


Last edited by amother on Thu, Jun 06 2019, 12:22 pm; edited 1 time in total
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amother




Goldenrod


Post  Thu, Jun 06 2019, 11:31 am
My child with autism made exceptionally strong eye contact as a young infant, like EXCEPTIONALLY strong. Over time his gaze became atypical, and eye contact was inconsistent. He doesn’t have terrible lack of eye contact even now. He was formally diagnosed at 17 months. We suspected it for many months before that. Every case is different.

Vaccines do NOT cause autism!!!! My child was “different” long before he ever got a vaccine.
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amother




Olive


Post  Thu, Jun 06 2019, 11:33 am
amother [ Copper ] wrote:
you cannot tell autism until 18 months earliest. thats when my child was diagnosed and he was completely normal, smiling and eye contact etc. until then. not to worry you, but its completely counterproductive to worry throughout your babys infancy. whatever happens will happen, no need to worry now. how do you know you are at a high risk?


Not true. My severely autistic daughter had problems beginning right away.
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amother




Papaya


Post  Thu, Jun 06 2019, 11:43 am
amother [ Goldenrod ] wrote:

Vaccines do NOT cause autism!!!! My child was “different” long before he ever got a vaccine.

This has never been proven or disproven regarding all vaccines, only the MMR (and then it wasn't compared with unvaccinated vs. vaccinated with MMR, but just to see if the MMR itself is the trigger).
For example, the DTap:https://www.nap.edu/read/13164/chapter/12#545
In general the Institue of Medicine's inconclusive conclusions about many issues regarding vaccines leaves us wondering why these things aren't being studied.
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amother




Copper


Post  Thu, Jun 06 2019, 11:50 am
maybe severe autism you can tell right away but PDD and mild autism does not present until closer to age 2
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seeker




 
 
 


Post  Thu, Jun 06 2019, 11:56 am
Let's not make this a vaccine debate, that wasn't the topic and we have a forum for that now.

OP you should definitely enjoy milestones like this, and worrying over each specific skill is going to be counterproductive. But you need to know that there are many different presentations of autism and there is no one marker that says whether a person has it. So it's good to celebrate skills that are reached, because if your baby DIDN'T make eye contact that would be noteworthy, but the fact that she did doesn't really mean anything.
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amother




Wheat


Post  Thu, Jun 06 2019, 12:01 pm
amother [ Indigo ] wrote:
My DD wasn't diagnosed until later, but there were signs of it from birth.

1. She HATED water touching her (and still does now, as an adult!). She visibly flinched whenever we bathed her, even while still in the hospital!

2. She slept through the night from birth and never cried. Everyone said what an easy baby she was...

3. She was perfectly happy being left on her own and didn't seem interested in interacting with other people.

4. She was a very deep sleeper. She would not nap during the day, but at 3 months she was sleeping 15 hours a night and there was no way to wake her. We could lift her up and move her around and she would carry on sleeping. She is still a very deep sleeper even now and can fall asleep literally anywhere, when she's stressed and drained!

5. She had texture issues with clothes and food (and still does).

6. She never played with toys in the way they were designed to be used.

7. She had impressive muscle tone from birth. She lifted her head up and turned to look around within a few minutes of being born. She could sit up unaided at 5 months and was walking by 10 months.

But she never avoided eye contact. That is really not the only way to diagnose autism.

And my DD was the opposite on almost all of these things and also has ASD.
Loves water
Never sleeps
Wanted to be held all the time
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momsrus




 
 
 


Post  Thu, Jun 06 2019, 12:03 pm
amother [ Papaya ] wrote:
This has never been proven or disproven regarding all vaccines, only the MMR (and then it wasn't compared with unvaccinated vs. vaccinated with MMR, but just to see if the MMR itself is the trigger).
For example, the DTap:https://www.nap.edu/read/13164/chapter/12#545
In general the Institue of Medicine's inconclusive conclusions about many issues regarding vaccines leaves us wondering why these things aren't being studied.


It never been proven or disproven that dogs can’t fly. Just because you never saw them fly doesn’t mean they can’t.
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Beingreal




 
 
 


Post  Thu, Jun 06 2019, 1:02 pm
[quote="amother [ Papaya ]"]I know you didn't ask, but to be on the safe side, hold off on vaccines. Your child is one of those who should qualify for a medical exemption.
[/quote

Really? Again? Who says?
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seeker




 
 
 


Post  Thu, Jun 06 2019, 1:06 pm
Please stop feeding the trolls
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amother




Floralwhite


Post  Thu, Jun 06 2019, 1:43 pm
amother [ Copper ] wrote:
maybe severe autism you can tell right away but PDD and mild autism does not present until closer to age 2

My child has pdd/autism and he was diagnosed before a year. My other child does not have either but she was diagnosed at 5 in order to get services. (After severe pressure from the school, I still feel sick about this)
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JoyInTheMorning




 
 
 


Post  Thu, Jun 06 2019, 2:22 pm
You can have a child with a lot of signs of being "different" in some way who still does not have autism, or anything like that. My first child screamed non stop (worse colic case recorded in history, I think), wouldn't be soothed by anything except for nursing, never slept except for catnaps in my arms, hated water or lotion or anything touching him, was bothered both by almost every texture of clothing, and by not wearing clothing. He made eye contact a lot, but he glared at me. There was only one good sign: he was extremely aware of other people, and in fact "behaved" for others even during early infancy. He didn't glare at them and toned down his screaming. (Me, I truly think I lost part of my hearing due to his screaming as an infant.)

I worried about autism. But I remember at one point taking him to a doctor when he was a few months old, and the elevator in the medical building had a ceiling with a beautiful night sky with twinkling stars painted on it. My son was fascinated with that ceiling, and temporarily stopped screaming. A doctor, not the one we had the appointment with, just some random doctor, came into the elevator and observed my son observing the ceiling. He started interacting with my son, and my son responded in his way. The doctor, who was some sort of pediatrician, looked at me and said, "Wow, look at how he interacts with me! That is one child who has been loved and cherished. I've been working with babies for 35 years and I can tell."

I still tear up when I think about it. I had spent three months thinking that my child would never interact normally with others and would spend his whole life screaming. But this doctor saw something positive in my child's interaction with others, and he attributed it at least partly to how he was cared for at home. It meant the world to me.

This child is now in high school and is an easy-going, delightful young man. He's an astute observer of human nature. Somehow that doctor saw that.

The point of my story is that all of the signs that we always read about don't mean much in themselves. They don't mean much even in combination. Just enjoy your baby.
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