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Steak on Friday night

 
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amother




OP


Post  Thu, Jul 18 2019, 12:16 am
I'd like to serve steak on Friday night. How can I keep it warm without overcooking or drying it out?
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amother




Slateblue


Post  Thu, Jul 18 2019, 12:20 am
If you marinate it first, make extra marinade, and pour that on top. Warm the steak in the liquid.
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sky




 
 
 


Post  Thu, Jul 18 2019, 12:53 am
Sprinkle with salt and pepper. Grill steak on both sides to grill the outside.
Stick in on oven a few minutes before Shabbos to finish cooking. The longer it’s in the on oven the more it’ll be done. For medium rare very short. I like it more well done so I leave it in longer. Turn off oven and don’t open door until serving to keep warm.
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thanks




 
 
 


Post  Thu, Jul 18 2019, 12:56 am
We've been making early shabbos. So I light candles about 20-30 minutes after my husband leaves. I put the meat or chicken cutlets in the oven right before I light so it's not that long and it won't dry out.

Alternatively, I put bbq'ed steak on top of the crock pot.
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andrea levy




 
 
 


Post  Thu, Jul 18 2019, 1:12 am
We cook it to between 125 and 130 in sous vide, quick grill it and eat it at room temp
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tichellady




 
 
 


Post  Thu, Jul 18 2019, 1:21 am
Make right before shabbos and just leave out and serve it warm - do not warm it
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FranticFrummie




 
 
 


Post  Thu, Jul 18 2019, 2:06 am
thanks wrote:
We've been making early shabbos. So I light candles about 20-30 minutes after my husband leaves. I put the meat or chicken cutlets in the oven right before I light so it's not that long and it won't dry out.

Alternatively, I put bbq'ed steak on top of the crock pot.


Check with your rabbi. I learned that you can't "cook" food on Shabbos, and that means you can't start raw food just before lighting candles. Food has to at least be at an edible state.

In the summer, I like to make a steak medium done, let it sit, and then slice it very thinly. I serve it on a bed of fresh spinach and sliced strawberries, with a balsamic vinegar glaze. At room temperature, it's absolutely perfect.
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thanks




 
 
 


Post  Thu, Jul 18 2019, 2:10 am
FranticFrummie wrote:
Check with your rabbi. I learned that you can't "cook" food on Shabbos, and that means you can't start raw food just before lighting candles. Food has to at least be at an edible state.

In the summer, I like to make a steak medium done, let it sit, and then slice it very thinly. I serve it on a bed of fresh spinach and sliced strawberries, with a balsamic vinegar glaze. At room temperature, it's absolutely perfect.

I guess I wasn't clear.
I cook it on the BBQ, then warm it in the oven. It hoes in the oven right before I light.
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FranticFrummie




 
 
 


Post  Thu, Jul 18 2019, 2:20 am
thanks wrote:
I guess I wasn't clear.
I cook it on the BBQ, then warm it in the oven. It hoes in the oven right before I light.


OK, that makes more sense. I've heard of people putting raw food in the oven and then setting the oven on a timer, lighting candles, and then serving the cooked meat when it's done.

A friend of mine went to someone's house where a new BT had cooked that way, and she couldn't eat the food that had been cooked during Shabbos. She stuck to things like salad and dips. It was tricky because she didn't want to embarrass her hostess.

The halachot of blechs are very complicated, too. Not everyone knows the restrictions. That's why I love my water blech. It's a kli sheini, so the halachot are much more lenient.
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thanks




 
 
 


Post  Thu, Jul 18 2019, 2:53 am
FranticFrummie wrote:
OK, that makes more sense. I've heard of people putting raw food in the oven and then setting the oven on a timer, lighting candles, and then serving the cooked meat when it's done.

A friend of mine went to someone's house where a new BT had cooked that way, and she couldn't eat the food that had been cooked during Shabbos. She stuck to things like salad and dips. It was tricky because she didn't want to embarrass her hostess.

The halachot of blechs are very complicated, too. Not everyone knows the restrictions. That's why I love my water blech. It's a kli sheini, so the halachot are much more lenient.

Your blech may be a kdeira al gabbei kdeira.
Klei sheini is something different.
Hot food in a Klei rishon thatgets transferred, and is now in a Klei sheini.
Cold food that has no sauces or wetness can be placed in a kdeira al gabei kdeira. (a pot on top of the pot that is on the fire.)
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amother




OP


Post  Thu, Jul 18 2019, 10:27 am
I made it once last summer . I cooked it before lichtbentchen and by the time I served it, it was dry and tough. Which is a shame bc steak is expensive and we rarely eat it.

It's about 2 hours from lichtbentchen till we eat it. For the one who suggested pouring liquid or marinade on it--what kind of liquid? Do you have a recipe?
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rakcna




 
 
 


Post  Thu, Jul 18 2019, 10:49 am
FranticFrummie wrote:
Check with your rabbi. I learned that you can't "cook" food on Shabbos, and that means you can't start raw food just before lighting candles. Food has to at least be at an edible state.

In the summer, I like to make a steak medium done, let it sit, and then slice it very thinly. I serve it on a bed of fresh spinach and sliced strawberries, with a balsamic vinegar glaze. At room temperature, it's absolutely perfect.


Just to clarify, this issue with food that is not yet cooked before Shabbat is only a concern Friday night. It needs be partially cooked prior to Shabbat in order to keep it on the fire and eat it Friday night.

However there is a leniency for food for Shabbat day. You can put raw meat in your cholent right before Shabbat and not have this issue as long as it isn’t for Friday night and you can’t stir it. Ask your LOR for particulars if this is something you would like to do.

(My husband is a Posek for a Sephardic community in America who answers questions about this on a daily basis)
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Raisin




 
 
 


Post  Thu, Jul 18 2019, 10:55 am
I had rib roast at a wedding recently. It was really good. It was cooked, sliced thin, but not kept on a hot plate.and served at the reception. That may work better then steak. (its the same cut of meat, just in a roast and not sliced) But I guess you need to be serving a few people for that to work.
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andrea levy




 
 
 


Post  Thu, Jul 18 2019, 11:01 am
FranticFrummie wrote:
Check with your rabbi. I learned that you can't "cook" food on Shabbos, and that means you can't start raw food just before lighting candles. Food has to at least be at an edible state.

In the summer, I like to make a steak medium done, let it sit, and then slice it very thinly. I serve it on a bed of fresh spinach and sliced strawberries, with a balsamic vinegar glaze. At room temperature, it's absolutely perfect.


Steak is edible raw. Many of us like steak tartare.
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andrea levy




 
 
 


Post  Thu, Jul 18 2019, 11:11 am
thanks wrote:
Your blech may be a kdeira al gabbei kdeira.
Klei sheini is something different.
Hot food in a Klei rishon thatgets transferred, and is now in a Klei sheini.
Cold food that has no sauces or wetness can be placed in a kdeira al gabei kdeira. (a pot on top of the pot that is on the fire.)


In my opinion she was not wrong in saying kli sheini in the context she did. The food is not going into a kli rishon in a kedeira. The food itself is in a kli sheini if it was moved to something else. Also I believe kli rishon loses its status as kli rishon after it cools below yad soledet bo.

The kedeira is the kli rishon. We are not putting things IN it, we are putting things on it ( on the lid). Which is the same concept of using the top of a crock pot, but ideally flatter with better surface area. If you put raw food directly on a kedeira top, I’m pretty sure it would actually be a kli sheini assuming the water wasn’t touching the lid on the inside. Even then, there might be a safek.

It is still possible to over heat even dry, medium rare meat on a water blech if it’s placed for a long time however in my opinion a good thick steak won’t be ruined Friday night on this, assuming you have the water set to not boil away thru Shabbat. I use a full sized hotel pan with a flat lid.
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