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simcha123456




 
 
 


Post  Tue, Aug 13 2019, 1:36 am


Last edited by simcha123456 on Tue, Aug 13 2019, 7:11 pm; edited 1 time in total
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baby12x




 
 
 


Post  Tue, Aug 13 2019, 2:14 am
Do you need the money?
If yes, don't quit the job.

WORK AT HOME JOBS ARE NOT INSTEAD OF CHILDCARE

This is a myth. It is impossible to work at home and take care of a child, especially when working for someone else.

You need to either change your hours to work at night when your husband is home or kid is sleeping or send your kid to a babysitter.
If not, you are heading to disaster
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amother




Ginger


Post  Tue, Aug 13 2019, 2:28 am
Welcome to Imamother.
I presume you need the money and you can't just be a SAHM, however you cannot work at home at the same time as look after a child. Any time I've worked from home means maybe 50% work and that's on a good day, when I'm looking after my kids.
I usually put in some work while my child slept and then worked again in the evening when they went to sleep for the night.
What is it that isn't working for you? Is it the work or the stress of managing a job at the same time as a child? Is there anything you can do to make that easier?
It can take time to get to grips with a new job-you worked in one place for 7 years, that's a long time, and you knew that place and how things worked inside out. Any new job takes time to settle in, what they want from you etc etc. When I switched jobs I would go to work each day with a little knot of anxiety for at least the first term, until I felt settled.

Do you have a contract with him? Everywhere I've worked has offered a trial period at the beginning that allows both you and the employer to politely say it's not working out. There's no reason an employer should be angry at you if it doesn't work out-it should make things easier if anything if he's frum, he might be more understanding of your difficulties.

If you've tried everything and can't see a way to make it work, then you have to find a way to say it's just not working for me. I appreciate the opportunity, but no. But, honestly, I would try and find a way to make it work for you if possible.

Hatzlacha Hug Hug
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FranticFrummie




 
 
 


Post  Tue, Aug 13 2019, 2:33 am
If you know you will do a terrible job, then you need to figure out how to make it work, or quit and find something easier. Believe me, your employer will be a lot more angry if you mess up something important.

Better to be honest and say "I really thought I could make this work, but with the new baby at home it's just too much for me. I'm really sorry, and I appreciate you giving me a chance."
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simcha123456




 
 
 


Post  Tue, Aug 13 2019, 2:59 am


Last edited by simcha123456 on Tue, Aug 13 2019, 7:12 pm; edited 1 time in total
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amother




Yellow


Post  Tue, Aug 13 2019, 4:08 am
I’m looking to work from home.
If your boss would be amenable to you splitting the workday with someone else I would be interested.

I can pm you if this is something you would consider.
Would also consider f/t if you decide to give it up.
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simcha123456




 
 
 


Post  Tue, Aug 13 2019, 4:22 am
amother [ Yellow ] wrote:
I’m looking to work from home.
If your boss would be amenable to you splitting the workday with someone else I would be interested.

I can pm you if this is something you would consider.
Would also consider f/t if you decide to give it up.

I’m still learning how this works lol. But yes, pm me! We can talk
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amother




Taupe


Post  Tue, Aug 13 2019, 7:17 am
My advice is to try and give it a little more time. This is a big adjustment for you in many ways, and it could be that after a week or so, you will feel more at ease with the situation. Maybe after a month, you will be happy with your job. Totally different situation, but when I started my job in a preschool last year, I was a wreck for the first week, and crying that I couldn't do it. It slowly got easier, and by three months in, it was the best job I've ever had.

Of course, you also have the complication of childcare. I don't have advice about that. It seems hard to do your job and care for your baby. Are you making enough to pay someone to watch her even part time?
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amother




Yellow


Post  Tue, Aug 13 2019, 7:19 am
simcha123456 wrote:
I’m still learning how this works lol. But yes, pm me! We can talk


I sent you a message.
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amother




Crimson


Post  Tue, Aug 13 2019, 7:29 am
I would say stick it out for a little bit.

1. You said you need the $ and can't go to regular job just yet.
2. You hate it because of the stress and it's not what you're used to, but you also only did one day. You will get used to the work and find it less stressful over time. I'm not saying you'll like it, but will find it less stressful as you adjust.

If in 2 months you're still drowning, you can honestly say you gave it a shot.
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simcha123456




 
 
 


Post  Tue, Aug 13 2019, 8:54 am
You’re right! Thanks. I guess it’s also a totally different type of job I am used to.

I’m sorry if I’m bothering people here or I sound ridiculous. I aguess I also feel this way bc I feel like my baby isn’t going to get the proper care he deserves

He’s my first baby too
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lcraighten




 
 
 


Post  Tue, Aug 13 2019, 9:02 am
Not to be repetitive, but I working from home does not mean that your child can be at home too. Are there any family members that can watch him for a little?

Give yourself some time to adjust to the new job! I think it will always be a bit of a tug-of-war between work and childcare, getting the balance just right is the key. In your situation I think you have to acknowledge that your priority here is a steady income and you will have to fit everything around that for the time being.

Good luck!!
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amother




Pewter


Post  Tue, Aug 13 2019, 9:40 am
A job that needs requires answering phones all day cannot be done caring for a child. It's not fair to the child or to the job.

Anyone who works at home - myself included - will tell you that it is not a replacement for childcare.
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marina




 
 
 


Post  Tue, Aug 13 2019, 9:48 am
try VIPKID if you were in education . https://t.vipkid.com.cn/

I do not work for them and will not get anything if you do or don't apply- just have some friends who found success with this
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sky




 
 
 


Post  Tue, Aug 13 2019, 9:53 am
It is possible to work from home with baby but takes time to get into the pattern of it. I’ve been doing it for years.

However if you have to be on the phone with clients and be professional that is near impossible. You cannot control the noises a baby makes.

Can you get someone in the house part of the time to help you with the baby.
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amother




Mistyrose


Post  Tue, Aug 13 2019, 10:11 am
Hi,

I've done both, working from home and out of an office. Let me tell you, once you'll get used to it, you'll love it! Working from home means you could put up supper, throw in a load of laundry, do minor housework, as opposed to when you go out to work you're on lock-down for 8 hours.

I'd tell you to give it a shot for a few weeks, and if you still don't like it, then consider your other options.
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