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Most absurd medical bill you have ever received?
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amother




Turquoise


Post  Sun, Sep 22 2019, 5:39 am
happyone wrote:
Delivery for a baby. denial read: "not medically necessary"
serious . I wanted to submit to every news station. this is before social media would have had a field day with Blue Cross Blue Shield .


Wow. They thought the baby should just chill for longer?

At one point the hospital goofed and admitted me when they shouldn't have (early labor), and the insurance denied it as not medically necessary. BH the hospital ate the cost of their mistake and didn't bill for it.
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sky




 
 
 


Post  Sun, Sep 22 2019, 5:46 am
amother [ Salmon ] wrote:
Most upsetting to me was a huge bill from the anesthesiologist after one of my births. Turns out he was out of network, so I had to pay my out of network deductible in addition to the in network deductible for my ob. And no one thought to tell me at the time that I was using an out of network doctor. Apparently they don't have to tell you, so never assume! My deductibles at the time were very high. Ugh.


I had this. The anastesialogist who showed up for my emergency c-section was out of network. I got a crazy bill. It only took 1 phone call though to get it fixed - everyone saw the issue with it.
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amother




Lime


Post  Sun, Sep 22 2019, 6:56 am
amother [ Chocolate ] wrote:
Umm, apparently many people in Canada, England, Isreal, etc.

Side point, if they studied in a "socialist" country, they don't have students debt!


Not nearly as many.

Again, why do people keep coming to the U.S. for medical care?

Whatever, I'm done with this argument. People believe what they want.
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yo'ma




 
 
 


Post  Sun, Sep 22 2019, 7:03 am
yo'ma wrote:
Absurd, but in a good way. About 20 years ago we came to visit my in laws here in Argentina. While we were here we were in a car accident on the highway. I got a cut on my forehead, so I was brought with my husband to the closest hospital. It was in a small town and of course a public hospital. The doctor came in to look at me and said I needed a tetanus shot and stitches. My husband had to go to the front desk and had to pay for each thing separately before they did anything. I think the total came out to less than $20. Now it would probably be a lot more. A few days later I went to a private hospital in the city for an ultrasound because I was 3 months pregnant and that was about $200. We would have done it at the public hospital at the time, but they said the wait was a few hours.

I wanted to point out that they wouldn't have treated me if I didn't pay in advance. Yes, they saw me, but that would have been it.
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amother




Chocolate


Post  Sun, Sep 22 2019, 8:54 am
dankbar wrote:
Yes many get into the field because they want to help people, but it's a job, they're in it for the money. If not for the big money, they wouldn't sustain & last at the job for years. Satisfaction, doesn't pay bills
Also, why would they invest time & effort to get better at what they are doing, if they won't have any gain from it & earn more?


Umm, because they care! It breaks my heart that you look at doctors that way...
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dankbar




 
 
 


Post  Sun, Sep 22 2019, 10:24 am
amother [ Chocolate ] wrote:
Umm, because they care! It breaks my heart that you look at doctors that way...


So you think that doctors only go into the field because they care, don't look at the money at all?

Why do people focus on long term ed, try to get into the best colleges/universities if not for getting a hi earning profession? Of course, they will major in a an area they have passion for, but doesn't mean they only go thru it, from the goodness of their heart!

Also if a dr would start out being a doctor, because it's a rewarding job & really have satisfaction from it, but after a couple of years, he would see, he can't pay his bills, would he stick around as a doctor, if there was no potential for growth for him there?
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amother




Navy


Post  Sun, Sep 22 2019, 12:20 pm
Being a British citizen I find it shocking to read this!
Yes we do have the NHS that is in a mess but we are so lucky, we can meet many wonderful doctors for FREE, we pay our taxes and that's it.
I have a child with a rare medical condition so we get to meet many doctors, some are fab and some are not, but you can always work to change consultants.
I think the medical care is not perfect anywhere but at least it's free by us.
Btw for the people saying that no where in the world would a foreigner get medical care, they are wrong, you can walk into any NHS and be charged, you also have an option of going to a privatefoctor or hospital.
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cbsp




 
 
 


Post  Sun, Sep 22 2019, 12:29 pm
amother [ Navy ] wrote:
Being a British citizen I find it shocking to read this!
Yes we do have the NHS that is in a mess but we are so lucky, we can meet many wonderful doctors for FREE, we pay our taxes and that's it.
I have a child with a rare medical condition so we get to meet many doctors, some are fab and some are not, but you can always work to change consultants.
I think the medical care is not perfect anywhere but at least it's free by us.
Btw for the people saying that no where in the world would a foreigner get medical care, they are wrong, you can walk into any NHS and be charged, you also have an option of going to a privatefoctor or hospital.


How much do you pay in taxes for your FREE healthcare?
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amother




Seafoam


Post  Sun, Sep 22 2019, 1:36 pm
cbsp wrote:
How much do you pay in taxes for your FREE healthcare?


Far far less than what she would be paying out of pocket to the specialists.
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Raisin




 
 
 


Post  Sun, Sep 22 2019, 1:50 pm
amother [ Lime ] wrote:
Not nearly as many.

Again, why do people keep coming to the U.S. for medical care?

Whatever, I'm done with this argument. People believe what they want.


Its a big country with a decent medical system. The more people you have, the more people with obscure complicated diseases there are. And the more drs to treat them. I live in a tiny European country. There are so few specialists in some areas the government pays for people to fly to other countries to get treated. Part of this is due to underinvestment in the health service (we do not have a very left leaning government at the moment) but otherwise it is simply due to low population numbers.

BTW the first IVF baby was not in the USA, it was in the UK. The first heart transplant was in South Africa. The UK, Germany, Israel, etc are places that people travel to for medical care as well from other countries. Many countries with nationalised medicine have private medical care available as well. I use a combination of private and national health services where I live. But I don't have to worry that I will drown in medical debt.
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amother




Seafoam


Post  Sun, Sep 22 2019, 2:32 pm
amother [ Lime ] wrote:
Not nearly as many.

Again, why do people keep coming to the U.S. for medical care?

Whatever, I'm done with this argument. People believe what they want.


as far as health care systems go - the U.S. system is not tops on anybody's list - with the exception of Americans.
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itsmeima




 
 
 


Post  Sun, Sep 22 2019, 2:33 pm
dankbar wrote:
So you think that doctors only go into the field because they care, don't look at the money at all?

Why do people focus on long term ed, try to get into the best colleges/universities if not for getting a hi earning profession? Of course, they will major in a an area they have passion for, but doesn't mean they only go thru it, from the goodness of their heart!

Also if a dr would start out being a doctor, because it's a rewarding job & really have satisfaction from it, but after a couple of years, he would see, he can't pay his bills, would he stick around as a doctor, if there was no potential for growth for him there?


I'm starting to wonder why nurses become nurses!
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amother




Green


Post  Sun, Sep 22 2019, 2:39 pm
amother [ Navy ] wrote:
Being a British citizen I find it shocking to read this!
Yes we do have the NHS that is in a mess but we are so lucky, we can meet many wonderful doctors for FREE, we pay our taxes and that's it.
I have a child with a rare medical condition so we get to meet many doctors, some are fab and some are not, but you can always work to change consultants.
I think the medical care is not perfect anywhere but at least it's free by us.
Btw for the people saying that no where in the world would a foreigner get medical care, they are wrong, you can walk into any NHS and be charged, you also have an option of going to a privatefoctor or hospital.


Just a small example. I recently saw a show where a baby born in the UK died after a few days because women there are not routinely checked if they are strep B positive in pregnancy, and the child died of sepsis (mother had strep B during delivery and passed it on to the child). They said that the NHS said there weren't enough cases of it to spend the money to make it part of routine care.

In the U.S. it's been part of the routine care for pregnant women for ages. I really could not believe what I was hearing, that in a first world country, they don't test for this. But I guess that's what nationalized healthcare will do for you.
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amother




Ginger


Post  Sun, Sep 22 2019, 2:54 pm
amother [ Green ] wrote:
Just a small example. I recently saw a show where a baby born in the UK died after a few days because women there are not routinely checked if they are strep B positive in pregnancy, and the child died of sepsis (mother had strep B during delivery and passed it on to the child). They said that the NHS said there weren't enough cases of it to spend the money to make it part of routine care.

In the U.S. it's been part of the routine care for pregnant women for ages. I really could not believe what I was hearing, that in a first world country, they don't test for this. But I guess that's what nationalized healthcare will do for you.

They're actually right. Many people end up strep B positive even after testing negative, and vice versa. Antibiotics are not without their own side effects. Studies proved that treating everyone who tested positive was not providing benefit, so they stopped testing.

The maternal and fetal death rate in the USA is very high, despite testing for strep B.
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amother




Seafoam


Post  Sun, Sep 22 2019, 3:24 pm
amother [ Green ] wrote:
Just a small example. I recently saw a show where a baby born in the UK died after a few days because women there are not routinely checked if they are strep B positive in pregnancy, and the child died of sepsis (mother had strep B during delivery and passed it on to the child). They said that the NHS said there weren't enough cases of it to spend the money to make it part of routine care.

In the U.S. it's been part of the routine care for pregnant women for ages. I really could not believe what I was hearing, that in a first world country, they don't test for this. But I guess that's what nationalized healthcare will do for you.


Infant mortality rate US 6.2 / 1000 live births. UK 4.8 / 1000
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amother




Lawngreen


Post  Sun, Sep 22 2019, 5:00 pm
United States - 5.8 per 1,000
The infant mortality rate in the US is 5.8 per 1,000. Though below the world average, this is above the country's neighbors like Cuba and Canada. The higher rate in the US has been blamed on a lack of accessible healthcare and the lack of a quality social safety net in general. Low-income families and children in the United States are especially vulnerable to infant mortality.

Our maternal mortality rate is 14 for every 1000 births. Also very poor in relation to Canada. When I was taught these statistics in college I was shocked.

In general the support the US government to childbearing women and infants is pathetic. But that's a whole other story.
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amother




Aubergine


Post  Sun, Sep 22 2019, 5:01 pm
The numbers don't lie. Americans currently pay way more for a much worse product. You are being ripped off.

https://www.americashealthrank.....rison
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ally




 
 
 


Post  Sun, Sep 22 2019, 5:04 pm
amother [ Seafoam ] wrote:
Infant mortality rate US 6.2 / 1000 live births. UK 4.8 / 1000


Not to mention the antibiotic resistant superbugs which are a result of overprescribing antibiotics
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