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Who won the Israeli election??
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Learning




 
 
 


Post  Thu, Sep 19 2019, 9:48 pm
I’m trying to figure it out but can’t see anything definite.
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Sebastian




 
 
 


Post  Thu, Sep 19 2019, 10:03 pm
no one. it was a stalemate
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grace413




 
 
 


Post  Fri, Sep 20 2019, 12:54 am
Everybody lost.
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ora_43




 
 
 


Post  Fri, Sep 20 2019, 1:37 am
Likud has 31 seats, Kachol v'Lavan (Blue and White) has 33.

We won't know who really "won" until we see which of them manages to create a coalition. Right now the heads of both parties (Bibi and Gantz) are trying to convince various smaller parties to recommend them as the next head of government.

The next step is that parties will make their recommendations to Rivlin (the president), who will then choose who gets the first stab at putting together a coalition.
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shabbatiscoming




 
 
 


Post  Fri, Sep 20 2019, 1:49 am
I say whichever party can assure us another vacation day in 6 months time would win my vote Wink
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SacN




 
 
 


Post  Fri, Sep 20 2019, 1:56 am
Quote:
I say whichever party can assure us another vacation day in 6 months time would win my vote Wink


I've been joking this for months. But then, you know, we will continue to just have no government. No budget. No major military decisions. No changes in funding for all the things that need money. I guess it's just not that funny.
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shabbatiscoming




 
 
 


Post  Fri, Sep 20 2019, 3:49 am
SacN wrote:
Quote:
I say whichever party can assure us another vacation day in 6 months time would win my vote Wink


I've been joking this for months. But then, you know, we will continue to just have no government. No budget. No major military decisions. No changes in funding for all the things that need money. I guess it's just not that funny.
Your right, its not funny. My "joke" was said sort of with sarcasm. Of course we need a government.
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SacN




 
 
 


Post  Fri, Sep 20 2019, 4:46 am
Sorry, I meant my comment on good nature towards you, less good naturedly towards our politicians.

This second election was because Bibi didn't want to give anyone else the chance to form a coalition, and now look. We've been 6 months with no government and the results are even more divided.

At least we got to barbeque again.
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shabbatiscoming




 
 
 


Post  Fri, Sep 20 2019, 4:50 am
SacN wrote:
Sorry, I meant my comment on good nature towards you, less good naturedly towards our politicians.

This second election was because Bibi didn't want to give anyone else the chance to form a coalition, and now look. We've been 6 months with no government and the results are even more divided.

At least we got to barbeque again.
I know. All good Smile
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etky




 
 
 


Post  Fri, Sep 20 2019, 6:04 am
SacN wrote:
Sorry, I meant my comment on good nature towards you, less good naturedly towards our politicians.

This second election was because Bibi didn't want to give anyone else the chance to form a coalition, and now look. We've been 6 months with no government and the results are even more divided.

At least we got to barbeque again.


Technically that's true, but essentially we had the second election because of Lieberman's personal vendetta against Bibi and, ostensibly (although personally I believe he was using this as a fig leaf) his anti-haredi bias. Nothing - no concession or incentive - could persuade him to join a coaltion. He was hell-bent on bringing Bibi down and that is why we had the second elections.
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etky




 
 
 


Post  Fri, Sep 20 2019, 6:14 am
ora_43 wrote:
Likud has 31 seats, Kachol v'Lavan (Blue and White) has 33.

We won't know who really "won" until we see which of them manages to create a coalition. Right now the heads of both parties (Bibi and Gantz) are trying to convince various smaller parties to recommend them as the next head of government.

The next step is that parties will make their recommendations to Rivlin (the president), who will then choose who gets the first stab at putting together a coalition.



I know this sounds pathetically optimistic, but theoretically it can still change a bit.
There are ballots from two towns that are being held up and investigated. These votes have not yet been counted and tallied.
One of the towns - Yarcha- is a Druse village in which a member of Likud resides. In previous elections the Likud has done very well there. All the Likud needs is about 1200 votes to take away a mandate from UTJ (Yehadut HaTorah) under the Bader-Ofer method of dividing 'leftover' seats.
By the same token, Lieberman also needs just a few thousand votes to take away a mandate from Kachol Lavan, although this is less likely.
While it's true that we're only talking about one seat, in this charged situation, every seat counts in potential coaltion negotiations and in the race for a majority.
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SacN




 
 
 


Post  Fri, Sep 20 2019, 8:35 am
Quote:


Technically that's true, but essentially we had the second election because of Lieberman's personal vendetta against Bibi and, ostensibly (although personally I believe he was using this as a fig leaf) his anti-haredi bias. Nothing - no concession or incentive - could persuade him to join a coaltion


Not just technically. After failing to form a coalition, it should have gone to kachol lavan. If they had formed a (charedi free) coalition with lieberman and the parties on the left, and maybe yemina, we could have had a coalition and a government. Lieberman would have gone for that, since it drastically weakens charedi government influence.

Instead, Bibi dissolved the government again, and called for elections again, in the hope that a second try would get his block more seats.
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LovesHashem




 
 
 


Post  Fri, Sep 20 2019, 8:51 am
I have no understanding at all in any of this.
Someone just update me when we have a new prime minister and who he is.
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etky




 
 
 


Post  Fri, Sep 20 2019, 9:01 am
SacN wrote:
Quote:


Technically that's true, but essentially we had the second election because of Lieberman's personal vendetta against Bibi and, ostensibly (although personally I believe he was using this as a fig leaf) his anti-haredi bias. Nothing - no concession or incentive - could persuade him to join a coaltion


Not just technically. After failing to form a coalition, it should have gone to kachol lavan. If they had formed a (charedi free) coalition with lieberman and the parties on the left, and maybe yemina, we could have had a coalition and a government. Lieberman would have gone for that, since it drastically weakens charedi government influence.

Instead, Bibi dissolved the government again, and called for elections again, in the hope that a second try would get his block more seats.


Kachol Lavan had about as much chance of putting together a coaltion after the April elections as an icecube in h-ll. It was a complete non-starter. At the most they could have put together 54 seats with Labor, Meretz, lieberman and Kulanu. THe DL partiy - Ichud MIflagot Hayamin - included far right Otzma which would never have joined such a coalition (or even been asked to join...). Had Yemin Hehadash and/or Zehut passed the threshold there might have been something to talk about.
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leah233




 
 
 


Post  Fri, Sep 20 2019, 9:07 am
I don't see how anyone can form a coalition now unless the party leaders get off their high horses.

I'd say that there is at least a 50% chance of a third election.
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iyar




 
 
 


Post  Fri, Sep 20 2019, 9:07 am
grace413 wrote:
Everybody lost.


Exactly.
This might be a good time for the chareidi population to do a little soul searching and figure out why a significant portion of the population voted with their top priority- keeping the frum out of power, out of influence and out of their lives.
We used to say, "deracheha darchei no'am".
If that was really the case, you wouldn't have politicians running on a platform of promising not to cooperate with frum citizens. And winning so many seats in the Knesset.
Deracheha - the ways of Torah, are no question absolutely darchei no'am.
What's being done that gives a different impression?
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SacN




 
 
 


Post  Fri, Sep 20 2019, 9:29 am
Quote:
This might be a good time for the chareidi population to do a little soul searching and figure out why a significant portion of the population voted with their top priority- keeping the frum out of power, out of influence and out of their lives.
We used to say, "deracheha darchei no'am".
If that was really the case, you wouldn't have politicians running on a platform of promising not to cooperate with frum citizens.


Too bad it's not so simple. The very real antangonim secular Jews feel towards people more religious than they are doesn't just disappear when we do our thing and they do theirs. Our very existence goads their yetzer hara to hatred.

My secular Israeli family in chul still hates religion. And they can take the bus wherever they want on Shabbat, marry whoever they want, open stores any day of the week.

It's very easy to hate/blame minority groups, especially when you find their very existence an affront to your way of life.

Edited to add: Remember who Lieberman used to blame for all of Israel's wrongs? It wasn't always the charedim. When public opinion was against the Arabs, he blamed them. He's an opportunist.
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leah233




 
 
 


Post  Fri, Sep 20 2019, 9:42 am
SacN wrote:
Quote:
This might be a good time for the chareidi population to do a little soul searching and figure out why a significant portion of the population voted with their top priority- keeping the frum out of power, out of influence and out of their lives.
We used to say, "deracheha darchei no'am".
If that was really the case, you wouldn't have politicians running on a platform of promising not to cooperate with frum citizens.


Too bad it's not so simple. The very real antangonim secular Jews feel towards people more religious than they are doesn't just disappear when we do our thing and they do theirs. Our very existence goads their yetzer hara to hatred.

My secular Israeli family in chul still hates religion. And they can take the bus wherever they want on Shabbat, marry whoever they want, open stores any day of the week.

It's very easy to hate/blame minority groups, especially when you find their very existence an affront to your way of life.

Edited to add: Remember who Lieberman used to blame for all of Israel's wrongs? It wasn't always the charedim. When public opinion was against the Arabs, he blamed them. He's an opportunist.


There is truth in what you are saying but still...

Thirty years ago secular Jewish Americans weren't nearly as hostile to frum people as secular Israeli's were. The reason IMHO was because secular Jewish Americans had no frum people on thier backs trying to dictate their lifestyles and screaming at them for driving on Shabbos etc.

Today secular Jewish Americans have indeed become way more hostile. But I think the reason for that is because liberals and leftists in general have become more hostile to religion over the past thirty years. Secular Jewish Americans are for the most part liberals and leftists. So they are just following the party line without any regard for the behavior of frum people per se.
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etky




 
 
 


Post  Fri, Sep 20 2019, 9:44 am
SacN wrote:
Quote:
This might be a good time for the chareidi population to do a little soul searching and figure out why a significant portion of the population voted with their top priority- keeping the frum out of power, out of influence and out of their lives.
We used to say, "deracheha darchei no'am".
If that was really the case, you wouldn't have politicians running on a platform of promising not to cooperate with frum citizens.


Too bad it's not so simple. The very real antangonim secular Jews feel towards people more religious than they are doesn't just disappear when we do our thing and they do theirs. Our very existence goads their yetzer hara to hatred.

My secular Israeli family in chul still hates religion. And they can take the bus wherever they want on Shabbat, marry whoever they want, open stores any day of the week.

It's very easy to hate/blame minority groups, especially when you find their very existence an affront to your way of life.

Edited to add: Remember who Lieberman used to blame for all of Israel's wrongs? It wasn't always the charedim. When public opinion was against the Arabs, he blamed them. He's an opportunist.


That he is. He himself lives in a mixed religious/secular community. His wife is traditional and he has a DL daughter. But he knows who his (secular, heavily Russian) electorate is and they are key to the fulfillment of his boundless personal ambitions.
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jerusalem90




 
 
 


Post  Fri, Sep 20 2019, 10:02 am
LovesHashem wrote:
I have no understanding at all in any of this.
Someone just update me when we have a new prime minister and who he is.


And whether or not he is good for the Jews.
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