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Is this appropriate?
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Amalia




 
 
 


Post  Sun, Sep 22 2019, 10:28 am
amother [ Lawngreen ] wrote:
How is it different from calling a Rabbi, Rabbi. I work in a dialysis clinic. One of my patients is a rabbi. I would never dream of calling him David, but rather I always address him as Rabbi Cohen. (Made up name. I did not to violate HIPPA). Rebbitzen Schwartz, is called Rebbitzen Schwartz or Rebbitzen, I would never call her Sarah. Even though neither of them is from my community, been my cholera teacher, or have I ever asked them for either etza or a shailah. They have earned a title of respect. The doctor, put in a tremendous amount of work,very much so has a lot to be proud of, and deserves that respect as well.


Cholera teacher? Surprised

Oy

I agree with your post. Smile
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amother




OP


Post  Sun, Sep 22 2019, 10:44 am
amother [ Ginger ] wrote:
Would you feel the same if it was a Rabbi?


Come to think of it, dh has a cousin who's a respected Rav and talmid chachom. If I call with a shaila, and the rebbetzin answers the phone, I'm not allowed to ask to speak with Rav Klein or even Rabbi Klein. She'll give me a 5 minute lecture that I must not consider them family if I insist on being so formal, I should of course ask for Shmuel! Confused

Of course I can't do that, so now, I don't ask for him. If she answers the phone I shmooze with her and wait for her to say, Oh, did you call for Shmuel?

This is the exact opposite situation, where I'm calling a rav in his capacity as rav and seeking his halachic guidance. And yet, they are turning down well deserved kavod. I think it speaks to the character of a person.
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amother




Brown


Post  Sun, Sep 22 2019, 6:56 pm
I'm a physician and I go by Dr., always.
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amother




Indigo


Post  Sun, Sep 22 2019, 7:18 pm
amother [ OP ] wrote:
Come to think of it, dh has a cousin who's a respected Rav and talmid chachom. If I call with a shaila, and the rebbetzin answers the phone, I'm not allowed to ask to speak with Rav Klein or even Rabbi Klein. She'll give me a 5 minute lecture that I must not consider them family if I insist on being so formal, I should of course ask for Shmuel! Confused

Of course I can't do that, so now, I don't ask for him. If she answers the phone I shmooze with her and wait for her to say, Oh, did you call for Shmuel?

This is the exact opposite situation, where I'm calling a rav in his capacity as rav and seeking his halachic guidance. And yet, they are turning down well deserved kavod. I think it speaks to the character of a person.


I don't think it speaks to character, its a combo of culture and preference.
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causemommysaid




 
 
 


Post  Sun, Sep 22 2019, 7:25 pm
amother [ Brown ] wrote:
I'm a physician and I go by Dr., always.


So if you meet a new neighbor or someone at a shul Kiddush you call yourself doctor?

Do your friends call you doctor?
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amother




Ivory


Post  Sun, Sep 22 2019, 7:33 pm
amother [ Brown ] wrote:
I'm a physician and I go by Dr., always.

Interesting
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amother




Brown


Post  Sun, Sep 22 2019, 8:49 pm
causemommysaid wrote:
So if you meet a new neighbor or someone at a shul Kiddush you call yourself doctor?

Do your friends call you doctor?


I say, "Hi, I'm Dr Rachel Goldstein." People don't call me doctor unless they were going to call someone Ma'am. Invitations should be addressed (according to me and Emily Post) to me as Dr Goldstein.
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amother




OP


Post  Sun, Sep 22 2019, 9:17 pm
amother [ Brown ] wrote:
I say, "Hi, I'm Dr Rachel Goldstein." People don't call me doctor unless they were going to call someone Ma'am. Invitations should be addressed (according to me and Emily Post) to me as Dr Goldstein.


May I ask why? If you're expecting the person, say a neighbor, to address you as Rachel anyway, why is it important to you that they know your profession up front, before even having a conversation?
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amother




Ivory


Post  Sun, Sep 22 2019, 10:34 pm
amother [ Indigo ] wrote:
I don't think it speaks to character, its a combo of culture and preference.

I disagree with you . It most definitely speaks to someones character. I cant imagine any humble rav introducing himself as rabbi so and so . I think it says a lot about a person when they introduce themselves by using their name only and not their job title or kavodik position .
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amother




Ivory


Post  Sun, Sep 22 2019, 10:35 pm
amother [ OP ] wrote:
May I ask why? If you're expecting the person, say a neighbor, to address you as Rachel anyway, why is it important to you that they know your profession up front, before even having a conversation?

Maybe she expects everyone to call her dr all the time .
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amother




OP


Post  Sun, Sep 22 2019, 11:26 pm
amother [ Ivory ] wrote:
Maybe she expects everyone to call her dr all the time .


She said they don't, though, unless they would otherwise call her ma'am. I'm assuming that new neighbors or friends of friends at a kiddush wouldn't otherwise be calling her ma'am.

I don't think there's any reason to do this other than looking to impress people. Which is anyone's right, they did work hard for their degree.
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