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amother




Crimson


Post  Wed, Sep 25 2019, 10:17 am
OP, some of the houses there look really beautiful on the inside. And they're really not small at all.

I vote you should paint, put new flooring, and freshen up in other ways. It's really going to make a difference, and the difference in your monthly payments would not be a lot.

Another thing - do you know anyone there? Because if you have friends where you live, that means the world. You can live in a stunning mansion but if you don't have nice neighbors it's all worth nothing.
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watergirl




 
 
 


Post  Wed, Sep 25 2019, 10:19 am
amother [ OP ] wrote:
yes, we had an inspector go thru every detail of the house but am concerned other items will start breaking later on.

Everyone has things breaking. The inspector who did my house told me the new construction houses in my area are falling apart quicker then the older homes. I remember being shocked that the walls in my house were not perfectly straight and he told me this is the least of the issues he sees. We are currently dealing with a broken a/c that IYH will be under $200 to fix but still, right before YT is upsetting.

I know its scary to look at this whole picture. Its a massive purchase and so long term! Maybe start another thread for perspective and take a poll, how old is your house and how frequently do you have to do repairs. And of the repairs, which are major and which are not? I'm sure it would be eye opening for you.
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amother




Cobalt


Post  Wed, Sep 25 2019, 10:22 am
amother [ OP ] wrote:
Yes, now is definitely the time to buy, that's what everyone tells us and know logically everything that everyone is saying is true. I guess I'm just scared and also not so tempted by this house. I keep thinking, what's so good about it? It's a regular small old townhouse with no property for a hefty fee.


you are paying for location. That is why there is a 'hefty fee'.
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amother




Oak


Post  Wed, Sep 25 2019, 10:34 am
rikki 1 wrote:
OP, I was looking to rent in WP and the roofs were going. A few of them were in middle of needing big repairs. Look into quality of roofs.


The homes are apparently about 20 years old. Most roofs are good for 20 to 30 years. That has nothing to do with the quality of the construction.

When you buy a home, you have to be ready for things to break, and to make substantial repairs. A few months after my friend Sharon bought her house, the sewer line went. My brother bought a 2 year-old, million dollar house -- 20 years ago, OOT, no less -- and had water infiltration issues that necessitated changing the front windows. If you can't deal with maintenance issues, don't buy a house.
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amother




Crimson


Post  Wed, Sep 25 2019, 10:42 am
rikki 1 wrote:
OP, I was looking to rent in WP and the roofs were going. A few of them were in middle of needing big repairs. Look into quality of roofs.


I bought a house from supposedly a quality builder (not in WP). I recently had to spend thousands of dollars on fixing my roof and my house is barely five years old. I don't believe the houses there are worse than anywhere else.
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BetsyTacy




 
 
 


Post  Wed, Sep 25 2019, 10:44 am
I agree with oak amother.
I have no idea if the houses in that section of Lakewood are "junky construction" because I dont know anything about Lakewood.
But, if you have an asphalt pitched roof it should last 20-30 years.
Unless you are talking about a mansion, or a really complicated roof, a roof should be in the $10K range. That is not the deal breaker for a house in your price range. It can also be fully done in a few days while you live in the house, as opposed to a drawn out kitchen renovation, or having new floors put in, which is a pain to live through.

FWIW, I live in a much older house where some parts are original, and some things need replacing every 20 years or so.
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amother




Mint


Post  Wed, Sep 25 2019, 10:56 am
Just read through this thread, I feel your pain, but you are very limited with location. I think your only other option with regard to driving, Shul, chassidish, simple type is sterling/ chateau. But I definitely think they’re a bit cheaper than wp location, and many homes are nicer inside than others. If you know ppl in the area, why not go for a shabbos and let your husband try out the Shuls in the area and see how he likes them? Sounds up your alley. I would not go into it with such bad feelings. Look into more options in sterling/ chateau. And also , please trust me, there are so many ppl building homes they absolutely cannot afford and are in way over their heads. Don’t look at others. As others have said, if you come in a little under budget, you can fix it up minimally. Scrape, paint alone make a huge difference. And you don’t have the pressure of making selections like you do with a new home. You can hopefully upgrade slowly as you are able to. Hatzlacha!
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amother




Copper


Post  Wed, Sep 25 2019, 11:18 am
Op, is your dh from Lakewood? Here is why I'm asking. I'm in a very similar situation as yours. I grew up in Lakewood. I'm chasdidish, but not as much as you. I went to Lakewood's less yeshivish schools and I drive, and wear longer sheitels than the average chasdidish woman. My children go to chasdidish/heimish mosdos. One difference I have is that I will not be getting any help from any parents, but I always knew that. Personally, I'd be fine with moving to Jackson of Raintree. Having a private home and yard, even if small is important to me. However, my dh, find his place in the shuls around the park/ridge area and one specific shul on particular. It's important to him that he can daven in his shul every Shabbos and our sons grow up around the shul. So now we are stuck in a basement for the near foreseeable future. I mentioned your dilemma about whispering pines and my husband didn't have an issue with buying there. But I, growing up in Lakewood, understand your father. People who haven't lived in Lakewood 20 years ago and are not familiar with the neighborhood do not understand what poor quality means. These are small, ugly, poorly constructed townhomes work no backyards. Very little parking, and narrow streets. If I was your father, I would also feel like it was a poor investment as I don't see the property value going up much, if at all. If your dh grew up in boro park, he's used to steel and concrete construction and condos with no property that go up in value. Truthfully though, I don't have any other ideas for you and I am just as stuck. I'm hoping I can stay in basement apartment for a few more years and hopefully afford something better. If you do end up buying, there is so much you can do inside to make it look nicer. One idea is to open up the floor plan on the main floor. It's not as traditional, but can be very cool and make everything seem larger.
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amother




OP


Post  Wed, Sep 25 2019, 12:00 pm
amother [ Copper ] wrote:
Op, is your dh from Lakewood? Here is why I'm asking. I'm in a very similar situation as yours. I grew up in Lakewood. I'm chasdidish, but not as much as you. I went to Lakewood's less yeshivish schools and I drive, and wear longer sheitels than the average chasdidish woman. My children go to chasdidish/heimish mosdos. One difference I have is that I will not be getting any help from any parents, but I always knew that. Personally, I'd be fine with moving to Jackson of Raintree. Having a private home and yard, even if small is important to me. However, my dh, find his place in the shuls around the park/ridge area and one specific shul on particular. It's important to him that he can daven in his shul every Shabbos and our sons grow up around the shul. So now we are stuck in a basement for the near foreseeable future. I mentioned your dilemma about whispering pines and my husband didn't have an issue with buying there. But I, growing up in Lakewood, understand your father. People who haven't lived in Lakewood 20 years ago and are not familiar with the neighborhood do not understand what poor quality means. These are small, ugly, poorly constructed townhomes work no backyards. Very little parking, and narrow streets. If I was your father, I would also feel like it was a poor investment as I don't see the property value going up much, if at all. If your dh grew up in boro park, he's used to steel and concrete construction and condos with no property that go up in value. Truthfully though, I don't have any other ideas for you and I am just as stuck. I'm hoping I can stay in basement apartment for a few more years and hopefully afford something better. If you do end up buying, there is so much you can do inside to make it look nicer. One idea is to open up the floor plan on the main floor. It's not as traditional, but can be very cool and make everything seem larger.


Thanks for understanding me so well! Actually, my dh is not from Lakewood, and not only that, but he grew up in small city apt and his parents never owned a home and still don't. So he's not that expert in home ownership. Whereas I grew up in typical older Lakewood home, much more strongly built and with a huge property in front and back, and my father has been home owner for 30 years so has way more experience, plus he's an accountant and a smart person. However, I always go by my husband's judgment and embrace everything with an open mind. I don't have boys but my husband very much enjoys a certain shul in the Park area, I wonder if they daven at the same one!
I went to yeshivish schools and wear short sheitel, very conservative clothing, feel comf with everyone but for my family's sake, wouldn't make sense Jackson or Raintree.
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amother




Cobalt


Post  Wed, Sep 25 2019, 12:12 pm
amother [ OP ] wrote:
Thanks for understanding me so well! Actually, my dh is not from Lakewood, and not only that, but he grew up in small city apt and his parents never owned a home and still don't. So he's not that expert in home ownership. Whereas I grew up in typical older Lakewood home, much more strongly built and with a huge property in front and back, and my father has been home owner for 30 years so has way more experience, plus he's an accountant and a smart person. However, I always go by my husband's judgment and embrace everything with an open mind. I don't have boys but my husband very much enjoys a certain shul in the Park area, I wonder if they daven at the same one!
I went to yeshivish schools and wear short sheitel, very conservative clothing, feel comf with everyone but for my family's sake, wouldn't make sense Jackson or Raintree.


Does your husband have a good understanding of how much money it will take to maintain the house? Can your family afford this?

Forget resale value - will you be able to keep up with the monetary demands of this home?
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amother




OP


Post  Wed, Sep 25 2019, 12:15 pm
amother [ Cobalt ] wrote:
Does your husband have a good understanding of how much money it will take to maintain the house? Can your family afford this?

Forget resale value - will you be able to keep up with the monetary demands of this home?


yes he does and I explained to him. He's extremely positive and also has some men's denial Smile so looking at it in diff way. He says well we sent in inspector and will fix whatever is needed and then we'll be all good.
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amother




Oak


Post  Wed, Sep 25 2019, 12:39 pm
amother [ OP ] wrote:
yes he does and I explained to him. He's extremely positive and also has some men's denial Smile so looking at it in diff way. He says well we sent in inspector and will fix whatever is needed and then we'll be all good.


A rule of thumb is saving 10 percent of the total cost of your property taxes, mortgage and insurance payments for repairs. So if you make a combined tax, mortgage and insurance payment of $2,000 per month, you should set aside another $200 for home repairs and maintenance.
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amother




Cobalt


Post  Wed, Sep 25 2019, 12:43 pm
amother [ OP ] wrote:
yes he does and I explained to him. He's extremely positive and also has some men's denial Smile so looking at it in diff way. He says well we sent in inspector and will fix whatever is needed and then we'll be all good.


This is not how home ownership works. A pipe that looks great today - can leak next week.

you basically implied you are living paycheck to paycheck as is - will you be paying less in mortgage+property taxes than you were in rent?
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amother




OP


Post  Wed, Sep 25 2019, 12:44 pm
amother [ Cobalt ] wrote:
This is not how home ownership works. A pipe that looks great today - can leak next week.

you basically implied you are living paycheck to paycheck as is - will you be paying less in mortgage+property taxes than you were in rent?


Yes, contingent on the basement rental. Otherwise we're in trouble. Sad
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suzyq




 
 
 


Post  Wed, Sep 25 2019, 1:13 pm
amother [ Oak ] wrote:
The homes are apparently about 20 years old. Most roofs are good for 20 to 30 years. That has nothing to do with the quality of the construction.

When you buy a home, you have to be ready for things to break, and to make substantial repairs. A few months after my friend Sharon bought her house, the sewer line went. My brother bought a 2 year-old, million dollar house -- 20 years ago, OOT, no less -- and had water infiltration issues that necessitated changing the front windows. If you can't deal with maintenance issues, don't buy a house.


The bolded above kind of says it all. I tell people all the time that owning a house is the worst - because you never know when you are going to be in for this or that repair, and some of them cost a LOT of money. Be prepared.
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GreenEyes26




 
 
 


Post  Wed, Sep 25 2019, 1:20 pm
amother [ OP ] wrote:
Yes, contingent on the basement rental. Otherwise we're in trouble. Sad


Of all the things you described, OP, this is what worries me the most. I hear that Lakewood has an over abundance of available basements. What if you don’t have renters for awhile? Then youre stuck in a house you hate AND can’t afford.

It seems to me the simplest solution is for your husband to find a new shul. You shouldn’t have to feel stuck in one place just because he likes davening somewhere. A shul is a shul.
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amother




OP


Post  Wed, Sep 25 2019, 1:22 pm
GreenEyes26 wrote:
Of all the things you described, OP, this is what worries me the most. I hear that Lakewood has an over abundance of available basements. What if you don’t have renters for awhile? Then youre stuck in a house you hate AND can’t afford.

It seems to me the simplest solution is for your husband to find a new shul. You shouldn’t have to feel stuck in one place just because he likes davening somewhere. A shul is a shul.


So we were told that basements in Whispering Pines are always in demand and we shouldn't have problem renting.
For my husband, it's not just a Shul, it's much more than that.
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amother




OP


Post  Wed, Sep 25 2019, 1:22 pm
suzyq wrote:
The bolded above kind of says it all. I tell people all the time that owning a house is the worst - because you never know when you are going to be in for this or that repair, and some of them cost a LOT of money. Be prepared.


I know and I have nowhere to take it from... Confused
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amother




Oak


Post  Wed, Sep 25 2019, 1:48 pm
amother [ OP ] wrote:
So we were told that basements in Whispering Pines are always in demand and we shouldn't have problem renting.
For my husband, it's not just a Shul, it's much more than that.


I get that. After leg surgery, my DH has trouble walking to "his" shul. I suggested that we spend the chagim at a shul that is literally down the street from us (with apologies to the person whose pet peeve is use of "literally"). He refuses. It's not "his" shul.

But you need to run the numbers. If the basement were empty for 60 days after a tenant left, or if your tenant failed to pay rent for a couple of months, and you had to evict (I'm assuming a legal tenancy, otherwise, good luck with that), could you pay your mortgage?

If there was a common type of repair needed in the house or basement apartment -- a leaky tub, or a water heater that needs replacement (average life, 8 to 12 years), do you have the funds to do it?

These are all things to consider before buying a house.
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amother




OP


Post  Wed, Sep 25 2019, 2:04 pm
amother [ Oak ] wrote:
I get that. After leg surgery, my DH has trouble walking to "his" shul. I suggested that we spend the chagim at a shul that is literally down the street from us (with apologies to the person whose pet peeve is use of "literally"). He refuses. It's not "his" shul.

But you need to run the numbers. If the basement were empty for 60 days after a tenant left, or if your tenant failed to pay rent for a couple of months, and you had to evict (I'm assuming a legal tenancy, otherwise, good luck with that), could you pay your mortgage?

If there was a common type of repair needed in the house or basement apartment -- a leaky tub, or a water heater that needs replacement (average life, 8 to 12 years), do you have the funds to do it?

These are all things to consider before buying a house.


I wouldn't manage without basement rental and wouldn't have where to take any funds for repairs, which is part of the reason I'm so hesitant.
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