Home

Chareidi schools and careers?
1, 2, 3, 4  Next  Last >>
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Forum -> Inquiries & Offers -> Israel related Inquiries and Aliyah Questions

View latest: 24h 48h 72h


amother




OP


Post  Mon, Oct 07 2019, 9:21 am
Hi, NOT trying to start any controversy of any kind. I just want to know facts, please, no bashing of any school system.

Are there chareidi schools in Israel where after high school some of the kids go on to become professionals (doctors, nurses, lawyers, businesspeople, engineers or architects, whatever)? And I know chareidi in Israel is not the same thing as in the U.S., so what I mean by that is something similar to yeshivish and the kids don't join the army. Thank you!
Back to top

Elfrida




 
 
 


Post  Mon, Oct 07 2019, 10:24 am
With boys it tends to be limited. They have limited secular education, and to go on to academic qualifications they normally have to so some kind of mechina (preparatory) course before they can enter any academic institution. This normally takes a year to eighteen months. I don't know about specific schools - it often depends in the individual boy. Age, and obligations in terms of the army are often a consideration. Courses are often more focused on being able to earn a living in a relatively short period rather than extended a academic qualifications, but I know there is is a Male nursing course at machon lev, and there are probably other courses that I don't know about.

Girls tend to get a fuller secular education, and over the past few years a number of chareidi colleges have been set up, giving academic qualifications, normally career focused. Entrance requirements vary, and girls will often need to make up bagruyiot and may also need to do a mechina before starting. There is a fairly wide range of courses, and most girls can find something to suit them. Again, if often depends on the girl rather than then school. A lit of Beis Yaakovs tend to tolerate rather than encouraging these courses.
Back to top

LovesHashem




 
 
 


Post  Mon, Oct 07 2019, 10:33 am
Businessman, computers, engineers, architecture, nursing, YES.
To become a doctor...no.
Back to top

Iymnok




 
 
 


Post  Mon, Oct 07 2019, 11:10 am
There is a mechina program for boys who want to go to college. It catches them up on the highschool subjects needed to do well. It’s short and intense, not all could handle it.
Back to top

amother




OP


Post  Mon, Oct 07 2019, 12:46 pm
Thanks for your responses! Just to be clear, does this in any way affect whether they have to go to the army or not? From what I understand it depends just on where they went to high school but we want to know what we're getting ourselves (including our kids) into before we make a decision about moving.
Back to top

Elfrida




 
 
 


Post  Mon, Oct 07 2019, 2:00 pm
Girls can get a religious exemption from the army, and then go on to study or work or do whatever they like.

Boys are required to do army service, and can get an exemption if they are involved in full time Torah study. After a certain age the army isn't interested any more, and they can do what they like. But there are a few years when leaving yeshivah and starting academic study or working is difficult. There are ways to get excused from army service. Someone with children that age will probably come on line soon and be able to give you more details.
Back to top

camp123




 
 
 


Post  Mon, Oct 07 2019, 2:46 pm
What justification is there not to go to the army if you are not learning?
I can hear that learning exempts you because imo you are doing your bit to protect eretz yisrael but if you're not learning then you need to go to the army and there are now frum ways to do it.
Once you are married with kids the army won't want you at that point there are different options for careers in charadi campus's.
Kiriyat ono offers a law degree, there's Machon lev... And others.
If you go to chader and then yeshiva katana you would have to do a mechina program. But yeshiva high schools like maarava or yishuv do bagrut.
Back to top

samantha87




 
 
 


Post  Mon, Oct 07 2019, 2:48 pm
First: Look into Yishuv Hachadash in Tel Aviv and of course Ma'arava. Both draw boys from chareidi and especially American families, and both teach secular subjects. Some graduates end up in kollel, and some pursue careers.

Obligations to the army may change depending on what government (if any Smile) is formed. They are always proposing new legislation, and for a few years all chareidi boys were fully exempt as part of a "make chareidim go to the army" bill. If your sons don't take Israeli citizenship they can sidestep the issue.
Back to top

LovesHashem




 
 
 


Post  Mon, Oct 07 2019, 4:06 pm
Also you can move here on an american visa and NOT become citizens if you want.
Many many people do that, you get the israeli healthcare and get to do everything else although you won't receive aliyah benefits. But the plus side is that your kids won't have to deal with the army.
Back to top

amother




OP


Post  Mon, Oct 07 2019, 5:22 pm
[quote="camp123"]What justification is there not to go to the army if you are not learning?
I can hear that learning exempts you because imo you are doing your bit to protect eretz yisrael but if you're not learning then you need to go to the army and there are now frum ways to do it.
Once you are married with kids the army won't want you at that point there are different options for careers in charadi campus's.


We want them to learn and also have a job, which is completely normal and expected in the general background I'm coming from. DH was raised in a culture where it was more one or the other and we find that it causes much more financial and emotional stress for him to not have a degree even though BH he's very smart and talented. It limits options. Waiting until you have a growing family complicates things.

We want them to have a solid yeshiva education so they can learn at a high level as much as their personalities and circumstances allow but want to make sure that doesn't mean that down the road they can't choose a job that suits them, and we've taught them from early on that yes, Torah comes first but the Chofetz Chaim owned a bookstore and the Rambam was a doctor.
Back to top

Rappel




 
 
 


Post  Mon, Oct 07 2019, 5:36 pm
For guys - Machon Lev is a very popular tech college. There are others, but that's the one that everyone knows about.

There are so many colleges (michlalot) for women that I can't name them. Many of the degrees will be specifically education based - e.g. "art and education," "drama and education," "early education" etc. Ml

May you have a successful and joyful Aliyah!!! If you have any questions, feel free to pm me - I'll be happy to help if I can.
Back to top

Rappel




 
 
 


Post  Mon, Oct 07 2019, 5:38 pm
LovesHashem wrote:
Also you can move here on an american visa and NOT become citizens if you want.
Many many people do that, you get the israeli healthcare and get to do everything else although you won't receive aliyah benefits. But the plus side is that your kids won't have to deal with the army.


That sounds unnecessarily complicated. It's so easy to not draft, and there are so many benefits to being a full citizen, that I can't see why you would go that route.
Back to top

imasoftov




 
 
 


Post  Tue, Oct 08 2019, 4:44 am
LovesHashem wrote:
Also you can move here on an american visa and NOT become citizens if you want.
Many many people do that, you get the israeli healthcare and get to do everything else although you won't receive aliyah benefits. But the plus side is that your kids won't have to deal with the army.

I'm not sure which of these visas you mean but most of them don't allow the person to work in Israel. There is a work visa listed there but I don't know if one would be granted permanently.
Back to top

amother




Ginger


Post  Tue, Oct 08 2019, 7:27 am
You could move on the A1 visa.We almost did, but then decided it would be nice to have another passport, which is why we decided on aliyah. We've been in EY several years, but don't know if we will stay permanently. Despite liking our childrens schools very much (Haredi, include some secular education), still there are issues with the chinuch here.

Even if your child receives a top-notch education, the job opportunities in EY are very poor compared to some other Western countries. If you work for an Israeli company, you are almost guaranteed to work longer hours, for less pay, with a relatively high cost of living. Yes it's cheaper on a yishuv or in the North... but then good luck with the commute and car/gas prices are high. The cost of owning a car here is 2-3X as much as in the States. We find food more expensive too (yes we shop on a budget, but the selection is rather limited compared to what we're used to) and apartment prices in Jerusalem are outrageous. You could move to a Haredi area outside of Jerusalem or Beni Brak, but then the community won't be so friendly towards the idea of working while learning, and you'll need to fit into a much smaller 'box.'

There are a lot of great things about EY, but Moschiach still isn't here, and so it's definitely not for everyone.
Back to top

Rappel




 
 
 


Post  Tue, Oct 08 2019, 7:33 am
amother [ Ginger ] wrote:
but then the community won't be so friendly towards the idea of working while learning, and you'll need to fit into a much smaller 'box.'
.



I've never tried to raise a haredi family in the city, so I was interested to read the whole of your response, but this line made me pause.

Many kollelniks whom we know have a side job while learning. I think the phenomenon is much more wide spread than is spoken about. It's certainly nothing to bat an eyelash about around here.
Back to top

amother




Ginger


Post  Tue, Oct 08 2019, 7:57 am
Rappel wrote:
I've never tried to raise a haredi family in the city, so I was interested to read the whole of your response, but this line made me pause.

Many kollelniks whom we know have a side job while learning. I think the phenomenon is much more wide spread than is spoken about. It's certainly nothing to bat an eyelash about around here.


I'm very happy to hear that where you live, working and learning together is both acceptable and common! Will it become the norm? I hope so.

Earning a sufficient parnossah in EY can be difficult, and OP's familiy should be prepared. What's considered a normal lifestyle here might be a shock for her kids if they're over 6/7 and used to an American lifestyle.
Back to top

amother




OP


Post  Tue, Oct 08 2019, 10:09 am
Thanks everyone for your replies, it's been really helpful! It's early days, but Rappel I appreciate the offer and will keep it in mind. Gmar chatima tova everyone!
Back to top

Ruchel




 
 
 


Post  Tue, Oct 08 2019, 10:46 am
Be careful with the citizenship, I know people who had problems and had to send their sons abroad
Back to top

LovesHashem




 
 
 


Post  Tue, Oct 08 2019, 11:03 am
Rappel wrote:
That sounds unnecessarily complicated. It's so easy to not draft, and there are so many benefits to being a full citizen, that I can't see why you would go that route.


I made aliyah. But many of people do not, in my high school many many girls in my class weren't citizens and were called by their passport numbers to receive their bagruyot tests since they didn't have an ID.

I don't really know how hard it is or if it's worth it for OP. I'm not familiar with the option up close and the details - I'm just aware many many people take that route and OP could find some more info if she would like and see if it's matim.
Back to top

Ruchel




 
 
 


Post  Tue, Oct 08 2019, 11:14 am
A charedi boy school with good chol is a thing. If not, you may have to do a mechina type or to do a degree through mail
Back to top
1, 2, 3, 4  Next  Last >> Recent Topics

Page 1 of 4 View latest: 24h 48h 72h


Post new topic   Reply to topic    Forum -> Inquiries & Offers -> Israel related Inquiries and Aliyah Questions

Related Topics Replies Last Post
Co-ed schools monsey
by amother
4 Today at 10:13 am View last post
Monsey Schools
by Dini
3 Yesterday at 5:19 pm View last post
Girls HIgh Schools 90 Wed, Nov 13 2019, 12:23 pm View last post
Innovative Jewish schools
by amother
1 Wed, Nov 13 2019, 8:02 am View last post
Did you/your child change schools? How old? How did it go?
by amother
9 Mon, Nov 04 2019, 9:01 am View last post

Jump to: