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How to dispose of leaky leftovers after bag ban?
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Amarante




 
 
 
 

Post  Thu, Jan 16 2020, 11:01 am
dankbar wrote:
for people saying buy a stroller with a larger basket obviously aren't into stroller fashion. Yes 20 years ago people pushed huge carriages with large baskets on the bottom. Today's strollers are so compact they hardly fit a baby in there lol


It is not difficult to transport UNFILLED reusable bags to the store. One just has to get into the habit of doing so.

Whatever means one used to get filled groceries home is the same whether one is using reusable bags or one is using free bags or if one is buying plastic bags each time one shops.

I still don't understand why using reusable bags makes it more difficult to actually bring groceries home.

One can carry a lightweight bag in one's purse or pocket or whatever for a spontaneous shopping trip. In my experience, most people don't spontaneously decide to do a huge grocery trip and worst case scenario for such an infrequent occurrence is that one purchases some bags to carry them home - those bags can then be used for future trips.

Except for remembering to bring bags - which one makes a habit after adjusting - the logistics of shlepping home are identical.
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amother




Maroon
 

Post  Thu, Jan 16 2020, 11:04 am
Amarante wrote:
In my experience, most people don't spontaneously decide to do a huge grocery trip

So you started by arguing in the alternative that it's both not an inconvenience and a manageable one, and now you're judging my lifestyle choices.
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Amarante




 
 
 
 

Post  Thu, Jan 16 2020, 11:05 am
amother [ OP ] wrote:
I've been following and noting the suggestions.
Basically it'll be a gross inconvenience to get rid of leftovers from now on. Plus, where I put my vegetable peels? Now I peel them into the bag, then throw the whole thing out. (That's an easier problem to solve, admittedly.)


Why do you need to put peels in a plastic bag?

If for some reason you are not close to your normal kitchen trash receptacle, use a small bowl when prepping and put all your prep garbage in there. Rachael Ray does this and calls it her garbage bowl.

As has been posted by others on this thread, the normal household has many receptacles that typically aren't recycled - cereal boxes, tin cans, cardboard containers that held frozen food. All of these items can be used if one is looking for some kind of container to hold debris before it goes into the large kitchen trash receptacle. They are also great if one has sloppy wet stuff and one wants to have an additional barrier although the reality is that kitchen liners are generally very strong and don't need the precaution.
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Mama Bear




 
 
 
 

Post  Thu, Jan 16 2020, 11:08 am
Amarante wrote:
It is not difficult to transport UNFILLED reusable bags to the store. One just has to get into the habit of doing so.

Whatever means one used to get filled groceries home is the same whether one is using reusable bags or one is using free bags or if one is buying plastic bags each time one shops.

I still don't understand why using reusable bags makes it more difficult to actually bring groceries home.

One can carry a lightweight bag in one's purse or pocket or whatever for a spontaneous shopping trip. In my experience, most people don't spontaneously decide to do a huge grocery trip and worst case scenario for such an infrequent occurrence is that one purchases some bags to carry them home - those bags can then be used for future trips.

Except for remembering to bring bags - which one makes a habit after adjusting - the logistics of shlepping home are identical.


it's the remembering. I have adhd. It's another task in my life to always remember to pack multiple reusable bags into my purse. What if I dont have enough? and there isnt that much room in my purse.

Yesterday this is what my errands day looked like:

I took 2 items to ship to the post office. in a shopping bag. Which I was able to throw out in the trash after I gave the packages to the post office. Okay, suppose it was in a reusable bag. I'd have to fold it up and smoosh it into my purse.

Then I went to the bakery and bought a few things. That's one more bag I'd have to remember to bring.

after that I went to the seforim/toy store and bought a game for shabbos. 2nd bag. it was a spontaneous idea. what if I didnt have another bag with me?

third, grocery order. took home a couple of items. That's a third bag I'd need.

lastly, hardware store, where I bought a gigantic plastic three-drawer unit my son needs. It was given to me in a GIGANTIC plastic bag. Why would I have that kid of size of reusable bag in my house at any given moment? or actually remember to have it with me?

It's just another burden on my head. I get overwhelmed easily. It'll be too hard to get used to.

Tomorrow iyh I have to go to the butcher store, bakery, fruit store, and post office again. Dyou think I'd even remember to pack enough reusable bags?

Things always get lost in my house. I'd never find the bags anyway. so....

amother [ OP ] wrote:
I've been following and noting the suggestions.
Basically it'll be a gross inconvenience to get rid of leftovers from now on. Plus, where I put my vegetable peels? Now I peel them into the bag, then throw the whole thing out. (That's an easier problem to solve, admittedly.)


use trash bags or counter liners.
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Amarante




 
 
 
 

Post  Thu, Jan 16 2020, 11:10 am
amother [ Maroon ] wrote:
So you started by arguing in the alternative that it's both not an inconvenience and a manageable one, and now you're judging my lifestyle choices.


I'm not judging lifestyle choices - I am pointing out that this "huge" inconvenience is really not a huge inconvenience.

It's an adjustment that people have made in many places.

All of these insurmountable obstacles that people are throwing out have no basis in reality.

My stating that most people don't make spontaneous grocery trips in which they buy a huge number of items was just stating the obvious. Most people pop into stores to pick up a few items. Most people plan large grocery trips because they want a list - they are planning menus etc. Therefore most of the time you don't need 15 shopping bags unexpectedly.
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amother




Maroon
 

Post  Thu, Jan 16 2020, 11:10 am
Amarante wrote:
As has been posted by others on this thread, the normal household has many receptacles that typically aren't recycled - cereal boxes, tin cans, cardboard containers that held frozen food.

Then why not, instead of banning bags, start recycling those very recyclable items?
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amother




OP
 

Post  Thu, Jan 16 2020, 11:10 am
Amarante wrote:
Why do you need to put peels in a plastic bag?

If for some reason you are not close to your normal kitchen trash receptacle, use a small bowl when prepping and put all your prep garbage in there. Rachael Ray does this and calls it her garbage bowl.

As has been posted by others on this thread, the normal household has many receptacles that typically aren't recycled - cereal boxes, tin cans, cardboard containers that held frozen food. All of these items can be used if one is looking for some kind of container to hold debris before it goes into the large kitchen trash receptacle. They are also great if one has sloppy wet stuff and one wants to have an additional barrier although the reality is that kitchen liners are generally very strong and don't need the precaution.


The kitchen liners I have (glad) do pierce and create a smelly, leaky mess on occasion which is why I avoid placing liquids directly inside.

Good for Rachael Ray- she has unlimited bowls and dishwasher space. I don't; and dirtying another bowl while it sounds minor can sometimes be a big hassle for me. I'll have no choice but to do it though. Or I can tear off paper towels but I don't see how that's better in terms of the environment than bags.

Cardboard boxes: I recycle them. (They contain crumbs and I don't want to keep them around.) tin cans: the only ones I have have been used for tomato sauce, canned fruits etc- and have sharp edges. I am not keeping these dangerous objects around.

Bending over the garbage is not an option for me- causes back pain (and endless frustration when the vegetable falls into the bin, and did it get dairy/meat contaminated by touching the garbage contained in the bin?).
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amother




Amethyst
 

Post  Thu, Jan 16 2020, 11:11 am
Amarante wrote:
It is not difficult to transport UNFILLED reusable bags to the store. One just has to get into the habit of doing so.

Whatever means one used to get filled groceries home is the same whether one is using reusable bags or one is using free bags or if one is buying plastic bags each time one shops.

I still don't understand why using reusable bags makes it more difficult to actually bring groceries home.

One can carry a lightweight bag in one's purse or pocket or whatever for a spontaneous shopping trip. In my experience, most people don't spontaneously decide to do a huge grocery trip and worst case scenario for such an infrequent occurrence is that one purchases some bags to carry them home - those bags can then be used for future trips.

Except for remembering to bring bags - which one makes a habit after adjusting - the logistics of shlepping home are identical.


Its more work. There are more tasks involved with using resusable bags, then using plastic.
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amother




Sienna
 

Post  Thu, Jan 16 2020, 11:27 am
Amarante wrote:


As has been posted by others on this thread, the normal household has many receptacles that typically aren't recycled - cereal boxes, tin cans, cardboard containers that held frozen food. All of these items can be used if one is looking for some kind of container to hold debris before it goes into the large kitchen trash receptacle. They are also great if one has sloppy wet stuff and one wants to have an additional barrier although the reality is that kitchen liners are generally very strong and don't need the precaution.

We recycle all of those things.
And I dont keep extra garbage containers in my home for future use of emptying more garbage into them. That's just gross and too much clutter.
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amother




Sienna
 

Post  Thu, Jan 16 2020, 11:40 am
Amarante wrote:
I'm not judging lifestyle choices - I am pointing out that this "huge" inconvenience is really not a huge inconvenience.

It's an adjustment that people have made in many places.

All of these insurmountable obstacles that people are throwing out have no basis in reality.

My stating that most people don't make spontaneous grocery trips in which they buy a huge number of items was just stating the obvious. Most people pop into stores to pick up a few items. Most people plan large grocery trips because they want a list - they are planning menus etc. Therefore most of the time you don't need 15 shopping bags unexpectedly.

Unrealistic is the idea that the efficiency of large grocery stores will go on hold while we all fish around for our 15 folded up nicely into tiny squares reusable cloth bags.
I won't be the surprised one when the stores don't change a thing except to charge us for our plastic bags.
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andrea levy




 
 
 
 

Post  Thu, Jan 16 2020, 11:54 am
Mama Bear wrote:
THe ban makes zero sense! How am I supposed to take *anything* with me outdoors? I'm not going to start toting around big brown paper bags. I need bags that I can tie closed, like a shopping bag. So the grocery store won't give me shopping bags, I'll just use whatever I saved up.
I can't lug home multiple bags from the grocery store, butcher store, fish store, toy store, hardware store, pharmacy, etc etc etc in bulky paper bags.
We do errands on foot in my neighborhood, not with a car. I can't lug around big paper bags.


Use reusable shopping bags. What do you think they did before plastic?
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amother




Amethyst
 

Post  Thu, Jan 16 2020, 11:57 am
amother [ Sienna ] wrote:
Unrealistic is the idea that the efficiency of large grocery stores will go on hold while we all fish around for our 15 folded up nicely into tiny squares reusable cloth bags.
I won't be the surprised one when the stores don't change a thing except to charge us for our plastic bags.


Except that "we all" won't be fishing around for 15 nicely folded up tiny squares of resusable cloth bags. That's like suggesting that all people who shop get to the cash and waste everyone's time by fishing through their bag for a wallet, and then fish through the wallet for a credit card.
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amother




Lawngreen
 

Post  Thu, Jan 16 2020, 12:02 pm
Mama Bear wrote:

THe ban makes zero sense! How am I supposed to take *anything* with me outdoors? I'm not going to start toting around big brown paper bags. I need bags that I can tie closed, like a shopping bag. So the grocery store won't give me shopping bags, I'll just use whatever I saved up.
I can't lug home multiple bags from the grocery store, butcher store, fish store, toy store, hardware store, pharmacy, etc etc etc in bulky paper bags.
We do errands on foot in my neighborhood, not with a car. I can't lug around big paper bags.



andrea levy wrote:
Use reusable shopping bags. What do you think they did before plastic?


I shall confess that I'm one of those who will struggle to remember to bring my bags with me. Hopefully, though, it will become routine over time.

But in MB's case, I think that the reusable bags will actually help her, once she acclimates. Carrying several plastic shopping bags hurts my hands and arms, and is generally a PITA. So I often used to carry a backpack with me, to put the parcels in. Or at least a bag with a shoulder strap. Its a lot easier on my hands and arms.
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amother




Lawngreen
 

Post  Thu, Jan 16 2020, 12:03 pm
andrea levy wrote:
Use reusable shopping bags. What do you think they did before plastic?


We used paper.

Reusable might have been before that.
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amother




Sienna
 

Post  Thu, Jan 16 2020, 12:08 pm
amother [ Amethyst ] wrote:
Except that "we all" won't be fishing around for 15 nicely folded up tiny squares of resusable cloth bags. That's like suggesting that all people who shop get to the cash and waste everyone's time by fishing through their bag for a wallet, and then fish through the wallet for a credit card.

No, credit cards and prepaid $ on a grocery account both are much faster than counting out cash.

The stores try to get the customers through checkout and out of the store asap.
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amother




Amethyst
 

Post  Thu, Jan 16 2020, 12:23 pm
amother [ Sienna ] wrote:
No, credit cards and prepaid $ on a grocery account both are much faster than counting out cash.

The stores try to get the customers through checkout and out of the store asap.


I think you missed my point.

Most people who grocery shop don't waste everyone's time digging through their bag to find a wallet and then find a credit card. They are prepared for the task of paying.

Same way that most people who bring in their own bags to the grocery have a system to make sure that the bags are ready to be filled in a timely fashion.
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amother




Teal
 

Post  Thu, Jan 16 2020, 12:24 pm
I’m not happy about it, but I recognize im going to need to buy bags now. Any recommendations of good ones that fold up small to buy online ? Need to be washable and cheap enough to buy a bunch (I generally need 8-10 bags per grocery order but need extra to keep in the car and diaper bag too).


In terms of bags to throw out stuff: look into diaper or doggy waste bags. They’re generally pretty cheap per bag.
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southernbubby




 
 
 
 

Post  Thu, Jan 16 2020, 12:26 pm
amother [ Lawngreen ] wrote:
We used paper.

Reusable might have been before that.


Baskets
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dankbar




 
 
 
 

Post  Sun, Jan 19 2020, 5:19 pm
What? they didn't need to go to the stores!

The chickens layed the eggs in their yard, which you packed into your cloth napkin or your own skirt. You took your pail & milked your own cow. You took your bucket & went to the well & filled it with water. If you were lazy you had the milkman or water carrier bring it to your door. To wash laundry at the river you either took in your hand your single dress if it was in your yard or you purchased a huge wicker basket from your next door neighbor & stuffed clothes in there, if you were lazy you hired a "vesherke" a laundry lady

You cut your own fruit & veg from your yard, placed it into a wooden cart, or ripped off a single apple & bit into it.

For heavier loads you loaded into your wagon attached to your horse
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southernbubby




 
 
 
 

Post  Sun, Jan 19 2020, 5:25 pm
dankbar wrote:
What? they didn't need to go to the stores!

The chickens layed the eggs in their yard, which you packed into your cloth napkin or your own skirt. You took your pail & milked your own cow. You took your bucket & went to the well & filled it with water. If you were lazy you had the milkman or water carrier bring it to your door. To wash laundry at the river you either took in your hand your single dress if it was in your yard or you purchased a huge wicker basket from your next door neighbor & stuffed clothes in there, if you were lazy you hired a "vesherke" a laundry lady

You cut your own fruit & veg from your yard, placed it into a wooden cart, or ripped off a single apple & bit into it.

For heavier loads you loaded into your wagon attached to your horse


My great grandma took a basket to the produce market.
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