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Non jews wearing yarmulkes

 
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yo'ma




 
 
 
 

Post  Fri, Jan 24 2020, 7:19 am
I don’t care so much if they do, but I don’t understand it. When a non jew goes to a holy place, either they’re given or ask to wear one. You see it often in photos. Wearing a covering on the head is not cultural that they might have to show respect, but religious. A non jew has absolutely no religious obligation to do so and to wear one without even understanding the meaning behind it is less respectful in my opinion. What do you think?

I don’t care, but I do notice and it makes me wonder.
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amother




Turquoise
 

Post  Fri, Jan 24 2020, 7:22 am
yo'ma wrote:
I don’t care so much if they do, but I don’t understand it. When a non jew goes to a holy place, either they’re given or ask to wear one. You see it often in photos. Wearing a covering on the head is not cultural that they might have to show respect, but religious. A non jew has absolutely no religious obligation to do so and to wear one without even understanding the meaning behind it is less respectful in my opinion. What do you think?

I don’t care, but I do notice and it makes me wonder.


So why does the pope wear a red kippah
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chicco




 
 
 
 

Post  Fri, Jan 24 2020, 7:23 am
I always thought the non Jew asks to wear one because they believe it is respectful. Obviously it is a misunderstanding. I did not realize that Jews ever gave them out or requested non Jews to wear them. I guess in that situation the Jews are also misunderstanding.
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amother




Lawngreen
 

Post  Fri, Jan 24 2020, 7:26 am
I always wonder that as well, especially at the kotel.

And someone got mad at my non-Jewish brother in law for not wearing a kippah at our wedding. He was just sitting there, not even standing near the chuppah or anything
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DrMom




 
 
 
 

Post  Fri, Jan 24 2020, 7:32 am
They think they are being respectful, like someone who takes off his shoes before entering a mosque or Buddhist temple.

I remember when we were travelling and visiting some historic and non-operational synagogue in Europe and our guide handed my husband, who was wearing a broad-brimmed sun hat (with a kipah underneath), to please put on one of the shiny satin kipot from the basket at the entranceway, "as a sign of respect in a Jewish holy place."
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Ruchel




 
 
 
 

Post  Fri, Jan 24 2020, 7:39 am
Many less frum people give them out at smachos, collector kippa etc and they give everyone
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zaq




 
 
 
 

Post  Fri, Jan 24 2020, 8:42 am
DrMom wrote:
our guide handed my husband, who was wearing a broad-brimmed sun hat (with a kipah underneath), to please put on one of the shiny satin kipot from the basket at the entranceway, "as a sign of respect in a Jewish holy place."


That’s hilarious!
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amother




Maroon
 

Post  Fri, Jan 24 2020, 8:43 am
I have both non frum and non Jewish family, so when I or my parents make a Simcha, we always have the kippahs out for the sake of the non frum relatives, because obviously the relatives who are actually not Jewish don't have to wear them. However, they usually do, because they feel it's the respectful thing to do. In fact, my non Jewish relatives will pop on a kippah right away, without anyone telling them to, where as the Jewish but not frum relatives have to be politely asked, lol.
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zaq




 
 
 
 

Post  Fri, Jan 24 2020, 8:45 am
amother [ Lawngreen ] wrote:
I always wonder that as well, especially at the kotel.

And someone got mad at my non-Jewish brother in law for not wearing a kippah at our wedding. He was just sitting there, not even standing near the chuppah or anything


Your bil was attending a Jewish wedding. Why would anyone think he’s not Jewish?
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amother




Orchid
 

Post  Fri, Jan 24 2020, 9:02 am
They do it out of respect because they THINK it IS the respectful thing to do. I don't see why you would get upset because people are trying to be respectful, even if they aren't quite understanding the significance. Many of my non-Jewish family wore kippot at my wedding - I even bought special ones for my Father and Uncles who were holding the chuppah poles - even though I explained that they weren't obligated. I appreciate that they want to be respectful. In Christianity, they don't really have the concept that some people are obligated to do things while others are not, so I can see how it doesn't really click for them. It's very standard in any religion to do as others do to show respect.
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amother




Slateblue
 

Post  Fri, Jan 24 2020, 9:04 am
amother [ Maroon ] wrote:
I have both non frum and non Jewish family, so when I or my parents make a Simcha, we always have the kippahs out for the sake of the non frum relatives, because obviously the relatives who are actually not Jewish don't have to wear them. However, they usually do, because they feel it's the respectful thing to do. In fact, my non Jewish relatives will pop on a kippah right away, without anyone telling them to, where as the Jewish but not frum relatives have to be politely asked, lol.


Same here.
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FranticFrummie




 
 
 
 

Post  Fri, Jan 24 2020, 9:10 am
I think it's cultural, and as long it's not mocking or hurting anyone, what's the big deal? It's a lovely gesture.

Sometimes I tease the taxi drivers in Israel. I'll get one who is talking about how much he loves Israel, and I'll say "Nu, afo kippa?" (where's your kippa?" He'll say "ani lo dati" (I'm not religious).

My answer is, you're a Jew, so you're religious. Go buy a kippa! I always say it with a sweet smile, so they take it well. Who knows, maybe some day they will?

Taxi drivers can be so sweet. I had one totally secular driver brag to me about how he doesn't smoke on Shabbos. I told him that he's a religious Jew and he kept insisting he wasn't.

ETA: I realize this was the total opposite of the title of the thread. I was just making a random observation. My brain is random today. Carry on! Very Happy
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amother




Lawngreen
 

Post  Sat, Jan 25 2020, 2:15 pm
zaq wrote:
Your bil was attending a Jewish wedding. Why would anyone think he’s not Jewish?


but even if he was Jewish, why is it their business? we got married at a hotel, not a shul.
and he was obviously part of the wedding psrty so not having a kippah on was deliberate
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yo'ma




 
 
 
 

Post  Sun, Jan 26 2020, 8:03 am
amother [ Orchid ] wrote:
They do it out of respect because they THINK it IS the respectful thing to do. I don't see why you would get upset because people are trying to be respectful, even if they aren't quite understanding the significance. Many of my non-Jewish family wore kippot at my wedding - I even bought special ones for my Father and Uncles who were holding the chuppah poles - even though I explained that they weren't obligated. I appreciate that they want to be respectful. In Christianity, they don't really have the concept that some people are obligated to do things while others are not, so I can see how it doesn't really click for them. It's very standard in any religion to do as others do to show respect.

If you read my op I am not upset, but not understanding. Got my answer and what I figured.
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amother




Orchid
 

Post  Sun, Jan 26 2020, 9:40 am
yo'ma wrote:
If you read my op I am not upset, but not understanding. Got my answer and what I figured.


Sorry, I was actually thinking of others who I have heard being upset about it.
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