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"Donations will be tripled by a generous person"

 
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amother




OP
 

Post  Thu, Jun 18 2020, 10:48 am
I see there's a campaign going on for a very worthy cause. There ad says that all donations will be tripled by a wealthy generous person.

Does this statement want to make you give more or less? On one hand if I give $100 someone will be adding an additional $300 on top. That's awesome.
On the other hand the organization is obviously connected to a mega wealthy philanthropist who is prepared to give millions of dollars just like that. Do they really need my $100? Wouldn't my money be better served going to a yeshiva or organization that doesn't have a multi millionaire helping them out like this?
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amother




cornflower
 

Post  Thu, Jun 18 2020, 11:08 am
It's a very common incentive for all kinds of donations.

At least for me, it's somewhat of a motivation to give at that particular time but only if it would be something I would donate to without the incentive.

I don't think of it as being INSTEAD of the "rich" person being able to donate more but just as a way to maximize whatever the person's donation is by using it to incentivize other donors.

At any rate, I don't check to see if my donation was actually matched so it really doesn't matter to me.
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SuperWify




 
 
 
 

Post  Thu, Jun 18 2020, 11:12 am
My question is who is the rich person tripling all donations for every single organization?
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amother




Silver
 

Post  Thu, Jun 18 2020, 11:16 am
amother [ OP ] wrote:
I see there's a campaign going on for a very worthy cause. There ad says that all donations will be tripled by a wealthy generous person.

Does this statement want to make you give more or less? On one hand if I give $100 someone will be adding an additional $300 on top. That's awesome.
On the other hand the organization is obviously connected to a mega wealthy philanthropist who is prepared to give millions of dollars just like that. Do they really need my $100? Wouldn't my money be better served going to a yeshiva or organization that doesn't have a multi millionaire helping them out like this?


If you are deciding what to do with $100 - don't let the perception that your $100 really means $400 for charity A and $100 for charity B - be a factor in where you donate.

Your $100 is $100. Give where you want to give.

(also on the bolded - you have no idea what negotiations went on in the background.)
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amother




Dodgerblue
 

Post  Thu, Jun 18 2020, 11:17 am
SuperWify wrote:
My question is who is the rich person tripling all donations for every single organization?


It’s typically someone who would give the donation anyways. Or a pool of ppl.
The organization asks to use the money as an incentive to get ppl to donate to the campaign. But these ppl would give anyways.
The all or nothing campaigns are similar. Ppl who would give anyways are lined up to give just in case the campaign falls short - but the orgs would rather not have to go to them because they want the money another time.
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aliavi




 
 
 
 

Post  Thu, Jun 18 2020, 11:23 am
Don’t give begrudgingly. Do only what you can and you’re happy to do. Your dollar goes further with matching and that’s a great thing for any Jewish organization. Who cares who is matching? If the matchers wanted to make a public donation they would.
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out-of-towner




 
 
 
 

Post  Thu, Jun 18 2020, 12:01 pm
My husband was asked to commit to being part of a group of people for a matching champain. It ended up being a commitment of around $18 for a few years, which was doable and he was happy to participate. So it could be a number of people committing to give donations over a period of time, not one person giving one flat sum.
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amother




Cobalt
 

Post  Thu, Jun 18 2020, 12:09 pm
amother [ Dodgerblue ] wrote:
It’s typically someone who would give the donation anyways. Or a pool of ppl.
The organization asks to use the money as an incentive to get ppl to donate to the campaign. But these ppl would give anyways. The all or nothing campaigns are similar. Ppl who would give anyways are lined up to give just in case the campaign falls short - but the orgs would rather not have to go to them because they want the money another time.

The bolded is not always true. Maybe for some frum organizations, but not always. Even people who are wealthy don't like to waste their money funding an organization that lacks any grassroots support or doesn't bother with a serious fundraising effort. Pledging to match instead of outright addresses this concern.
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amother




Purple
 

Post  Thu, Jun 18 2020, 12:31 pm
I work for a philanthropic foundation. We give grants. These are knows as challenge grants. The idea is to use these to broaden your donor base. And it works! These challenge grants are extremely effective in reaching new donors who then overwhelmingly tend to continue donating.

The foundation I work for awards this type of grant for various reasons. We look through their list of donors over a certain amount every year and at the past 3 years of donors at which level. When we see that the org has become stagnant or the development department needs a boost, we do a challenge grant. And the orgs are extremely grateful because it works.
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rmbg




 
 
 
 

Post  Thu, Jun 18 2020, 12:48 pm
Many times big donors want to see that the organization is not relying only on them and they have a bigger donor base. So they challenge them with a matching donation on the condition they raise other money. It’s quite common.
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amother




Purple
 

Post  Thu, Jun 18 2020, 12:58 pm
rmbg wrote:
Many times big donors want to see that the organization is not relying only on them and they have a bigger donor base. So they challenge them with a matching donation on the condition they raise other money. It’s quite common.

BINGO. One org is a long time grantee of ours and they are considered a legacy grantee by the oldest living donor so we can not stop giving to them. But they use us like an ATM machine. So we changed to Challenge grants.

Another org we give to is very controversial and have a very hard time finding new donors, but as long as they have the family I work for in their pocket, they have no motivation to find more. So we do challenge grants for them too, and it worked. They had to get $30,000 from new donors of gifts $500 or more and THEY DID.
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amother




Dodgerblue
 

Post  Thu, Jun 18 2020, 12:59 pm
amother [ Cobalt ] wrote:
The bolded is not always true. Maybe for some frum organizations, but not always. Even people who are wealthy don't like to waste their money funding an organization that lacks any grassroots support or doesn't bother with a serious fundraising effort. Pledging to match instead of outright addresses this concern.


I meant like a school with steady donors.
They know a parent gives 25k a year to the school. So will ask to give to matching campaign instead of to dinner campaign.

But it’s true what you said. It makes the donor feel like he is getting more bang for his buck so he may give more.
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amother




Cerulean
 

Post  Thu, Jun 18 2020, 4:13 pm
If the donation is tripled, then your $100 becomes $300. Mr Generous is adding $200.

Just sayin'.
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amother




Lilac
 

Post  Fri, Jun 19 2020, 8:21 am
My only problem is when the same organization calls for a donation the following year and they tell me - last year you gave $300. I think to myself - I gave $300? It's not really an organization I hold that dear to my heart. Then I realize that I really gave $100 and they are telling me the tripled 'effective' amount. A bit dishonest and manipulative way to get you to give more money - I expect more from a tzedakah organization.
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FranticFrummie




 
 
 
 

Post  Fri, Jun 19 2020, 10:38 am
This is a very interesting thread. I've often wondered if the "matching donations" even existed, or if it was just a clever marketing ploy to encourage people to donate.

It's nice to know that there are people or groups who are actually behind these campaigns.

I don't like being cynical, but live has often taught me otherwise. I'm happy to be wrong on this one.
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zaq




 
 
 
 

Post  Sun, Jun 28 2020, 7:51 pm
It's a clever gimmick. I could be 100% wrong, but I highly doubt that an entity willing to donate up to ______ dollars would fail to donate them because the charity didn't manage to raise the full sum.

Now if you were talking about a business, I could see a potential investor saying 'Show me that you're capable of raising $X and I'll match it, but if you can't scrape together that sum, the deal is off." Because the point of running a biz is to make money, and if you can't raise money at the outset, why should an investor think you could do it at all?
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amother




Indigo
 

Post  Sun, Jun 28 2020, 8:15 pm
am always happy if my donation is multiplied
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