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Abgoosht, Persian Chicken Soup with Gundi (Chickpea Dumpling

 
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Amarante




 
 
 
 

Post  Mon, Sep 07 2020, 1:12 pm
This was an interesting variant on chicken with matzo ball soup or chicken soup with dumplings. Joan Nathan's cookbook has some really interesting recipes from Jewish communities around the world. Especially interesting are recipes that are from unexpected places like Cuba and India.

It's really like making chicken soup with different seasonings and making balls for the soup the way one would make more traditional matzoh balls or meat balls using chickpea flour as a binder

Abgoosht, Persian Chicken Soup with Gundi (Chickpea Dumplings)

Excerpt From: Joan Nathan. “King Solomon's Table

Although the food of Iranian Muslims and Jews is essentially the same, except that Jews don’t use butter with meat, there is at least one specifically Jewish dish in Iran. Served at the start of Sabbath dinners for centuries, gundi are plump chicken and chickpea dumplings flavored with cardamom and tinted with turmeric, then cooked in chicken broth. Gundi are delicious, evocative, satisfying, and a must on Friday night.

In Iran, men would traditionally come home from synagogue on Friday night and drink a little arrack, and sometimes eat the gundi alone as an appetizer, without soup. Gundi are often served rolled up in a piece of flat lavash, taftan, or sangaak bread, with scallions and a big plate of sabzi (fresh herbs), with the soup eaten on the side. I prefer tiny gundi to the typical golf ball size, and I also prefer eating these dumplings in the soup.

For the gluten-free, these are your dumplings!

yield: 8 servings

BROTH

One 3-pound (1⅓-kilo) chicken, cut in 8 pieces, separating at least ¼ pound (113 grams) of the breast
2 large onions, peeled and diced
1 clove garlic
1 sweet green pepper, thinly sliced
1 sweet red pepper, thinly sliced
1 sweet yellow pepper, thinly sliced
1 tablespoon sea salt, or to taste
½ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper, or to taste
½ teaspoon ground cardamom, or to taste
½ teaspoon ground turmeric, or to taste
1 cup cooked chickpeas (see this page) from ½ cup dried or from half a 15-ounce (213-gram) can
Juice of 1 lemon

GUNDI (chicken and chickpea dumplings)

2 medium onions, peeled and quartered
4 ounces (113 grams) skinless, boneless chicken breast (from chicken above)
4 ounces/113 grams (about 1 cup plus 2 tablespoons) chickpea flour
1 tablespoon olive oil
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper, or to taste
¼ teaspoon ground turmeric
½ teaspoon ground cardamom, or to taste
½ teaspoon ground cumin
14 cups chicken broth (from above)
Handful each of finely chopped basil, parsley, mint, and cilantro

1.to make the broth Set aside the breast and put the rest of the chicken in a large soup pot with a lid and cover with water. Bring to a boil and remove any froth that accumulates.

2.Add the onions, garlic, peppers, salt, freshly ground pepper, cardamom, and turmeric. Simmer, covered, for 40 minutes or until the chicken is almost cooked. Add the chickpeas and continue cooking until the chicken is done. Squeeze in the juice of a lemon. Cool and strain the soup, reserving the chicken for a salad or putting chunks into the broth and returning the peppers and chickpeas to the broth. You should have at least 14 cups of broth.

3.to make the gundi Using a food processor fitted with a steel blade, pulse onions until finely chopped. Transfer to a bowl and set aside. Then pulse the chicken until it has the consistency of ground meat.

4.Mix the onions and chickpea flour in a medium bowl until well combined. Add the ground chicken, oil, salt, pepper, turmeric, cardamom, and cumin. Mix well, adding a bit of water if needed to make dough about the consistency of meatballs. Refrigerate until well chilled, about 3 hours.

5.Dip your hands in cold water and make balls about the size of a walnut—you should have about 20 portions. Bring the soup to a boil, then gently add the dumplings one at a time. Simmer, covered, for 15 to 20 minutes, until the dumplings are cooked completely. Meanwhile, in a small bowl, toss together the basil, parsley, mint, and cilantro.

6.Ladle the soup and dumplings into serving bowls, sprinkling with the mixed herbs.
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BatyaEsther




 
 
 
 

Post  Mon, Sep 07 2020, 1:26 pm
I've said it before and I will say it again.
I'm coming to you for dinner!
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Amarante




 
 
 
 

Post  Mon, Sep 07 2020, 1:31 pm
BatyaEsther wrote:
I've said it before and I will say it again.
I'm coming to you for dinner!


I'm having fun just reading this Joan Nathan cookbook. Almost every recipe has interesting historical notes explaining how she found the recipe - the people who introduced her to the recipe and/or just how the Jewish community settled into the location and how the *traditional* recipes became shaped by the foods around them.

She had a recipe for a Sweet & Sour Cabbage that was originally probably from the Ukraine but was served to her by a woman from the Cuban Jewish community. The notes written by her indicated that the original source of the "sour" would have been tamarind since it predated the introduction of tomatoes which made sense. I know that tomatoes were considered to be poison until relatively recently.
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dovebird




 
 
 
 

Post  Mon, Sep 07 2020, 3:29 pm
I’ve never seen (or tasted) ubgoosgt with peppers! So interesting! Didnt know it was a thing
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ChanieMommy




 
 
 
 

Post  Mon, Sep 07 2020, 3:42 pm
Thank you. Sounds great!!!
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ChanieMommy




 
 
 
 

Post  Mon, Sep 07 2020, 3:44 pm
Amarante wrote:
I'm having fun just reading this Joan Nathan cookbook. Almost every recipe has interesting historical notes explaining how she found the recipe - the people who introduced her to the recipe and/or just how the Jewish community settled into the location and how the *traditional* recipes became shaped by the foods around them.

She had a recipe for a Sweet & Sour Cabbage that was originally probably from the Ukraine but was served to her by a woman from the Cuban Jewish community. The notes written by her indicated that the original source of the "sour" would have been tamarind since it predated the introduction of tomatoes which made sense. I know that tomatoes were considered to be poison until relatively recently.

a (persian) friend of mind always used tamarind for fried eggplant slices in tomato sauce...
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Amarante




 
 
 
 

Post  Mon, Sep 07 2020, 4:44 pm
dovebird wrote:
I’ve never seen (or tasted) ubgoosgt with peppers! So interesting! Didnt know it was a thing


A Persian woman PM'ed me with her recipe for this dish. It is always interesting to be able to compare "home" recipes from authentic sources with versions that are in cookbooks.

I grew up with my Bubbe's version of Ashkenazi food. What I find is that restaurant versions of the classic dishes just don't compare as well to good homemade versions and I suspect that is probably true of Sephardic food as well.

There is a Persian rice dish with very crispy rice on the bottom which is delicious - even the restaurant version Very Happy
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