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Night training 8 yr old for first time
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amother




OP
 

Post Wed, Jan 13 2021, 7:43 pm
DC is 8 and we never tried to train her for thr night for various reasons. Now she really wants it, but how do I do it? I baught the alarm, it doesnt seem to wake her and she doesnt either put it back if it does. We wake her once at night so far.
Is therr something else that can wake her up better? Or how often do I wake her? What else can I do.
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amother




Burgundy
 

Post Wed, Jan 13 2021, 7:47 pm
Why do you think she can’t hold her urine overnight? Does she wake up with wet diaper/pull ups?
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amother




Indigo
 

Post Wed, Jan 13 2021, 7:50 pm
No drinking before bed & bathroom before bed. Don't wake her at night, she'll hopefully get used to being dry all night.
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-Sunnygirl




 
 
 
 

Post Wed, Jan 13 2021, 7:57 pm
try taking her to the bathroom before she goes to bed and take her again before you go to bed as late as possible. also try to limit drinks 1 hr before she goes to sleep. Hatzlacha!!
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avrahamama




 
 
 
 

Post Wed, Jan 13 2021, 8:01 pm
I vaguely remember reading in Rabbi Keleman book that bedwetting for girls can be a hormonal thing, and it sometimes takes till 12 yrs old.
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amother




Gray
 

Post Wed, Jan 13 2021, 8:50 pm
amother [ OP ] wrote:
DC is 8 and we never tried to train her for thr night for various reasons. Now she really wants it, but how do I do it? I baught the alarm, it doesnt seem to wake her and she doesnt either put it back if it does. We wake her once at night so far.
Is therr something else that can wake her up better? Or how often do I wake her? What else can I do.

I bribed my son to get out of the bed to use the bathroom one last time. I rewarded him even if he woke up wet. he hated doing it because he was all cozy already, but he understood why it was important, each week he picked a treat for doing it.
I saw results right away.
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amother




OP
 

Post Wed, Jan 13 2021, 9:11 pm
Her pull ups are very wet in the morning
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amother




Indigo
 

Post Wed, Jan 13 2021, 10:10 pm
amother [ OP ] wrote:
Her pull ups are very wet in the morning


Maybe she feels secure in her pull up and doesn't have the pressure to stay dry. If she goes to sleep without a pull up, she'll have the pressure of staying dry and her body will get used to it.
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amother




Ruby
 

Post Wed, Jan 13 2021, 10:18 pm
I'm dealing with the same now, just mine is a boy.
My son has been wearing pull ups. This week we stated a new trial. He goes to bed in underwear and I'm hoping that after a week or two (or maybe 3 or 4) of wetting his bed every night, eventually it will bother him enough that he'll wake up.
We're trying....
I wonder, though, why do they need to go to the bathroom at night? On the average night, I don't get up to go to the bathroom.
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amother




Wine
 

Post Wed, Jan 13 2021, 10:19 pm
My dd wasn’t ready till 8.
My pediatrician said don’t do alarms, don’t do waking her during the night.
We just kept her in pull ups. I don’t recommend taking away the pull ups if she’s very wet in the morning -
As long as- she goes right before bed and right when waking up in the toilet so you know it’s all from sleep time.
To be continued
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amother




Wine
 

Post Wed, Jan 13 2021, 10:50 pm
What worked for us was putting a potty next to her bed and encouraging her to use that rather than shlep to the bathroom. It really helped BH but only because she was biologically ready.
We were very much not pressuring, but we set a goal for her to be trained by 8 years old.

We also told her she could host a sleepover once she was dry and using the toilet (not potty) at night.

And at some point we put a good nights pad on her bed- I guess when we made the transition to underwear - but we didn’t do that till she was already dry,
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flowerpower




 
 
 
 

Post Wed, Jan 13 2021, 10:54 pm
1- no drinking for a for a good hour or two before bed
2- use the bathroom right before bed
3- take her to the bathroom 2 hrs once shes sleeping
4- no pull ups!!! Its a safe haven to go
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toysrus




 
 
 
 

Post Thu, Jan 14 2021, 7:03 am
Kids generally have a longer night than us adults thats why they need to use thebathroom in middle of night
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amother




Fuchsia
 

Post Thu, Jan 14 2021, 10:20 am
flowerpower wrote:
1- no drinking for a for a good hour or two before bed
2- use the bathroom right before bed
3- take her to the bathroom 2 hrs once shes sleeping
4- no pull ups!!! Its a safe haven to go


I would add:

5) use the alarm. and the child must come wake you up each time the alarm rings. Then you can be on top of her splashing her face

6) when you wake her two hours after she fell asleep, make sure she is fully up by having HER splash her face with water at the bathroom sink right before she uses the toilet. This advice I got from an expert in this line.

7) make a chart with stickers and reward the child after she is dry for 4 weeks in a row.

8) make sure there is sufficient light in the bathroom and on the way to the bathroom all night. There should be a night lamp in the child's room on all night.

9) the bed the child sleeps in should be firm. If the mattress is not firm enough, put a plywood under it to help with the firmness.

10) this advice the expert gave me only after all the above didn't work: have the child drink tons of drinks right before bed when she's all ready to go into bed. Naturally she will need to use the bathroom. Do not let her go. Instead, have her lie in her bed as if she's sleeping. She must imagine she is sleeping really tight and her eyes should be closed. Stay that way for 2 minute. Then she should imagine she's waking up in middle of this deep deep sleep. She should then go to the bathroom sink, splash her face and proceed to the toilet.

I paid thousands for an expert and these are the basics. The last one is what finally made my child stop bed wetting after months of doing all 9.
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amother




Indigo
 

Post Thu, Jan 14 2021, 10:38 am
toysrus wrote:
Kids generally have a longer night than us adults thats why they need to use thebathroom in middle of night


I think that most kids don't need to go to the bathroom in middle of the night.
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amother




OP
 

Post Thu, Jan 14 2021, 11:30 am
Thank you all for the advice!! Another thing she mentioned to me is that when she wakes up she can't fall back asleep. (Honestly part of the reasons I didn't train her yet)
Last night she refused to go, dh woke her, but she was adamant she is too tired.
Pull up is definitely a safe haven, yet I really dont think she is capable of holding it in all night she didnt learn the muscle yet. Only thing, if she wakes up all wet maybe maybe she will go use the bathroom.

She also says the alarm doesnt wake her up. Anyone know of a stronger/lauder alarm system? Maybe with a vibrating pad? That's not so easy to ignore
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#BestBubby




 
 
 
 

Post Thu, Jan 14 2021, 11:40 am
Get a waterproof mattress protector.

Then take away pull ups.

leave dry sheet and dry pjs near bed.

If she wets she will wake up uncomfortable.

Tell her she must strip her bed herself, change her pjs and flip the blanket over -
No Waking up parents for help.

The hassle of having to change in middle of night may motivate her to get up and use
the bathroom instead of ignoring nature's call.
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amother




Indigo
 

Post Thu, Jan 14 2021, 11:58 am
#BestBubby wrote:
Get a waterproof mattress protector.

Then take away pull ups.

leave dry sheet and dry pjs near bed.

If she wets she will wake up uncomfortable.

Tell her she must strip her bed herself, change her pjs and flip the blanket over -
No Waking up parents for help.

The hassle of having to change in middle of night may motivate her to get up and use
the bathroom instead of ignoring nature's call.


This. She won't learn to be capable of holding it in all night as long as she's wearing a pull up. Get rid of the pull up and put a plastic or waterproof mattress under her sheet. She might wet the first few days but she'll hopefully get used to being dry sooner rather than later. It's impossible at that age to learn to wake up dry if she wears a pull up to bed every night, it's teaching her to be lazy about it. I like the idea of her having to change herself if she wakes wet at night.
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amother




Chocolate
 

Post Thu, Jan 14 2021, 1:12 pm
toysrus wrote:
Kids generally have a longer night than us adults thats why they need to use thebathroom in middle of night
ideally the autonomic nervous system makes sure we don’t urinate at night. anti diuretic hormone rises at and urine production slows, and the nervous system makes sure the bladder muscles hold in whatever urine is in there until morning. That’s why supporting the autonomic nervous system is so important for night training. Magnesium and thiamine are essential. B12 deficiency has also been linked to enuresis, likely via the nervous system. And making sure there are no chronic infections and other sources of inflammation, as those are big causes of stress on the nervous system.
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amother




Wine
 

Post Thu, Jan 14 2021, 2:38 pm
Also my pediatrician said if a kid is constipated it makes night training more difficult so if that’s an issue, treat that first.
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