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Poll

Do you keep Hebrew name on birth certificate?
Yes  
 82%  [ 114 ]
No  
 17%  [ 25 ]
Total Votes : 139


amother




OP
 

Post Tue, Jun 22 2021, 4:08 am
Do you put the Hebrew name on the birth certificate or do you put an English one.
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Teomima




 
 
 
 

Post Tue, Jun 22 2021, 4:25 am
My children all have just their Hebrew names, for US and Israeli passports. It's not as big of a deal for them since we lived in Israel, but I grew up in the States and also only have a Hebrew name and I like it. I was (am!) unique.
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hodeez




 
 
 
 

Post Tue, Jun 22 2021, 5:59 am
my kids have only Jewish names on all documentation
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amother




Aubergine
 

Post Tue, Jun 22 2021, 6:04 am
I usually anglesize the name somewhat. My dh and his siblings grew up with their full hebrew names as legal names and they hated it. Non-jews can't pronounce the name, spell the name etc, so when they go to the dr or anything it's always harder.
It depends on the names as well. My kids names are fairly traditional and easy to switch, think Simon for Shimon, Michael for Michoel etc, but it can be harder when they're more unusual names. You could also do a shortened form of the name, like Eli, which is hard to get wrong.
I don't know if I would do a totally different name though, like Eve instead of Chava.
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amother




Lightgreen
 

Post Tue, Jun 22 2021, 6:05 am
Israel only lets you put their Hebrew name. I.e., Hebrew and English have to match. The only leeway is that if your name is רבקה, they will let you choose between Rivka and Rebecca, and יעקוב can be Yaakov or Jacob, etc.

But they wont let you do Chaim in Hebrew and Charley in English.
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Teomima




 
 
 
 

Post Tue, Jun 22 2021, 6:34 am
amother [ Lightgreen ] wrote:
Israel only lets you put their Hebrew name. I.e., Hebrew and English have to match. The only leeway is that if your name is רבקה, they will let you choose between Rivka and Rebecca, and יעקוב can be Yaakov or Jacob, etc.

But they wont let you do Chaim in Hebrew and Charley in English.

Though if your child has dual citizenship, they can have different names on their passports, as long as their tickets have both names. Dh had this issue for years before he formally changed his English name to his Hebrew name. At one point his ticket had to have six different names (including middle names)!
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amother




Dustypink
 

Post Tue, Jun 22 2021, 6:43 am
amother [ Aubergine ] wrote:

I don't know if I would do a totally different name though, like Eve instead of Chava.


I know someone who had this, but her parents didn't like the name Eve, so she was Yvonne. She always used an abbreviation of her middle name instead, but sometimes ran into difficulties with airline tickets when she forgot which name to use.
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amother




Springgreen
 

Post Tue, Jun 22 2021, 6:45 am
amother [ Lightgreen ] wrote:
Israel only lets you put their Hebrew name. I.e., Hebrew and English have to match. The only leeway is that if your name is רבקה, they will let you choose between Rivka and Rebecca, and יעקוב can be Yaakov or Jacob, etc.

But they wont let you do Chaim in Hebrew and Charley in English.


How does Israel know what your Hebrew name is? Don't plenty of secular Israelis have weird modern names in different languages.
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amother




Springgreen
 

Post Tue, Jun 22 2021, 6:48 am
amother [ Aubergine ] wrote:
I usually anglesize the name somewhat. My dh and his siblings grew up with their full hebrew names as legal names and they hated it. Non-jews can't pronounce the name, spell the name etc, so when they go to the dr or anything it's always harder.
It depends on the names as well. My kids names are fairly traditional and easy to switch, think Simon for Shimon, Michael for Michoel etc, but it can be harder when they're more unusual names. You could also do a shortened form of the name, like Eli, which is hard to get wrong.
I don't know if I would do a totally different name though, like Eve instead of Chava.


We do this but for names that don't have an English version we choose to stick to more traditional English names like Bernard, Martin and Herman that the actual zeidas also used.
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shirachadasha




 
 
 
 

Post Tue, Jun 22 2021, 6:58 am
I think it's practical to put the name you call the child on their documents. Secular society is multi-cultural (speakng about the NY area). It's better to have a consistent answer to a basic question like "what's your name?".
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essie14




 
 
 
 

Post Tue, Jun 22 2021, 7:00 am
amother [ Springgreen ] wrote:
How does Israel know what your Hebrew name is? Don't plenty of secular Israelis have weird modern names in different languages.

When your baby is born in Israel you give them the name you want to use. Most israelis don't name their kid Yaakov and call him Jake.
But my son has plenty of secular army buddies with name like
דילון
אסטל
סמי
קבין
ג'יימי
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tigerwife




 
 
 
 

Post Tue, Jun 22 2021, 10:41 am
I put their Hebrew name first but added a secular middle case just in case... in case of what? Not sure. Maybe it’s a leftover Holocaust mentality.
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amother




Skyblue
 

Post Tue, Jun 22 2021, 11:02 am
I put their Hebrew names and still question myself if it was the right thing to do because my son’s name has a “ch” in it.
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Crookshanks




 
 
 
 

Post Tue, Jun 22 2021, 11:28 am
We only have Hebrew names. It makes it easier because there's only one name to fill out on all documents you don't need to remember which name you need to use.
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sillymommy




 
 
 
 

Post Tue, Jun 22 2021, 12:15 pm
My legal name is an english name and I hate it. Its makes things way too complicated. When I got married I tried to deposit checks made out to my hebrew name with my married last name. Problem was my bank account was in my legal first name and maiden last name. I had a hard time convincing the banks I was the same person.

My kids only have on the birth certificates the names they are called by. Much simpler.
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essie14




 
 
 
 

Post Tue, Jun 22 2021, 12:25 pm
sillymommy wrote:
My legal name is an english name and I hate it. Its makes things way too complicated. When I got married I tried to deposit checks made out to my hebrew name with my married last name. Problem was my bank account was in my legal first name and maiden last name. I had a hard time convincing the banks I was the same person.

My kids only have on the birth certificates the names they are called by. Much simpler.

My step kids also have such a hard time depositing checks because their legal names are not similar to the (Hebrew) names they are called.
We kept my DD's name the same on everything.
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#BestBubby




 
 
 
 

Post Tue, Jun 22 2021, 12:26 pm
amother [ Aubergine ] wrote:
I usually anglesize the name somewhat. My dh and his siblings grew up with their full hebrew names as legal names and they hated it. Non-jews can't pronounce the name, spell the name etc, so when they go to the dr or anything it's always harder.
It depends on the names as well. My kids names are fairly traditional and easy to switch, think Simon for Shimon, Michael for Michoel etc, but it can be harder when they're more unusual names. You could also do a shortened form of the name, like Eli, which is hard to get wrong.
I don't know if I would do a totally different name though, like Eve instead of Chava.


Same. I gave kids the English equivalent of their names like Abraham for Avrohom.
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amother




Lightgreen
 

Post Tue, Jun 22 2021, 1:15 pm
amother [ Springgreen ] wrote:
How does Israel know what your Hebrew name is? Don't plenty of secular Israelis have weird modern names in different languages.


You can name your kid Chaim in beit knesset and write Charley צ'ארלי on the Israeli birth certificate, and then you could also have Charley on the US birth certificate/passport. But if Chaim is on the Israeli birth certificate, they won't let you use Charley when you register the birth with the US consulate.
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amother




Lightgreen
 

Post Tue, Jun 22 2021, 1:18 pm
Teomima wrote:
Though if your child has dual citizenship, they can have different names on their passports, as long as their tickets have both names. Dh had this issue for years before he formally changed his English name to his Hebrew name. At one point his ticket had to have six different names (including middle names)!


Was your husband born in the US? I dont know whether the Israelis will let you get a passport with a Hebrew name that doesnt match your US passport. Maybe (or maybe they used to). But today if the kid is born in Israel and gets a Hebrew birth certificate first, the US Embassy wont let you get a passport with an English name that doesnt match the Hebrew name.
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Reality




 
 
 
 

Post Tue, Jun 22 2021, 1:25 pm
Both my husband and I have our hebrew names on our birth certificates and we did the same for our children.
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