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keym




 
 
 
 

Post Thu, Jul 08 2021, 8:46 am
I technically use chicken breast to mean the white meat with the bone. Without the bone is a cutlet.
But turkey breast is common- it's the sliced, deli, cold cut stuff.
A thigh is the triangular piece, a pulka or drumstick for the leg. Both pieces attached is sold as a "leg quarter". Or I guess bottom in some communities.
Those of you making fun, what would you call the cut of chicken that has the thigh and drumstick attached. It's not a thigh, it's more than a thigh.
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LovesHashem




 
 
 
 

Post Thu, Jul 08 2021, 9:14 am
Elfrida wrote:
They might be labelled by their proper name, but everyone I know calls it a משולש (triangle).


I don't have that close interaction with israelis I guess because I've never heard of anyone calling it that either.
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amother




OP
 

Post Thu, Jul 08 2021, 9:25 am
etky wrote:
Does no one actually use 'pulkeh' anymore for drumstick?
That's what we grew up (not Brooklyn, but nearby) calling them.
The thigh was always a thigh though for us.
Here in Israel most adults that I know call the thigh by the proper name 'ירך עוף' but kids call it the 'משולש" and parents will often refer to it that way for the kids' sake. I think kids in general prefer less 'graphic' names for chicken parts.
Growing up, cutlets from the breast meat were always schnitzel in our house. Cutlets was considered a very 'genteel' WASPy term Wink
Breast meat on the bone was just 'the white meat' as opposed to 'the dark meat' which was how the full chicken leg quarter was referred to.
Tops and bottoms were not terms that we used or even heard around us.


We call the drumstick alone a tzum and the white on the bone beilig.
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Amarante




 
 
 
 

Post Thu, Jul 08 2021, 9:57 am
etky wrote:
Does no one actually use 'pulkeh' anymore for drumstick?
That's what we grew up (not Brooklyn, but nearby) calling them.
The thigh was always a thigh though for us.


Yes pulkeh was what it was called when I was growing up in Brooklyn by my family - that was a large piece of meat relatively speaking as it included the whole "leg" of the chicken. I think it was because my family didn't speak Yiddish in the home (except when they wanted to talk about topics they didn't want the kinderlins to understand Very Happy) but they used Yiddish for things relating to the body and foods.

People didn't seem to cook with such separate chicken parts probably because we bought at a relatively small butcher shop and it just wasn't sold that way.

One confusing word was pupik which my Bubbe used to describe a part of the chicken innards as well as a belly button - she was fond of describing mini skirts as being up to the pupik.

I never heard the term bottom until I joined imamother. When I first read it I thought it was describing the literal bottom of a roast chicken which is generally just bones and fat and I thought it was an odd chicken part to be cooking and eating.

We can thank the Victorians for euphemisms of dark and white meat because they didn't want to mention breasts or legs in polite society at the dinner table. I also read that they didn't talk about legs on furniture such as pianos.
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amother




Grape
 

Post Thu, Jul 08 2021, 10:26 am
amother [ OP ] wrote:
We call the drumstick alone a tzum and the white on the bone beilig.


What does beilig mean in English?
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shabbatiscoming




 
 
 
 

Post Fri, Jul 09 2021, 8:43 am
etky wrote:
Ah, but you're not from Brooklyn, are you? Wink
My mother grew up in boropark Wink
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FranticFrummie




 
 
 
 

Post Fri, Jul 09 2021, 8:48 am
keym wrote:
what would you call the cut of chicken that has the thigh and drumstick attached. It's not a thigh, it's more than a thigh.


When both parts are attached, it's a "leg". When the thigh is separate it's a "thigh", and when the lower leg is separate, it's a "drumstick".

"Bottom" always makes me think of what a chicken sits on, where the cloaca is. Ewwww!
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amother




OP
 

Post Fri, Jul 09 2021, 8:48 am
amother [ Grape ] wrote:
What does beilig mean in English?


It means the white part on the bone.
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mizle10




 
 
 
 

Post Fri, Jul 09 2021, 9:08 am
I’m not from Brooklyn, not even the US and my butcher labels it “chicken bottoms”
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thunderstorm




 
 
 
 

Post Fri, Jul 09 2021, 9:31 am
keym wrote:
I technically use chicken breast to mean the white meat with the bone. Without the bone is a cutlet.
But turkey breast is common- it's the sliced, deli, cold cut stuff.
A thigh is the triangular piece, a pulka or drumstick for the leg. Both pieces attached is sold as a "leg quarter". Or I guess bottom in some communities.
Those of you making fun, what would you call the cut of chicken that has the thigh and drumstick attached. It's not a thigh, it's more than a thigh.

It’s called a chicken leg.
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