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What did you break the fast on?
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amother




Ruby
 

Post Mon, Jul 19 2021, 10:34 am
My family is not what most people would call chassidish based on levush, but we are Heimish (keep chassidish minhagim) and we serve fleishig motzai Yom Kippur, for those who are up to it. It’s the holiest time of the year, we are newly forgiven for all our sins, there was never a more appropriate time for a real seudah.
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imanotmommy




 
 
 
 

Post Mon, Jul 19 2021, 10:40 am
Soda just to get the energy to eat
French toast with ice cream
Pizza with fries
Onion soup with cheese

I always have a huge list of foods I want to eat, so I make sure to have only a little bit of each. It adds up to a large meal, but not a whole day's worth of food.
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SYA




 
 
 
 

Post Mon, Jul 19 2021, 10:46 am
Baked fish
Soup
Baked ziti
Salad

And freshly baked cakes.

Orange juice and vitamin water
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LiLIsraeli




 
 
 
 

Post Mon, Jul 19 2021, 10:53 am
First - cinnamon rugalach and coffee.

About an hour later, toast, omelettes, home fries.
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Reality




 
 
 
 

Post Mon, Jul 19 2021, 10:57 am
amother [ Ruby ] wrote:
My family is not what most people would call chassidish based on levush, but we are Heimish (keep chassidish minhagim) and we serve fleishig motzai Yom Kippur, for those who are up to it. It’s the holiest time of the year, we are newly forgiven for all our sins, there was never a more appropriate time for a real seudah.


Eating a fleishig seuda after Yom Kippur is the traditional European minhag. It has nothing to do with being chassidishe. My background is Lithuanian and my grandparents did this. My parents stopped it because my father couldn't stomach eating fleishigs after a fast.

When I got married I found out my husband's family had the same minhag, not chassidishe from Belgium/Germany. So I continued it.

Honestly, eating a bowl of hot chicken soup is wonderful after a fast! And I don't think eating chicken is harder to digest than cheese after a fast. I think the key is plain food and not too much of it!
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BrisketBoss




 
 
 
 

Post Mon, Jul 19 2021, 10:58 am
liveandlove.ima wrote:
while I don't know the science behind it but when you break a fast you must first drink since your body needs liquid more than anything else, that feeling is of a dryness. so if you drink at least 1 cup of water this should not happen. Your welcome!


So as someone mentioned, that doesn't help. It isn't dehydration exactly. It doesn't seem to be much studied but the theories I saw last night had to do with dormant glands in roof of the mouth or dormant salivation, and the sudden reactivation of these is a lot of stimulation that the body can interpret as pain...anyway, interesting stuff. Some people wrote that they feel worse if the first thing they eat is sugar or carb heavy, but whatever they start with they'll still get it.
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watergirl




 
 
 
 

Post Mon, Jul 19 2021, 11:07 am
amother [ Begonia ] wrote:
I think this may be cultural. A siyum isn't something that occurs here once a year. There are different mesechtas that take difference amounts of time.. A bocher can be mesayem a mesechta every few months. My brother for example, learns every mesechta 7 times so the fifth time he learns it, it is faster and easier than the first. For yingerlait in Kollel, they are also mesayem mesechtas a few times a year depending on which. Even a working man who puts aside learning a few hours a day can be mesayem in a few months or half a year depending on how long or hard the mesechta is. We have siyums here not just in the 9 days. Also, a bochur can often be holding in the middle of a mesechta which he can be mesayem at any time or in a few days.

Also, making a siyum in the nine days is something that our rebbes really encouraged and our parents and grandparents were raised with. It is a huge inyan and brought down in chassides. For example, the Sanzer Ruv zy"u was makpid to have everyday a a siyum in the 9 days. The Satmar Ruv zy"u also tried to have everyday and even to give the boys in camp fleishigs. In the town of Siget they were makpid on motsi tisha bav and other days if other siyums happened. My father's dayan ztz"l also tried tried make a siyum every day in the nine days. These are big tzadikim who learned more than we can understand but the yesodos from making a siyum were given over to their chassidim and talmidi. Other chassidises were makpid only the first 5 days, etc. but it was considered a very big inyan.

It is brought down in a halucha sefer commenting on the shulchan urech that the heiliger Rizhiner once went away for tisha bav. On motsi he asked if anyone in the Town was making a siyum. He was told that not, so he sat down with his Talmidim and was mesayem a mesechta mishnayos (not even gemura) and then made a siyum motsi tisha bav.

I'm not a learned person and I don't understand lashon hakodesh, but I know this information because when my father makes a siyum during the 9 days and on motsi tisha bav he talks about the inyan, about learning Torah during our darkest times, about our heilige minhugim. It's not like a siyum is used as an "excuse to eat felishigs." No, just the opposite. It is a huge inyan and we are having the haspuas from it. We're not on the level to have a siyum everyday like our rebbes but we do when we can and also other times throughout the year.

That being said, other people have their own rabonim and minhugim and should follow that but it doesn't mean something is wrong with mine chv.

I hear you.
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imorethanamother




 
 
 
 

Post Mon, Jul 19 2021, 11:16 am
I don’t understand why everyone has coffee?! Are you people completely immune to caffeine?? I’d be up for hours and hours.
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amother




Garnet
 

Post Mon, Jul 19 2021, 11:21 am
I do know lots of litvish people who have a fleishig meal after YK, ( but not because they are making a siyum. Its the idea of it being a celebratory seudah.)

However this is the first I heard of making a siyum/eating fleishigs after Tisha Bav, so it is very interesting to learn about this minhag.
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amother




Begonia
 

Post Mon, Jul 19 2021, 11:25 am
amother [ Garnet ] wrote:
I do know lots of litvish people who have a fleishig meal after YK, ( but not because they are making a siyum. Its the idea of it being a celebratory seudah.)

However this is the first I heard of making a siyum/eating fleishigs after Tisha Bav, so it is very interesting to learn about this minhag.


The seuda motsi yom Kippur has nothing to do with a siyum. I brought it up because I thought the amother was asking how someone could have a seuda after fasting so I said we do that motsi yom kippur. I hadn't realized others weren't aware of a siyum motsi tisha bav, some of the reasons for which I explained in the previous post.
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paperflowers




 
 
 
 

Post Mon, Jul 19 2021, 11:25 am
amother [ Begonia ] wrote:
Coffee and bean soup.
My parents have a minhag to make a siyum motsi tisha bav, so they fast ois with juice and kokosh cake and then have a regular fleishige seuda with fish, soup and fleish.


Wish that was our minhag. We had this brilliant idea that dh and I would break our fast on the rest of the chicken soup from Shabbos and only realized the issue with that during havdala Can't Believe It
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out-of-towner




 
 
 
 

Post Mon, Jul 19 2021, 11:26 am
Vitamin Water, Lemonade, cinnamon buns (homemade, made during the fast), broccoli soup, tuna, avocado, and potato chips.
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icedcoffee




 
 
 
 

Post Mon, Jul 19 2021, 11:43 am
Some coffee cake and lots of water. Can I ask about the cinnamon buns? had at least two people IRL tell me yesterday they were baking cinnamon buns and now I see it on the thread here too. Is it a tradition?
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amother




Begonia
 

Post Mon, Jul 19 2021, 11:48 am
watergirl wrote:
Thanks for clarifying re: your type-o. I am also chassidish but I do not know anyone who has a fleishing seuda after Yom Kippur Smile

We must remember that the things we do during the 9 days are NOT halacha, and if someone has a health need, it MUST be seen to. That is the mitzvah. One who needs to eat meat for the iron or whatever is doing a mitzvah when they eat the meat. It is the opposite of a mitzvah to neglect your health. My husband loves to tell the story of Reb Zusha and Reb Elimelech who danced while in jail when Reb Zusha reminded Reb Elimelech, (who was crying because there was a chamber pot in the cell and therefor they could not daven) that by not davening at that moment, they are doing Hashem's will and therefor they were doing a mitzvah (See here for the whole story).

I've never gone to a siyum during the 9 days and it looks like for the next many years I will be, because last year my best friend lost her son and his yartzeit is during the 9 days. Our Breslov minhag is to make a siyum for the yartzeit and therefor a fleishig seuda. This year was the first time and I have to tell you, the meatballs were very hard to swallow. They were delicious, but very painful.

I want to be clear - I have zero objection to making a siyum during the 9 days. I do feel that it's almost to the point of silliness to plan out the learning schedule so conveniently as to have more than one. As I said before, if one has a need to eat meat, he or she should do so and know they are doing Hashem's will.


I also forgot to mention that yes, not eating fleishigs in the 9 days in halacha, not minhag. I think motsi tisha bav it is minhag which is why it is lachter but I'm not sure. Still, obviously someone with a health need can still get a heter.

That being said, it's hard for older erliche yidden, even with a heter, to just go ahead and have chicken cutlets because their doctor and dayan said they must. They may be able to tell someone else in the same position to, but it's hard for them to accept, especially milchuma iberlebers who will sacrifice so much.

So when you have a grandparent like this and he needs to eat fleishigs in the 9 days, it's best to do it in a way that doesn't make them feel like they are being matir. BH the children and grandchildren can make siyums and since many of these grandparents were raised with the generation of rebbes of tried to make siyums everyday and they are serious and erlich they appreciate the siyum and its probably better for their health than the fleishigs.

We still make siyums for other reasons listed previously and BH none of my grandparents must eat fleishigs but I have heard people talk about doing this.
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BrisketBoss




 
 
 
 

Post Mon, Jul 19 2021, 11:50 am
icedcoffee wrote:
Some coffee cake and lots of water. Can I ask about the cinnamon buns? had at least two people IRL tell me yesterday they were baking cinnamon buns and now I see it on the thread here too. Is it a tradition?


I've seen it a lot in an FB cooking group. So I would say that it's become a thing, not sure how far it dates back.
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Reality




 
 
 
 

Post Mon, Jul 19 2021, 11:58 am
icedcoffee wrote:
Some coffee cake and lots of water. Can I ask about the cinnamon buns? had at least two people IRL tell me yesterday they were baking cinnamon buns and now I see it on the thread here too. Is it a tradition?


My MIL always made a very complicated mini cinnamon bun pull apart cake. I'm pretty sure her mother did too. I think it is traditional in the sense that it was very time consuming to make so it filled up the afternoon after kinnos.

In my family we cleaned to get ready for mashiach. I thought it was interesting in another thread when someone said it was an Israeli/Yerushalmi minhag because my family is neither.

Later in life, we learned it's a mingag taus/incorrect minhag. I'm sure the baking is too!!
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out-of-towner




 
 
 
 

Post Mon, Jul 19 2021, 12:15 pm
icedcoffee wrote:
Some coffee cake and lots of water. Can I ask about the cinnamon buns? had at least two people IRL tell me yesterday they were baking cinnamon buns and now I see it on the thread here too. Is it a tradition?


I was bored. I like to bake. I like to have something baked for after the fast. So I made cinnamon buns. I had never done it before, it was a pain in the neck, I don't think I will do it again so fast.

Nothing to do with tradition any more than having bagels and lox to break the fast is "tradition" (for Motzei Yom Kippur we do Fleishing as it is considered a YT Seuda).
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tigerwife




 
 
 
 

Post Mon, Jul 19 2021, 12:17 pm
BrisketBoss wrote:
So as someone mentioned, that doesn't help. It isn't dehydration exactly. It doesn't seem to be much studied but the theories I saw last night had to do with dormant glands in roof of the mouth or dormant salivation, and the sudden reactivation of these is a lot of stimulation that the body can interpret as pain...anyway, interesting stuff. Some people wrote that they feel worse if the first thing they eat is sugar or carb heavy, but whatever they start with they'll still get it.


I have this when I drink Orange juice after a fast. It’s like my palette stiffens up, becomes almost hard and bumpy. I actually didn’t feel it this year as I made sure to start off with lots of water.
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amother




Begonia
 

Post Mon, Jul 19 2021, 2:01 pm
amother [ Garnet ] wrote:

However this is the first I heard of making a siyum/eating fleishigs after Tisha Bav, so it is very interesting to learn about this minhag.


For those who want to follow this part of the thread without derailing this thread, I have copied and pasted information to page 4 of a a thread I think it applies to where I am amother natural.

https://www.imamother.com/foru.....rt=60
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realsilver




 
 
 
 

Post Mon, Jul 19 2021, 8:36 pm
watergirl wrote:
Thanks for clarifying re: your type-o. I am also chassidish but I do not know anyone who has a fleishing seuda after Yom Kippur Smile

We must remember that the things we do during the 9 days are NOT halacha, and if someone has a health need, it MUST be seen to. That is the mitzvah. One who needs to eat meat for the iron or whatever is doing a mitzvah when they eat the meat. It is the opposite of a mitzvah to neglect your health. My husband loves to tell the story of Reb Zusha and Reb Elimelech who danced while in jail when Reb Zusha reminded Reb Elimelech, (who was crying because there was a chamber pot in the cell and therefor they could not daven) that by not davening at that moment, they are doing Hashem's will and therefor they were doing a mitzvah (See here for the whole story).

I've never gone to a siyum during the 9 days and it looks like for the next many years I will be, because last year my best friend lost her son and his yartzeit is during the 9 days. Our Breslov minhag is to make a siyum for the yartzeit and therefor a fleishig seuda. This year was the first time and I have to tell you, the meatballs were very hard to swallow. They were delicious, but very painful.

I want to be clear - I have zero objection to making a siyum during the 9 days. I do feel that it's almost to the point of silliness to plan out the learning schedule so conveniently as to have more than one. As I said before, if one has a need to eat meat, he or she should do so and know they are doing Hashem's will.



This is beautiful and all but you should know that rebbes do have a particular minhag to make siyumim in the 9 days.
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