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Is cottage cheese healthy

 
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amother




OP
 

Post Thu, Oct 14 2021, 1:47 pm
If I eat cottage cheese and banana for lunch can I tell myself wow you ate such a wonderful nutrious healthy lunch and its really great for your diet and will help you lose that mama pooch you still have with a 1year old baby LOL LOL
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amother




Seagreen
 

Post Thu, Oct 14 2021, 1:54 pm
Depends on the fat and sodium content of the cottage cheese.
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#BestBubby




 
 
 
 

Post Thu, Oct 14 2021, 2:11 pm
Sounds healthy to me.

Cottage Cheese is a good source of protein.

Bananas are considered high in (natural) sugar. Cantelope is lower in sugar.
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zaq




 
 
 
 

Post Thu, Oct 14 2021, 2:15 pm
It’s an excellent inexpensive source of protein. Not as rich in calcium as you’d think but still provides some. You’re better off with low-fat than creamed style, but some low-fat brands are full of additives like modified food starch that aren’t the best. Read and compare labels and choose the variety that makes the most sense to you.

Cottage cheese and a banana make a good start, but add some veggies and a complex carb like whole-grain toast to round out the meal.
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amother




Jasmine
 

Post Thu, Oct 14 2021, 2:25 pm
Cottage cheese can only be as healthy as the cow it came from, the food the cow got fed, and how it was processed so if it’s regular commercial cottage cheese I don’t consider it healthy. But I low carb is your goal I’d give it a pass.
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amother




Wandflower
 

Post Wed, Jan 19 2022, 5:35 pm
amother [ Jasmine ] wrote:
Cottage cheese can only be as healthy as the cow it came from, the food the cow got fed, and how it was processed so if it’s regular commercial cottage cheese I don’t consider it healthy. But I low carb is your goal I’d give it a pass.


what is the commercial and non commercial way of processing cottage cheese?
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amother




Wandflower
 

Post Wed, Jan 19 2022, 5:36 pm
I just bought full fat cottage cheese. the ing says skimmed milk and milk cream, so the milk is skimmed and then cream added to make it full fat. why can't you just make it from whole milk?
is there no way to use full fat milk to make cottage cheese?
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#BestBubby




 
 
 
 

Post Wed, Jan 19 2022, 8:11 pm
How to Make Cottage Cheese From Scratch: Step-By-Step https://sevensons.net/blog/how.....heese

The science is simple: You heat milk on a stove and the natural bacteria make enough acid for the cheese to curdle. If you want to accelerate the process, you can use vinegar (acid) to curdle it faster. These curds are cooked, cut, then washed. Whey, which is naturally produced by cheese making, is naturally sour so when you wash the cheese it makes it sweet.

As you can see, making your own homemade cottage cheese is a straightforward process that requires little effort, but produces very satisfying results. Here's our recipe for the perfect homemade cottage cheese.

Step 1: Heat the Milk

Pour one gallon of milk of your choice into a large and heavy pot. Heat up the pot to about 190 degrees Fahrenheit. Use either a wooden spoon or a whisk to gently stir from time to time so the milk on the bottom of the pot doesn't burn. If it does start to burn, take it quickly off the burner and let it cool off a bit. Replace the milk if necessary.

Step 2: Remove from Heat

Once the milk has been heated to temperature, remove the pot from the heat. If you remove it prematurely, your cheese may not curdle. If you do not remove it in time, you will get very small curds, a low yield, and your cheese will be tough and chewy.

Step 3: Mix in Acid, then Rest

Pour in the 3/4 cup of vinegar or lemon juice and stir using the wooden spoon or whisk. You'll start to see the milk curdle at this point. Then, cover the entire pot and let it rest for thirty minutes.

Step 4: Prepare the Colander

In the meantime, use the cheese cloth or tea towel to line a colander. Place the colander over one of the extra bowls so that when you place the cheese in it to drain, the extra bowl catches anything that'll drip out.

Step 5: Remove Solids and Drain

Use the slotted spoon to move the cottage cheese solids from the pot into the lined colander. Then, let it drain into the bowl for thirty minutes or until the dripping has slowed down. If you don't have a slotted spoon, you can use a normal spoon but the draining process may take a bit longer.

Step 6: Wring Out Cheese and Rinse

After the cheese is drained, take everything out of the colander by gathering the ends of the cloth tightly and wrapping the cheese into a ball with it. Hold it in one hand and run cold water over it while squeezing it gently with your other hand. Running it under cold water will ensure that the ball of cheese cools down adequately.

Step 7: Break Up Curds and Salt

When the cheese is cooled down, dump it out into the extra bowl not holding the liquid whey. Use the whisk or wooden spoon to break the cheese into smaller curds (or you can keep the larger curds if you prefer!). Then, stir in the teaspoon of salt to taste.

Step 8 (Optional): Add Heavy Cream

Optional: If you want creamy homemade cottage cheese, this is the time to use the heavy cream. Stir it in two tablespoons at a time until the cottage cheese reaches the consistency you prefer. Check the taste of your cottage cheese from time to time, and add more salt to taste if you prefer.

Step 9: Chill and Serve

Chill your cottage cheese for at least an hour before serving. Make sure to use it within 5-7 days, sooner if you use milk that's about to spoil.

Note: Make sure not to dispose of the drippings from the cheese that is in your first extra bowl; this is whey. You may know of whey from being sold to fitness gurus and bodybuilders. It's also the yellowish liquid that pools on store-bought cottage cheese or yogurt. Whey is packed with protein! You can save the whey drippings in your fridge or freeze it to use in soups and smoothies.

How to Store Cottage Cheese
Like sour cream or cream cheese, cottage cheese has a short shelf life after it is made (about seven to ten days). It may seem obvious to store it in the refrigerator to prolong its shelf life.

However, some who go solely by this rule find that it goes sour very quickly. This is because there is a very specific way to store cottage cheese so that it doesn't go bad as fast. It may surprise you, but the best way to store it is upside down in the refrigerator.

When you store the package of cottage cheese upside down in the fridge, it creates a vacuum at the bottom (new "top") of the container. This reduces any excessive growth of bacteria within the container and prolongs its shelf life.

Always make sure to have a tight lid on the container and replace it carefully so no cottage cheese falls out – the last thing you want is to have fresh, wet cottage cheese all over your kitchen floor!

First off, you'll need a container with a tight-fitting lid such as a Tupperware or mason jar. You'll need to put the cottage cheese in the container carefully and slowly, then close the lid tightly. After you're sure the lid is on correctly, invert the container and store on a shelf in your fridge.
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amother




Wandflower
 

Post Wed, Jan 19 2022, 8:16 pm
#BestBubby wrote:
How to Make Cottage Cheese From Scratch: Step-By-Step https://sevensons.net/blog/how.....heese

The science is simple: You heat milk on a stove and the natural bacteria make enough acid for the cheese to curdle. If you want to accelerate the process, you can use vinegar (acid) to curdle it faster. These curds are cooked, cut, then washed. Whey, which is naturally produced by cheese making, is naturally sour so when you wash the cheese it makes it sweet.

As you can see, making your own homemade cottage cheese is a straightforward process that requires little effort, but produces very satisfying results. Here's our recipe for the perfect homemade cottage cheese.

Step 1: Heat the Milk

Pour one gallon of milk of your choice into a large and heavy pot. Heat up the pot to about 190 degrees Fahrenheit. Use either a wooden spoon or a whisk to gently stir from time to time so the milk on the bottom of the pot doesn't burn. If it does start to burn, take it quickly off the burner and let it cool off a bit. Replace the milk if necessary.

Step 2: Remove from Heat

Once the milk has been heated to temperature, remove the pot from the heat. If you remove it prematurely, your cheese may not curdle. If you do not remove it in time, you will get very small curds, a low yield, and your cheese will be tough and chewy.

Step 3: Mix in Acid, then Rest

Pour in the 3/4 cup of vinegar or lemon juice and stir using the wooden spoon or whisk. You'll start to see the milk curdle at this point. Then, cover the entire pot and let it rest for thirty minutes.

Step 4: Prepare the Colander

In the meantime, use the cheese cloth or tea towel to line a colander. Place the colander over one of the extra bowls so that when you place the cheese in it to drain, the extra bowl catches anything that'll drip out.

Step 5: Remove Solids and Drain

Use the slotted spoon to move the cottage cheese solids from the pot into the lined colander. Then, let it drain into the bowl for thirty minutes or until the dripping has slowed down. If you don't have a slotted spoon, you can use a normal spoon but the draining process may take a bit longer.

Step 6: Wring Out Cheese and Rinse

After the cheese is drained, take everything out of the colander by gathering the ends of the cloth tightly and wrapping the cheese into a ball with it. Hold it in one hand and run cold water over it while squeezing it gently with your other hand. Running it under cold water will ensure that the ball of cheese cools down adequately.

Step 7: Break Up Curds and Salt

When the cheese is cooled down, dump it out into the extra bowl not holding the liquid whey. Use the whisk or wooden spoon to break the cheese into smaller curds (or you can keep the larger curds if you prefer!). Then, stir in the teaspoon of salt to taste.

Step 8 (Optional): Add Heavy Cream

Optional: If you want creamy homemade cottage cheese, this is the time to use the heavy cream. Stir it in two tablespoons at a time until the cottage cheese reaches the consistency you prefer. Check the taste of your cottage cheese from time to time, and add more salt to taste if you prefer.

Step 9: Chill and Serve

Chill your cottage cheese for at least an hour before serving. Make sure to use it within 5-7 days, sooner if you use milk that's about to spoil.

Note: Make sure not to dispose of the drippings from the cheese that is in your first extra bowl; this is whey. You may know of whey from being sold to fitness gurus and bodybuilders. It's also the yellowish liquid that pools on store-bought cottage cheese or yogurt. Whey is packed with protein! You can save the whey drippings in your fridge or freeze it to use in soups and smoothies.

How to Store Cottage Cheese
Like sour cream or cream cheese, cottage cheese has a short shelf life after it is made (about seven to ten days). It may seem obvious to store it in the refrigerator to prolong its shelf life.

However, some who go solely by this rule find that it goes sour very quickly. This is because there is a very specific way to store cottage cheese so that it doesn't go bad as fast. It may surprise you, but the best way to store it is upside down in the refrigerator.

When you store the package of cottage cheese upside down in the fridge, it creates a vacuum at the bottom (new "top") of the container. This reduces any excessive growth of bacteria within the container and prolongs its shelf life.

Always make sure to have a tight lid on the container and replace it carefully so no cottage cheese falls out – the last thing you want is to have fresh, wet cottage cheese all over your kitchen floor!

First off, you'll need a container with a tight-fitting lid such as a Tupperware or mason jar. You'll need to put the cottage cheese in the container carefully and slowly, then close the lid tightly. After you're sure the lid is on correctly, invert the container and store on a shelf in your fridge.


thanks for taking the time with these detailed instructions.

just wondering how is commercial cottage cheese diff.
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amother




Jasmine
 

Post Wed, Jan 19 2022, 8:22 pm
amother [ Wandflower ] wrote:
thanks for taking the time with these detailed instructions.

just wondering how is commercial cottage cheese diff.
For starters, the milk comes from unhealthy cows raised in unhealthy conditions fed unhealthy feed. Then pasteurized and homogenized and preservatives added. That’s just the beginning.
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amother




Wandflower
 

Post Wed, Jan 19 2022, 8:24 pm
amother [ Jasmine ] wrote:
For starters, the milk comes from unhealthy cows raised in unhealthy conditions fed unhealthy feed. Then pasteurized and homogenized and preservatives added. That’s just the beginning.


and the milk you use?
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amother




Jasmine
 

Post Wed, Jan 19 2022, 8:25 pm
amother [ Wandflower ] wrote:
and the milk you use?
I don’t use milk. But if I would, I would go with bethel creamery, or meant to be dairy, or goats milk.
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