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Putting to sleep on stomach
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amother




Diamond
 

Post Mon, Nov 22 2021, 3:10 am
amother [ Dimgray ] wrote:
My kids all slept comfortably on their stomachs - until the one, who died of SIDS!!! Crying

Just because most kids do OK on their stomachs (as did my older children), doesn’t mean they all will (as evidenced by my child, who did not wake up one morning.) PSA: Most children will do OK on their stomachs, but how do you know if your child is one, who won’t? (My child had no warning signs, and my pediatrician had given me a green light to put him on his stomach.).

It’s true it’s a relatively small risk - but, given that the potential consequences are devastating and irreversible- is it worth taking the chance???


Im so sorry, You should find nachama.

I hate to question you about your loss but I think it could be very helpful for other mothers and babies.
Do you think stomache sleeping was the reason or could it have been something else?
If it's the former than perhaps I need to rethink the way my babies sleep.
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amother




Hunter
 

Post Mon, Nov 22 2021, 3:31 am
Nobody really knows the risks of a baby not getting adequate sleep. If you track the sleep quality and check for correlations with later illness, it might turn out safer to put the baby on the stomach.
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Zehava




 
 
 
 

Post Mon, Nov 22 2021, 7:55 am
amother [ Hunter ] wrote:
Nobody really knows the risks of a baby not getting adequate sleep. If you track the sleep quality and check for correlations with later illness, it might turn out safer to put the baby on the stomach.

In addition to that, back-sleeping has caused a dramatic rise in flat-head syndrome and developmental delay. On a percentage that is a lot great than the total percentage of babies who die of SIDs.
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amother




Firebrick
 

Post Mon, Nov 22 2021, 4:47 pm
As long as their bodies aren't constricted by swaddles or sleep sacks, so they can roll over if necessary, stomach sleeping once baby can roll from stomach to back isn't inherently more dangerous than back sleeping.
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s1




 
 
 
 

Post Mon, Nov 22 2021, 6:12 pm
However, the research is pretty clear about the concrete connection between these recommendations and a reduced risk of SIDS, which peaksTrusted Source between 2 and 4 months of age.

The AAP first communicated sleep recommendations in 1992, and the “Back to Sleep” campaign began in 1994, now known as the “Safe to SleepTrusted Source” movement.

Since the early 1990s, deaths from SIDS decreasedTrusted Source from 130.3 deaths per 100,000 live births in 1990 to 35.2 deaths per 100,000 live births in 2018.

Why exactly is belly sleeping a problem, if some babies seem to love it so much? It increases the risk of SIDS, but researchersTrusted Source aren’t entirely sure why.

Some studies suggest upper airway problems like obstruction, which can happen when a baby breathes their own exhaled breath back in. This causes carbon dioxide to build and oxygen to drop.

Breathing in your own exhaled breath can also make it harder for body heat to escape, which causes overheating. (Overheating is a known risk factor of SIDS, though sweating is not.)

The irony is a belly-sleeping baby enters longer periods of deeper sleep, and may be less reactive to noise, which is exactly what every parent dreams of.

However the exact goal parents are reaching for is also what makes it dangerous. Belly sleepers also have sudden decreases in blood pressure and heart rate control.

Basically, it’s kind of safe that a baby comes into lighter sleep frequently and doesn’t seem to go into that uninterrupted sleep cycle we want for them (and for their tired parents).

Quote from Healthline website.

Surely the risk of flat head and slight developmental delay is less important than the risk of death chv
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Rubies




 
 
 
 

Post Mon, Nov 22 2021, 7:49 pm
I always thought it's to prevent suffocation if baby doesn't have the muscle strength to lift their head up.
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amother




Hunter
 

Post Mon, Nov 22 2021, 8:01 pm
s1 wrote:
Surely the risk of flat head and slight developmental delay is less important than the risk of death chv

What about the risk of permanent disability that leads to later depression and ch"v suicide?
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Zehava




 
 
 
 

Post Mon, Nov 22 2021, 8:11 pm
What these 20 year old studies fail to mention that at the same time that back to sleep was introduced SIDS was already declining from before. Also, awareness increased of many other risk factors such as smoking. In addition to that, fetal mortality from other causes went up, which suggests that diagnostic criteria changed at that time. So deaths that would’ve been classified as SIDS were now classified as other things, such as suffocation.
Correlation is not causation my friends. They are still out there guessing.
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Zehava




 
 
 
 

Post Mon, Nov 22 2021, 8:13 pm
I don’t trust the AAP much TbH. They are not current with their recommendations in general. Someone here a while back used them as evidence to put babies in timeout.
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amother




OP
 

Post Mon, Nov 22 2021, 8:13 pm
Rubies wrote:
I always thought it's to prevent suffocation if baby doesn't have the muscle strength to lift their head up.


me too. I'm more confused now..
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Zehava




 
 
 
 

Post Mon, Nov 22 2021, 8:15 pm
amother [ OP ] wrote:
me too. I'm more confused now..

They don’t know more than you do. They’re experimenting on generations of children. And doesn’t it speak for itself that after 20 years they don’t know more than when they began.
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amother




OP
 

Post Mon, Nov 22 2021, 8:16 pm
Zehava wrote:
They don’t know more than you do. They’re experimenting on generations of children. And doesn’t it speak for itself that after 20 years they don’t know more than when they began.


good point.. and I agree that there are too many other factors to consider..
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amother




Hibiscus
 

Post Tue, Nov 23 2021, 6:23 pm
If you plan on sending to a legal daycare. PLEASE put your baby to sleep on their back without a blanket. It will make the transition so much easier.
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