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Making aliyah iyH - questions, please help!
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Reality




 
 
 
 

Post Thu, Dec 02 2021, 5:23 pm
What is a mirpeset sheirut?
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Teomima




 
 
 
 

Post Thu, Dec 02 2021, 5:27 pm
Reality wrote:
What is a mirpeset sheirut?

Many apartments have small utility rooms, usually off the bathroom or kitchen, most often used as a laundry room. Usually with a larger window to access laundry lines so it's considered an enclosed utility mirpeset vs a real room.
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amother




OP
 

Post Thu, Dec 02 2021, 5:29 pm
Bnei Berak 10 wrote:
*The* major problem I say. Even a couple without kids will have a hard time. Pesach equipment. Succot decorations and schach. Suitcases. Fans for summer and heating devices in the winter.


Exactly....where do sukkahs and decorations, bikes, skates, scooters, and outdoor toys and equipment, etc go in apartments with no outdoor storage area?
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Reality




 
 
 
 

Post Thu, Dec 02 2021, 5:31 pm
Teomima wrote:
Many apartments have small utility rooms, usually off the bathroom or kitchen, most often used as a laundry room. Usually with a larger window to access laundry lines so it's considered an enclosed utility mirpeset vs a real room.


Got it. I just call that my laundry room. Now I know the hebrew word for it. Thanks!
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Reality




 
 
 
 

Post Thu, Dec 02 2021, 5:35 pm
amother [ OP ] wrote:
Exactly....where do sukkahs and decorations, bikes, skates, scooters, and outdoor toys and equipment, etc go in apartments with no outdoor storage area?


I have a small mirpeset and a small enclosed garden. I'm planning on storing my succah in the garden covered with a tarp. The bikes as well under my neighbors porch so semi protected. My son's scooter currently lives in my apartment. He even has a parking spot for it. I told him when our stuff comes he's not going to be able to scoot around in doors anymore!

What other outdoor toys are you talking about? I sold or gave away everything else.
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Teomima




 
 
 
 

Post Thu, Dec 02 2021, 5:41 pm
amother [ OP ] wrote:
Exactly....where do sukkahs and decorations, bikes, skates, scooters, and outdoor toys and equipment, etc go in apartments with no outdoor storage area?

For starters, you just don't have as much. Depending on where you live, some of those things might not be practical to keep. Skates, for example. Much of the terrain here isn't really skate friendly, so unless you go to a skate park regularly, they may not be worth keeping. And obviously no use for ice skates here.

Some buildings have outdoor bike racks, or space in the stairwell where people chain bikes. Scooters and bimbas we keep on the mirpeset.

For other things, you find space. We have an Israeli style Sukkah with metal poles for the frame. We keep the poles in the corner in one of our kids' bedrooms, squeezed in between the wall and the closet. The cloths walls and the decorations are in a drawer under one of the beds. Schach for many, many years we bought new cheap schach every year since we had no place to store it. Our neighbors trim their palm trees and give it the fronds for free, that also helped. Now we found space in our stairwell to keep it. Some buildings have miklatim (a bomb shelter) underneath that residents share as storage space (though technically not always legal). And some people have a machsan. That's really hitting the jackpot. That, and underground parking....what more could someone ask for in an Israeli apartment?
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amother




Powderblue
 

Post Thu, Dec 02 2021, 7:20 pm
Teomima wrote:
For starters, you just don't have as much. Depending on where you live, some of those things might not be practical to keep. Skates, for example. Much of the terrain here isn't really skate friendly, so unless you go to a skate park regularly, they may not be worth keeping. And obviously no use for ice skates here.

Some buildings have outdoor bike racks, or space in the stairwell where people chain bikes. Scooters and bimbas we keep on the mirpeset.

For other things, you find space. We have an Israeli style Sukkah with metal poles for the frame. We keep the poles in the corner in one of our kids' bedrooms, squeezed in between the wall and the closet. The cloths walls and the decorations are in a drawer under one of the beds. Schach for many, many years we bought new cheap schach every year since we had no place to store it. Our neighbors trim their palm trees and give it the fronds for free, that also helped. Now we found space in our stairwell to keep it. Some buildings have miklatim (a bomb shelter) underneath that residents share as storage space (though technically not always legal). And some people have a machsan. That's really hitting the jackpot. That, and underground parking....what more could someone ask for in an Israeli apartment?

Our sukkah is metal poles, they live in the miklat. The fabric lives in our laundry room, on the windowsill beside the washer. The schach is rolled up and in a corner of one of the kids' rooms, between two shelves, alongside two rolled-up area rugs.
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LovesHashem




 
 
 
 

Post Fri, Dec 03 2021, 3:45 am
Reality wrote:
It really is freeing. Part of me can't wait for my lift to come so we have a couch again and a normal sized table to eat together on. The other part of me is wondering do I still need all this stuff?

I sold, gave away and threw out a TON of stuff before we moved. We went from a house with a basement to an apartment. My stuff is supposed to come any day now. We'll see how well I did soon enough!

Just for the record we filled a 20 ft lift. Do not take a 40 ft lift for an average Israeli apartment. You will not have space!!


Whatever you find is extra you can sell. People love buying second hand household items. Newlyweds buy, and we still buy from second hand sales, especially children's items as we still dont have a large enough selection for our toddler.
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DVOM




 
 
 
 

Post Fri, Dec 03 2021, 6:45 am
We are not planning on making Aliya, but I'm loving reading this thread. Enjoy every moment of your beautiful move op! I wish you an easy, peaceful transition!
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Iymnok




 
 
 
 

Post Fri, Dec 03 2021, 8:08 am
There is storage under most beds that’s great for out of season paraphernalia.

I have a sewing machine and serger. They are both plugged into a transformer. The sewing machines here are very expensive.
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amother




Bone
 

Post Fri, Dec 03 2021, 8:12 am
1. It really depends on the machsan. I have an exterior machsan and I have a keter closet inside where I keep bathing suits, swim bags, umbrellas and things like that, but I don't keep real clothing since it would smell musty.
If you have your own parking space and it's covered, people install metal beams like a shelf to hold their succah over the parking spot.
Our building has a room for strollers off of the lobby and most people keep their succahs there. Bikes and scooters are also kept there.

2. I second Bondy - they're so helpful!

3. Is there a window off of your laundry room? Most apt's have one and there is a place to hang laundry. It usually has some kind of grate blocking it so people can't see your laundry. We hang our laundry on the mirpeset during nice weather and in a corner of the living room during bad weather. It's a good incentive to fold it quickly!

4. We managed to fit an IKEA closet into the hallway outside the bedrooms and made it into a coat closet.
Tools, art supplies, light bulbs, extension cords are stored in the exterior machsan on shelves or in a kitchen cabinet. In one of my kids' rooms, we have a shelf with plastic drawers of supplies we use more often like markers, pens and scissors.
Linen is stored in the top cabinet of each bedroom. Towels are in a top cabinet in one of my kids' rooms.
Extra toiletries are stored in the bathroom vanity but we don't keep too many. We bought mirrored IKEA cabinets for over the bathroom sinks and medicines and makeup are stored there.

5. We hung hooks in every room behind the door, on the wall that the door swings into. You can't put any furniture there and when the door is open, it blocks the hooks, so it doesn't look so messy. Backpacks are supposed to go under the desk in the one kids bedroom that has room for a desk, but they usually end up next to the front door on the floor.

6. The kids play on the porch and in front of the building and in the park. They are outside all day!

You get very good at measuring every little corner and figuring out what can be stored where.
Shelves can be put up in the laundry room for extra toilet paper and detergent.
Aronot don't usually go up to the ceiling and we fit lots of things in the space on top - extra blankets (in plastic so they don't get dusty), hat boxes etc.

I hope this helps!
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amother




Oatmeal
 

Post Fri, Dec 03 2021, 8:27 am
We have one set of beds that lift up and have the whole base as a storage container. All of our linens and plenty of other things fit in there. It's a little inconvenient if my back is out, but otherwise very useful.
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LovesHashem




 
 
 
 

Post Fri, Dec 03 2021, 8:30 am
amother [ Oatmeal ] wrote:
We have one set of beds that lift up and have the whole base as a storage container. All of our linens and plenty of other things fit in there. It's a little inconvenient if my back is out, but otherwise very useful.


Yes. We keep all linen, extra bedding, towels, blankets, and out of season clothing there.
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amother




Diamond
 

Post Fri, Dec 03 2021, 8:33 am
I recently moved from the US to the UK.

I hang my laundry to dry on the shower Rod.

Clothes are stored in an airtight container in a shed outside

We sold most of our appliances

Don’t bring any furniture that can break in the move. Not worth it.

I store my linen and towels, under my bed. We got beds with shortage draws.

Invest in good closets that have shelves up to the ceiling, you’d be surprised by how much it can hold.
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amother




Diamond
 

Post Fri, Dec 03 2021, 8:38 am
Don’t bring your beds, they are probably too big for the standard Israeli apartment.

We ordered beds 2 months before we moved and they were shipped to us they day we arrived.
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amother




Strawberry
 

Post Fri, Dec 03 2021, 8:50 am
FranticFrummie wrote:
This is really true. You'll find that the basic essentials are really all you need.
Kids play outdoors everywhere. From about age 4 and up (or younger if they have an older sibling with them) you will see them out on the streets until late into the night. Many kids don't seem to have a set bed time, even on school nights. Little kids also take the bus by themselves starting at around age 5. For someone who's not used to it, it can be nerve wracking at first.


The kids playing alone from age 4-5 and taking the bus by themselves at that age is something you mainly see in charedi neighborhoods. Very uncommon in mixed secular-dati leumi cities.

Kids do stay up late here, that is true, especially in the summer.
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amother




Floralwhite
 

Post Sat, Dec 04 2021, 1:16 pm
1. In the type of machsan you just described it should be fine.

2. I brought my American washing machine over and used it with a transformer for 3 years. Worked fine.

3. Everyone uses hanging racks and you can put them anywhere. I've seen people put them along the wall in their dining room or an unused corner of a bedroom.

4. Linen - I have a closet in one of the bedrooms that is for linen only. Toiletries and medicines - in bathrooms.

5. Hooks in a hallway in my apartment. Coats go on the hooks and backbacks on the floor underneath.

6. They're not shared. Like others said, kids are outside all the time - on porches, in front of the building, in the park

7. I purchased a fridge, oven, two sets of bunkbeds, and two American style matresses that went on the floor until the beds came with the lift. There are a lot of Isreali furniture and appliance companies that have websites and deliver and if you can have a friend/relative available to open the door when they come it will make things so much easier when you first get here. (Try Appliance Direct for appliances.)
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LovesHashem




 
 
 
 

Post Sat, Dec 04 2021, 1:18 pm
amother [ Diamond ] wrote:
Don’t bring your beds, they are probably too big for the standard Israeli apartment.

We ordered beds 2 months before we moved and they were shipped to us they day we arrived.


Unless you buy an apartment and know the measurements.
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chanchy123




 
 
 
 

Post Sun, Dec 05 2021, 1:58 pm
FranticFrummie wrote:
This is really true. You'll find that the basic essentials are really all you need.
Kids play outdoors everywhere. From about age 4 and up (or younger if they have an older sibling with them) you will see them out on the streets until late into the night. Many kids don't seem to have a set bed time, even on school nights. Little kids also take the bus by themselves starting at around age 5. For someone who's not used to it, it can be nerve wracking at first.

None of this is true for my world. I don’t personally know anyone who lives like this, although this is my stigmatic concept of what some chareidi neighborhoods are like (and I know that’s just the very extreme minority).
This is NOT the Israeli way of life, maybe a very small minority live like this.
Yes, kids have more freedom here but it’s not normal for four-year-olds or younger to the roam the streets all hours of the night or for five-year-olds to ride the bus alone, it’s just not.
Kids play in the park/playground or common areas under their buildings if they don’t have backyards or big porches.
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essie14




 
 
 
 

Post Sun, Dec 05 2021, 2:07 pm
chanchy123 wrote:
None of this is true for my world. I don’t personally know anyone who lives like this, although this is my stigmatic concept of what some chareidi neighborhoods are like (and I know that’s just the very extreme minority).
This is NOT the Israeli way of life, maybe a very small minority live like this.
Yes, kids have more freedom here but it’s not normal for four-year-olds or younger to the roam the streets all hours of the night or for five-year-olds to ride the bus alone, it’s just not.
Kids play in the park/playground or common areas under their buildings if they don’t have backyards or big porches.

No one in my neighborhood lets any children under 8 go anywhere alone. No way, no how.
That's not my experience AT ALL!!!!!
The kids play in the shared chanaya area and in the local parks.

Never saw a 5 year old on a bus alone.
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