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Infant carseat recommendation please!

 
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amother




OP
 

Post Mon, May 09 2022, 12:30 pm
Looking for recommendations for infant carseat please!
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amother




Moccasin
 

Post Mon, May 09 2022, 12:40 pm
We always go with graco. Highly rated and well priced
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Amarante




 
 
 
 

Post Mon, May 09 2022, 12:43 pm
I was just reading recommendations regarding infant cars seats.

Even if you don't go by their recommendations the article is full of information regarding what to look for in a seat

https://www.nytimes.com/wirecu.....seat/

They had other recommendations and an explanation as to how they judged seats

Graco SnugRide SnugFit 35 DLX

The best infant car seat

The Graco SnugRide SnugFit 35 is easier to install, adjust, and operate than seats that cost far more. And it has an added safety feature: an anti-rebound base.

$400* from Amazon
$230 from BuyBuy Baby

*At the time of publishing, the price was $210.
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Hashem_Yaazor




 
 
 
 

Post Mon, May 09 2022, 12:45 pm
Go for the lightest weight you can find in your price range if you plan on taking it in and out.
Premium latch if you'll be taking the base in and out of a position with latch
Anti rebound if you can afford it but it's still safe without
Front adjusting is a must
I like to get up to 32 lbs but kids generally outgrow by height quicker than weight
If you have a stroller to use with a car seat, something that works with it
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amother




OP
 

Post Mon, May 09 2022, 1:05 pm
Thank you all.

So if I get the Graco SnugRide SnugFit 35 DLX, which was the first choice in that article Amarante linked, is that too heavyweight because goes up to 35 lb?
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amother




Whitesmoke
 

Post Mon, May 09 2022, 1:06 pm
Maxi cosi and Nuna both make very light ones
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amother




Moccasin
 

Post Mon, May 09 2022, 1:16 pm
amother [ OP ] wrote:
Thank you all.

So if I get the Graco SnugRide SnugFit 35 DLX, which was the first choice in that article Amarante linked, is that too heavyweight because goes up to 35 lb?


How heavy it is has nothing to do with the max weight it accommodates. They’re 2 separate specs
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Hashem_Yaazor




 
 
 
 

Post Mon, May 09 2022, 1:26 pm
That one isn't the lightest Graco. I'd look for more like 7.5-8 lbs vs 10 lbs
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amother




OP
 

Post Mon, May 09 2022, 1:27 pm
amother [ Moccasin ] wrote:
How heavy it is has nothing to do with the max weight it accommodates. They’re 2 separate specs


In my experience, it does correlate. The higher max weight carseats usually weigh more.
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Amarante




 
 
 
 

Post Mon, May 09 2022, 1:30 pm
amother [ OP ] wrote:
Thank you all.

So if I get the Graco SnugRide SnugFit 35 DLX, which was the first choice in that article Amarante linked, is that too heavyweight because goes up to 35 lb?


Can you read the article because it has excellent information on how they chose. They had other suggestions and one of those might be better for your specific needs.

If you can’t open the link I can post it for you when I am back at my computer.
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amother




OP
 

Post Mon, May 09 2022, 1:36 pm
Hashem_Yaazor wrote:
That one isn't the lightest Graco. I'd look for more like 7.5-8 lbs vs 10 lbs


Do you have one that you recommend? Thanks!
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amother




Orchid
 

Post Mon, May 09 2022, 1:37 pm
I have the Graco. Bought it a year ago from target on sale for $169

here is a link:
https://www.target.com/p/graco.....79062

I love it, it's not that much heavier than the other models. It's super easy to clean and looks really sleek. I did a ton of research before buying it. My baby will be one next week and is nowhere close to outgrowing it. She is an average sized baby (wearing size 12 months clothing at 12 months...)

eta: I didnt mind that it's a little heavier. the convenience of easy to remove and wash lining, and the 1-touch handle adjustments, and extra safety features were much more important for me.
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Hashem_Yaazor




 
 
 
 

Post Mon, May 09 2022, 2:22 pm
7.2lbs but no anti rebound bar
https://www.target.com/p/graco.....08019
Don't know what features you are willing to pay for..

I have an Evenflo SafeMax right now though it's out of stock. I don't need it to work with a stroller and it's about 7 lbs as well and comes with an anti rebound bar. Everyone has the features they need...

I was happy with my Snugride I had before. No anti rebound bar but it's still safe without it.
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amother




Caramel
 

Post Mon, May 09 2022, 2:24 pm
amother [ Whitesmoke ] wrote:
Maxi cosi and Nuna both make very light ones

I have a nuna and it's very light, but honestly it didn't make much of a difference in the long run. Once your baby is a few months old and chubby and heavy iyh, its going to be a huge pain to shlep regardless.
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amother




OP
 

Post Mon, May 09 2022, 2:24 pm
Thanks. What exactly does the anti rebound bar do?

It wasn't around with my previous carseats!
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amother




Anemone
 

Post Mon, May 09 2022, 2:26 pm
I love my nuna
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Amarante




 
 
 
 

Post Mon, May 09 2022, 2:29 pm
amother [ OP ] wrote:
Thanks. What exactly does the anti rebound bar do?

It wasn't around with my previous carseats!


Understanding optional safety features
Some infant seats—including two of our picks in this guide—come with an anti-rebound base or a load leg, added safety features that can improve the seat’s performance and stability in a crash. (The Graco SnugRide SnugFit 35 DLX, our top pick, has an anti-rebound base; the Clek Liing, our upgrade pick, has a load leg.) Both features have been popular on infant seat models sold in Canada and abroad for years, but they have only recently become more common in the United States.

An anti-rebound base, also known as an anti-rebound bar, is a metal bar built into the foot-end of the seat base, which rests flush against the vehicle seat; it’s designed to help decrease the car seat’s movement. In a front-impact collision, an infant seat moves forward and down and then “rebounds” back, potentially sending its passenger face-first into the back of the vehicle seat. The anti-rebound base can minimize that rebound effect.

A load leg is a metal pole that connects from the base of the infant seat to the floor of the car, making the seat more stable and absorbing some of the impact of a crash. Load legs can be installed in most—but not all—cars. So before you buy a seat with a load leg, you’ll want to confirm that your car’s make and model can accommodate one. And you should find out if there’s a particular position in the back where it should be used.

Both anti-rebound bases and load legs have the potential to improve the performance of an infant car seat. Of these two features, a load leg may be more effective, since the load leg serves the dual function of reducing movement and absorbing some of the initial impact of the crash without transferring it to the child.

In its independent crash-testing of infant car seats, Consumer Reports concluded that the risk of a head injury was about 46% less with the use of a load leg. (CR also noted, however, that a load leg isn’t required to achieve the best-possible crash-test results; some of the seats it tested that didn’t have a load leg still achieved those results.) The Clek Liing infant seat was subjected to crash testing by the manufacturer with and without its load leg, as documented in this video. Clek found that using the load leg could reduce the potential for injury by up to 40% compared with using the same seat without the load leg.

Although support for using load legs and anti-rebound bases is growing—as is consumer demand—there’s still a long way to go before they could be required as standard safety features. The crash tests that are being performed by the NHTSA do not currently allow for the use of load legs. So the safety advantage that load legs may provide is not reflected in the current government data. Miriam Manary, lead research engineer at the University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute, points out this strange disconnect: “The US does not regulate or encourage the use of load legs, [but they do] have a safety benefit, for sure.”
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amother




Orchid
 

Post Mon, May 09 2022, 3:08 pm
The "extra safety features" are really extra and my 2 things I wanted most were easy to clean and removable fabric and the 1-touch adjustment.
Once I have it, I like the rebound bar- I actually notice a difference and the carseat barely moves when installed with a seatbelt (1 of my cars don't have anchors for securing the base). Unlike the graco snugride I had from 11 years ago which tended to slide even when strapped in.
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amother




Brown
 

Post Mon, May 09 2022, 3:47 pm
Love the Clek Liing! Feels very stable, and my LO is still comfortable in it at 1 year.
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amother




OP
 

Post Mon, May 09 2022, 6:55 pm
Amarante wrote:
Understanding optional safety features
Some infant seats—including two of our picks in this guide—come with an anti-rebound base or a load leg, added safety features that can improve the seat’s performance and stability in a crash. (The Graco SnugRide SnugFit 35 DLX, our top pick, has an anti-rebound base; the Clek Liing, our upgrade pick, has a load leg.) Both features have been popular on infant seat models sold in Canada and abroad for years, but they have only recently become more common in the United States.

An anti-rebound base, also known as an anti-rebound bar, is a metal bar built into the foot-end of the seat base, which rests flush against the vehicle seat; it’s designed to help decrease the car seat’s movement. In a front-impact collision, an infant seat moves forward and down and then “rebounds” back, potentially sending its passenger face-first into the back of the vehicle seat. The anti-rebound base can minimize that rebound effect.

A load leg is a metal pole that connects from the base of the infant seat to the floor of the car, making the seat more stable and absorbing some of the impact of a crash. Load legs can be installed in most—but not all—cars. So before you buy a seat with a load leg, you’ll want to confirm that your car’s make and model can accommodate one. And you should find out if there’s a particular position in the back where it should be used.

Both anti-rebound bases and load legs have the potential to improve the performance of an infant car seat. Of these two features, a load leg may be more effective, since the load leg serves the dual function of reducing movement and absorbing some of the initial impact of the crash without transferring it to the child.

In its independent crash-testing of infant car seats, Consumer Reports concluded that the risk of a head injury was about 46% less with the use of a load leg. (CR also noted, however, that a load leg isn’t required to achieve the best-possible crash-test results; some of the seats it tested that didn’t have a load leg still achieved those results.) The Clek Liing infant seat was subjected to crash testing by the manufacturer with and without its load leg, as documented in this video. Clek found that using the load leg could reduce the potential for injury by up to 40% compared with using the same seat without the load leg.

Although support for using load legs and anti-rebound bases is growing—as is consumer demand—there’s still a long way to go before they could be required as standard safety features. The crash tests that are being performed by the NHTSA do not currently allow for the use of load legs. So the safety advantage that load legs may provide is not reflected in the current government data. Miriam Manary, lead research engineer at the University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute, points out this strange disconnect: “The US does not regulate or encourage the use of load legs, [but they do] have a safety benefit, for sure.”


Thank you!
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