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Recipe for blintz pie
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tweety1




 
 
 
 

Post Tue, May 17 2022, 4:38 pm
Looking for a delicious recipe for a blintz pie. The one with layers crepes and cheese. Tried and true. TIA.
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amother




Darkblue
 

Post Tue, May 17 2022, 5:30 pm
Following
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Amarante




 
 
 
 

Post Tue, May 17 2022, 5:48 pm
Did you mean a blintz casserole? This is an excellent version - see her notes regarding the cheese to use for best results.

ETA - You can up the flavor by adding some vanilla extract and lemon zest. Also a bit more sugar if that is to your taste.

GLoria Kaufer Greene, The New Jewish Holiday Cookbook. Time Books.

Quick-and-Easy Cheese Blintz Casserole

Though cheese blintzes rate as an all-time favorite in my family, I don't always have the time to prepare them in the usual fashion. Therefore, I created the following casserole, which has a fantastic flavor very similar to blintzes (some say it's even better); yet it takes only a few minutes to prepare. In fact, I make it often throughout the year.

It is quite different from the popular cheese blintz casseroles made with frozen commercial blintzes. For my version, a layer of cheese filling is baked between two light layers of a special blintz-type batter. The casserole is then cut into squares for serving, making it a perfect choice for a dairy buffet and great for Shavuot.

Since the first edition of this book was published, this layered blintz casserole has proven to be one of its most popular recipes. The dish is served at the famous Moosewood Restaurant in Ithaca, New York, where it has become a favorite brunch offering under the name "Easy Cheese Blintz Puff." And the recipe has appeared in a number of books and magazines. Like some of the other "creative" recipes in this book, this one appears to be on its way to becoming a classic of "new" Jewish cooking.

Notes: The types of cheese in the filling were determined after much experimentation with various mixtures. It is the best combination to produce the desired results of separate layers.

The top of this casserole is rather plain. If desired, it may be sprinkled lightly with cinnamon or cinnamon-sugar before the casserole is returned to the oven for the final baking.

Ingredients

Makes about 8 servings as a main course, more as a side dish or buffet dish

Batter:

4 large eggs (no substitutes)
1 1/4 cups milk
2 tablespoons sour cream
1/4 cup butter, melted (for best flavor, no substitutes)
3/4 teaspoon vanilla extract
1 1/3 cups all-purpose flour
1 to 2 tablespoons sugar
1 1/4 teaspoons baking powder

Filling (see notes):

2 (7 1/2- to 8-ounce) packages curd-style farmer cheese
1 (15- to 16-ounce) container ricotta cheese, any type
2 large eggs or 1/2 cup egg substitute
2 to 3 tablespoons sugar
2 tablespoons lemon juice

To serve:

sour cream
plain or vanilla yogurt
applesauce
sliced fresh strawberries or other fruit
Step 1

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Butter a 9 by 13-inch baking dish or coat it with nonstick cooking spray.

Step 2

In a blender or a food processor (fitted with a steel blade), combine all batter ingredients. Process until very smooth, scraping down the sides of the container once or twice. Measure out 1 1/2 cups of the batter, and pour it into the bottom of the prepared baking dish. Bake at 350 degrees forabout 10 minutes, or until it is set.

Step 3

Meanwhile, combine all the filling ingredients in a large bowl, and mix them well. When the bottom layer has set, remove it from the oven and spread the filling over it, smoothing the top. Give the remaining batter a brief stir to resuspend the ingredients; then very slowly pour it over the cheese filling so the filling is completely covered. Carefully return the casserole to the 350 degree oven, and bake an additional 35 to 40 minutes, or until the top is puffed and set.

Step 4

Let the casserole rest for about 10 minutes before cutting it into squares. Serve with your choice of accompaniments.


Last edited by Amarante on Wed, May 18 2022, 7:36 am; edited 1 time in total
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tweety1




 
 
 
 

Post Tue, May 17 2022, 5:53 pm
Amarante wrote:
Did you mean a blintz casserole? This is an excellent version - see her notes regarding the cheese to use for best results.

GLoria Kaufer Greene, The New Jewish Holiday Cookbook. Time Books.

Quick-and-Easy Cheese Blintz Casserole

Though cheese blintzes rate as an all-time favorite in my family, I don't always have the time to prepare them in the usual fashion. Therefore, I created the following casserole, which has a fantastic flavor very similar to blintzes (some say it's even better); yet it takes only a few minutes to prepare. In fact, I make it often throughout the year.

It is quite different from the popular cheese blintz casseroles made with frozen commercial blintzes. For my version, a layer of cheese filling is baked between two light layers of a special blintz-type batter. The casserole is then cut into squares for serving, making it a perfect choice for a dairy buffet and great for Shavuot.

Since the first edition of this book was published, this layered blintz casserole has proven to be one of its most popular recipes. The dish is served at the famous Moosewood Restaurant in Ithaca, New York, where it has become a favorite brunch offering under the name "Easy Cheese Blintz Puff." And the recipe has appeared in a number of books and magazines. Like some of the other "creative" recipes in this book, this one appears to be on its way to becoming a classic of "new" Jewish cooking.

Notes: The types of cheese in the filling were determined after much experimentation with various mixtures. It is the best combination to produce the desired results of separate layers.

The top of this casserole is rather plain. If desired, it may be sprinkled lightly with cinnamon or cinnamon-sugar before the casserole is returned to the oven for the final baking.

Ingredients

Makes about 8 servings as a main course, more as a side dish or buffet dish

Batter:

4 large eggs (no substitutes)
1 1/4 cups milk
2 tablespoons sour cream
1/4 cup butter, melted (for best flavor, no substitutes)
3/4 teaspoon vanilla extract
1 1/3 cups all-purpose flour
1 to 2 tablespoons sugar
1 1/4 teaspoons baking powder

Filling (see notes):

2 (7 1/2- to 8-ounce) packages curd-style farmer cheese
1 (15- to 16-ounce) container ricotta cheese, any type
2 large eggs or 1/2 cup egg substitute
2 to 3 tablespoons sugar
2 tablespoons lemon juice

To serve:

sour cream
plain or vanilla yogurt
applesauce
sliced fresh strawberries or other fruit
Step 1

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Butter a 9 by 13-inch baking dish or coat it with nonstick cooking spray.

Step 2

In a blender or a food processor (fitted with a steel blade), combine all batter ingredients. Process until very smooth, scraping down the sides of the container once or twice. Measure out 1 1/2 cups of the batter, and pour it into the bottom of the prepared baking dish. Bake at 350 degrees forabout 10 minutes, or until it is set.

Step 3

Meanwhile, combine all the filling ingredients in a large bowl, and mix them well. When the bottom layer has set, remove it from the oven and spread the filling over it, smoothing the top. Give the remaining batter a brief stir to resuspend the ingredients; then very slowly pour it over the cheese filling so the filling is completely covered. Carefully return the casserole to the 350 degree oven, and bake an additional 35 to 40 minutes, or until the top is puffed and set.

Step 4

Let the casserole rest for about 10 minutes before cutting it into squares. Serve with your choice of accompaniments.

Thanks alot but no. What I'm looking for is crepe, cheese, crepe, cheese. Kosher.com has one. I tried a shvous recipe this week from there and it was a total flop. That's why I want something tried and true.
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amother




Forsythia
 

Post Tue, May 17 2022, 6:19 pm
Blintz soufflé is great.
https://jamiegeller.com/recipe.....ffle/
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amother




Natural
 

Post Tue, May 17 2022, 9:05 pm
Amarante I'm trying this!!!
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etky




 
 
 
 

Post Tue, May 17 2022, 9:55 pm
amother [ Natural ] wrote:
Amarante I'm trying this!!!


Me too!
Except that I need someone to tell me what the Israeli equivalent of curd-style farmer cheese is Confused

I know that the substitution for regular farmer's cheese is Tuv-Ta'am or Cna'an, but I don't know what curd-style farmer's cheese is. Anyone?
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yiddishmom




 
 
 
 

Post Tue, May 17 2022, 10:33 pm
I had to do a double take, because I asked the same question last year and Amarante was so kind and nice to post the above recipe.

https://www.imamother.com/foru.....98726

Anyhow, I ended up using my regular blintz recipe at the time, but I did find a different recipe sometime afterwards. I think I have it saved on my computer. Will try to remember to post it tomorrow bln.
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tweety1




 
 
 
 

Post Wed, May 18 2022, 3:58 am
yiddishmom wrote:
I had to do a double take, because I asked the same question last year and Amarante was so kind and nice to post the above recipe.

https://www.imamother.com/foru.....98726

Anyhow, I ended up using my regular blintz recipe at the time, but I did find a different recipe sometime afterwards. I think I have it saved on my computer. Will try to remember to post it tomorrow bln.

The picture posted on this thread is what I'm looking for.
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yiddishmom




 
 
 
 

Post Wed, May 18 2022, 7:19 am
Here is the recipe:

Crepes:
¾ cup milk
2 eggs
¼ tsp. baking soda
1 cup flour
4 Tbsp. oil
½ Tbsp. vanilla
¼ cup sugar


Filling:
1 pound cottage cheese/ Farmer's cheese (original recipe calls for 500 grams, which is a little more than 1 pound)
½ cup sugar
1 tsp. vanilla
1 Tbsp. lemon juice

After assembling, refrigerate to at least 8 hours.
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Amarante




 
 
 
 

Post Wed, May 18 2022, 7:32 am
etky wrote:
Me too!
Except that I need someone to tell me what the Israeli equivalent of curd-style farmer cheese is Confused

I know that the substitution for regular farmer's cheese is Tuv-Ta'am or Cna'an, but I don't know what curd-style farmer's cheese is. Anyone?


I think what is meant is "true" farmers cheese which is dry and solid as opposed to wetter cheese like a cottage cheese. It is sometimes also called "pot cheese" but that might be archaic name since I remember my Bubbe calling it that sometimes when I was a child.

I am not a cheesemaker but my understanding is that farmers cheese is essentially cottage cheese in which all of the liquid has been drained so that what remains is very dry and almost solid as it consists of the curds which are the solid part since the whey which is the liquid has been drained and squeezed out.

I think the recipe stresses this since farmers cheese aka known as "pot cheese" is not a common ingredient in the US anymore as ricotta and cottage cheese seem to have replaced it. I know my Bubbe used to cook with it and it was there with the other cheeses in the "appetizing" store or section of the store or in packages with the rest of the stuff but has to be searched for in the USA.

ETA - If your Israeli cheese is "wet" you could probably just drain it to get rid of the whey. Years ago I used to do this with regular yogurt to get a more solid consistency before Greek style yogurt was common. You could probably also do this with regular cottage cheese if you couldn't get farmers cheese in the store. If you google there are easy directions for turning cottage cheese into farmers cheese.
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etky




 
 
 
 

Post Wed, May 18 2022, 7:49 am
Amarante wrote:
I think what is meant is "true" farmers cheese which is dry and solid as opposed to wetter cheese like a cottage cheese. It is sometimes also called "pot cheese" but that might be archaic name since I remember my Bubbe calling it that sometimes when I was a child.

I am not a cheesemaker but my understanding is that farmers cheese is essentially cottage cheese in which all of the liquid has been drained so that what remains is very dry and almost solid as it consists of the curds which are the solid part since the whey which is the liquid has been drained and squeezed out.

I think the recipe stresses this since farmers cheese aka known as "pot cheese" is not a common ingredient in the US anymore as ricotta and cottage cheese seem to have replaced it. I know my Bubbe used to cook with it and it was there with the other cheeses in the "appetizing" store or section of the store or in packages with the rest of the stuff but has to be searched for in the USA.

ETA - If your Israeli cheese is "wet" you could probably just drain it to get rid of the whey. Years ago I used to do this with regular yogurt to get a more solid consistency before Greek style yogurt was common. You could probably also do this with regular cottage cheese if you couldn't get farmers cheese in the store. If you google there are easy directions for turning cottage cheese into farmers cheese.


Thanks. This makes sense. The cheese I'm thinking of is somewhat wet. I have cheesecloth so maybe I will wrap it in that and strain it overnight.
At least now we can get real Ricotta here. In previous years we'd just sub cottage cheese.
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amother




Natural
 

Post Wed, May 18 2022, 2:55 pm
Do you know if it's possible to freeze this recipe?
Thanks!
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amother




Natural
 

Post Wed, May 18 2022, 2:59 pm
Yiddishmom, just to confirm, in your recipe the filling is never cooked or baked as it is with blintzes, correct?
Does it still taste like fried blintzes or is it something else?
Also, was it very time consuming to do all that layering?
Thanks!
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yiddishmom




 
 
 
 

Post Wed, May 18 2022, 3:39 pm
I never tried freezing, but I don't see why it shouldn't work. It's the same as regular blintzes.

@Natural, correct, its never cooked or baked. I think the layering is less time consuming than rolling each blintz separately.


You can smear any topping of your choice on top and make it look pretty.

Caramel cream, chocolate shreds/ curls, klik balls, cherry pie filling, blueberry pie filling.
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amother




Natural
 

Post Wed, May 18 2022, 5:42 pm
Thank you yiddishmom!
Amarante have you made that recipe before? Do you know if it freezes well? Or how many days in advance it can be made?
Thanks!!
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tweety1




 
 
 
 

Post Wed, May 18 2022, 5:56 pm
yiddishmom wrote:
Here is the recipe:

Crepes:
¾ cup milk
2 eggs
¼ tsp. baking soda
1 cup flour
4 Tbsp. oil
½ Tbsp. vanilla
¼ cup sugar


Filling:
1 pound cottage cheese/ Farmer's cheese (original recipe calls for 500 grams, which is a little more than 1 pound)
½ cup sugar
1 tsp. vanilla
1 Tbsp. lemon juice

After assembling, refrigerate to at least 8 hours.

Thanks loads. Can't wait to make it
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bsy




 
 
 
 

Post Wed, May 18 2022, 6:29 pm
We use our regular cheese blintz recipe and just layer it in a round pan instead of rolling blintzes.
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jewishmom6




 
 
 
 

Post Thu, May 19 2022, 8:44 am
There is a recipe for this in the new Balubuste cookbook.
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tweety1




 
 
 
 

Post Thu, May 19 2022, 9:03 am
jewishmom6 wrote:
There is a recipe for this in the new Balubuste cookbook.

#3? I have 2 and 3. I didn't notice it. I actually skimmed through it for something else. I'll look for it. Thanks.
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