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Recipe for blintz pie
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Amarante




 
 
 
 

Post Thu, May 19 2022, 10:13 am
amother [ Natural ] wrote:
Thank you yiddishmom!
Amarante have you made that recipe before? Do you know if it freezes well? Or how many days in advance it can be made?
Thanks!!


I have made this and I personally would not freeze it.

Also you are not gaining much time because the recipe comes together very quickly. If you are super pressed for time make the dry mixture ahead of time and then combine it with the wet ingredients to make the batter when you are ready to make. Think of it as a cake mix. 😂

You can also make the cheese layer ahead of time and mix the ingredients and just keep in the refrigerator until you are ready to assemble just before baking.


Last edited by Amarante on Thu, May 19 2022, 12:24 pm; edited 1 time in total
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amother




Natural
 

Post Thu, May 19 2022, 10:42 am
Thank you for the tip!
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WitchKitty




 
 
 
 

Post Thu, May 19 2022, 11:46 am
Amarante,
When you explained substituting farmer's cheese, you explained what texture the cheese should be, but I'm wondering about the taste.
Drained cottage cheese and Tuv Ta'am taste very differently,
and I've never actually tasted farmer's cheese. (Or ricotta for that matter, but I can get that here)
Which would be preferable, and what is the point of using 2 different cheeses in the recipe? Is it only for texture?
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Amarante




 
 
 
 

Post Thu, May 19 2022, 12:14 pm
WitchKitty wrote:
Amarante,
When you explained substituting farmer's cheese, you explained what texture the cheese should be, but I'm wondering about the taste.
Drained cottage cheese and Tuv Ta'am taste very differently,
and I've never actually tasted farmer's cheese. (Or ricotta for that matter, but I can get that here)
Which would be preferable, and what is the point of using 2 different cheeses in the recipe? Is it only for texture?


I followed the recipe because the creator was so adamant about having tested various types of cheeses 🤷‍♀️🤷‍♀️

I don’t know what Tiv Ta’am tastes like so I can’t help. Farmers Cheese is literally cottage cheese with the whey pressed out so it is firm. Although I have no plans to make it, it is very easy to make with milk which is why it is called farmers cheese because anyone with milk can make it.

I am not a cheese maker but my understanding is that ricotta is made from the whey and not the curds so it tastes somewhat different and has a slightly different texture and is a bit more complicated to make although is still not a super complicated cheese to make

Ricotta is made from the whey of milk not the curds. Typically boiled or scalded with a culture to get it thickened. Farmers cheese is a fresh cheese made from fresh curds that are light pressed to remove some but not all of the whey. Like drained cottage cheese.
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Amarante




 
 
 
 

Post Thu, May 19 2022, 12:21 pm
It is interesting that farmers cheese or pot cheese doesn’t exist in Israel because it was such an iconic food for the Ashkenazi of Eastern Europe and was pretty ubiquitous in all the markets in Brooklyn when I was growing up. But it was of my Bubbe’s generation so maybe it is one of those food tastes that are dying out. I don’t see much smoked whole whitefish anymore and my grandparents would have that along with the lox or more accurately Nova along with herring in cream sauce.

FWIW I am almost positive that my Bubbe would have used Farmers Cheese for her blintzes because her filling was dry and relatively solid.

I found this article which might help

My grandfather, whose parents immigrated to Canada from a Polish shtetl, loved farmer’s cheese. It was always on the table at breakfast in his house, next to the cereal and grapefruit halves my grandparents also liked to eat.

After my grandparents died, I forgot about farmer’s cheese until I saw a whole refrigerated section devoted to it at a local Slavic grocery. I took a tub home. It was bright, tangy, and surprisingly lean-tasting, falling somewhere in between a labne and a dry ricotta. But what exactly was it?

To find out, I talked to Dean Sommer, cheese technologist at the University of Wisconsin–Madison’s Center for Dairy Research. Sommer explained that what I was eating was one of two styles of soft, fresh farmer’s cheese.

European-Style Farmer’s Cheese. Also called twaróg, tvorog, or syr, among other names. Found in almost every Slavic, Baltic, and Germanic country.

American-Style Farmer’s Cheese. This is basically cottage cheese that has been pressed to remove water.

European- and American-style farmer’s cheeses are similar in many ways. They’re both simple cheeses that are easy to make at home—many cooks did and still do. They’re also acid-set cheeses, meaning that they’re made when milk is soured to a point where it can coagulate, using either vinegar or a cultured product such as yogurt or buttermilk. The main difference between them is how the coagulated milk is processed.

With European-style farmer’s cheese, the coagulated milk is simply ladled into a sack and drained, yielding a creamy, spreadable finished texture. With American-style farmer’s cheese, it’s cut into curds, drained, and pressed, creating a firmer, drier texture. But they’re both refreshingly bright and tart.

The simplest way to eat either is to treat them like plain yogurt, eaten with a little jam, honey, or fruit. Or you can spread the farmer’s cheese on toast, with either more jam or savory accompaniments such as green onions or tomatoes.

European-style farmer’s cheese is traditionally used in a host of other applications, both sweet and savory, cooked and uncooked. Uses vary regionally, but some commonalities remain. It’s critical to making different types of cheesecake—käsekuchen in Germany and sernik in Poland, biezpienmaize in Latvia and varškės pyragas in Lithuania. It’s often used as a filling (either on its own, or mixed with potato) for pierogi and vareniki. And it’s mixed with chives and radish to make a savory Polish spread called gzik.

No matter how you use these two fresh cheeses, they’re delicious—and worth seeking out



https://www.americastestkitche.....heese


Last edited by Amarante on Thu, May 19 2022, 12:33 pm; edited 1 time in total
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Amarante




 
 
 
 

Post Thu, May 19 2022, 12:32 pm
I was watching a show yesterday and they visited the Lady M Bakery in Los Angeles. They were raving about their Crepe Cake which sells for $98. As far as I can tell it is just multiple layers of crepes with filling. 🤷‍♀️ and a crepe is a blintz wrapper 🤷‍♀️🤷‍♀️

Here is a link to their cakes - prices like this for relatively simple stuff is why I bake.

https://www.ladym.com


Last edited by Amarante on Thu, May 19 2022, 1:53 pm; edited 1 time in total
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etky




 
 
 
 

Post Thu, May 19 2022, 12:57 pm
Amarante wrote:
It is interesting that farmers cheese or pot cheese doesn’t exist in Israel because it was such an iconic food for the Ashkenazi of Eastern Europe and was pretty ubiquitous in all the markets in Brooklyn when I was growing up. But it was of my Bubbe’s generation so maybe it is one of those food tastes that are dying out. I don’t see much smoked whole whitefish anymore and my grandparents would have that along with the lox or more accurately Nova along with herring in cream sauce.

FWIW I am almost positive that my Bubbe would have used Farmers Cheese for her blintzes because her filling was dry and relatively solid.

I found this article which might help

My grandfather, whose parents immigrated to Canada from a Polish shtetl, loved farmer’s cheese. It was always on the table at breakfast in his house, next to the cereal and grapefruit halves my grandparents also liked to eat.

After my grandparents died, I forgot about farmer’s cheese until I saw a whole refrigerated section devoted to it at a local Slavic grocery. I took a tub home. It was bright, tangy, and surprisingly lean-tasting, falling somewhere in between a labne and a dry ricotta. But what exactly was it?

To find out, I talked to Dean Sommer, cheese technologist at the University of Wisconsin–Madison’s Center for Dairy Research. Sommer explained that what I was eating was one of two styles of soft, fresh farmer’s cheese.

European-Style Farmer’s Cheese. Also called twaróg, tvorog, or syr, among other names. Found in almost every Slavic, Baltic, and Germanic country.

American-Style Farmer’s Cheese. This is basically cottage cheese that has been pressed to remove water.

European- and American-style farmer’s cheeses are similar in many ways. They’re both simple cheeses that are easy to make at home—many cooks did and still do. They’re also acid-set cheeses, meaning that they’re made when milk is soured to a point where it can coagulate, using either vinegar or a cultured product such as yogurt or buttermilk. The main difference between them is how the coagulated milk is processed.

With European-style farmer’s cheese, the coagulated milk is simply ladled into a sack and drained, yielding a creamy, spreadable finished texture. With American-style farmer’s cheese, it’s cut into curds, drained, and pressed, creating a firmer, drier texture. But they’re both refreshingly bright and tart.

The simplest way to eat either is to treat them like plain yogurt, eaten with a little jam, honey, or fruit. Or you can spread the farmer’s cheese on toast, with either more jam or savory accompaniments such as green onions or tomatoes.

European-style farmer’s cheese is traditionally used in a host of other applications, both sweet and savory, cooked and uncooked. Uses vary regionally, but some commonalities remain. It’s critical to making different types of cheesecake—käsekuchen in Germany and sernik in Poland, biezpienmaize in Latvia and varškės pyragas in Lithuania. It’s often used as a filling (either on its own, or mixed with potato) for pierogi and vareniki. And it’s mixed with chives and radish to make a savory Polish spread called gzik.

No matter how you use these two fresh cheeses, they’re delicious—and worth seeking out



https://www.americastestkitche.....heese


So what we have here - called Tuv Ta'am or Cna'an - must be the European style farmer's cheese. They are brand names for Tvorog type cheese.
This cheese has long been manufactured in Israel but is mostly used for baking, especially cheese cake and for cheese fillings in other baked and fried foods.
Russian Israelis do use it more widely though for other applications and as a spread.
I also remember my grandmother eating farmer's cheese btw Smile
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Amarante




 
 
 
 

Post Thu, May 19 2022, 1:24 pm
etky wrote:
So what we have here - called Tuv Ta'am or Cna'an - must be the European style farmer's cheese. They are brand names for Tvorog type cheese.
This cheese has long been manufactured in Israel but is mostly used for baking, especially cheese cake and for cheese fillings in other baked and fried foods.
Russian Israelis do use it more widely though for other applications and as a spread.
I also remember my grandmother eating farmer's cheese btw Smile


So based on the article, the difference between the cheeses is degree of wetness. The farmers cheese in the USA is almost solid and sold as a brick like cream cheese although it obviously it doesn’t have a creamy texture. You wouldn’t be able to spread it easily because it would crumble.

If I am stretching for comparisons it is more like a brick of feta but obviously tastes completely different.

I guess you could take the Tuv and just press out additional moisture. 🤷‍♀️🤷‍♀️
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Amarante




 
 
 
 

Post Fri, May 20 2022, 8:21 am
Motivated by the thought of a $100 Lady M Crepe Cake which is essentially a cake composed of layers of blintzes I decided to try to replicate it. I am posting the recipe I will be using in the event. that anyone else feels inspired to branch out.

The difference between the crepes and a blintz seems to be that the crepe used for the cake is much richer as it has both butter and cream. The technique of storing the batter overnight so that the liquid is absorbed and the gluten relaxes is an interesting one. I know that there is a famous chocolate chip cookie recipe in which you have to keep the dough in the refrigerator for 24 hours for the best results.

The crepes and the pastry cream filling are made ahead of time and the cake needs to also be assembled ahead of time - could be made the day before. So even though there are multiple steps none of the steps are difficult and could be fit in - assuming one can make a blintz then a crepe is really the same technique.

I don't think one needs to caramelize the sugar with a blow torch for an acceptable result as dusting with confectioners sugar would be fine.

There are various vanilla pastry cream recipes that can be used. The one that came with this recipe seems overly complicated so I will use a simpler recipe.

twenty Layer Vanilla Cream Crepe Cake - aka Lady M Crepe Cake

For the crepes

Ingredients

7 Tbs. (3-1/2 oz.) unsalted butter, cut into tablespoons
1-1/2 cups all-purpose flour
1/2 cup granulated sugar
Pinch of salt
6 large eggs
2 cups whole milk
1-1/2 tsp. vanilla extract
1/2 tsp. finely grated orange zest
3/4 cup heavy cream
Vegetable oil or melted butter, for coating the pan

Preparation

Place the butter in a small saucepan and cook over medium heat until it melts and then turns brown and has a nutty fragrance, 4 to 6 minutes. Remove the pan from the heat.

Place the flour, sugar, and salt in the bowl of a food processor and pulse until blended. In a medium bowl, whisk together the eggs, milk, and vanilla until blended, then gradually add to the flour mixture while running the processor. Mix just until blended. Scrape down the sides of the bowl with a rubber spatula, then turn the processor on and add the orange zest and browned butter until combined. Add the cream and process until just blended. Transfer the batter to a pitcher or container with a pouring lip. Cover the container and refrigerate the batter for at least 2 hours (or up to 3 days). Don’t skip this step — chilling the batter will allow the flour to absorb the liquid and the gluten to relax.

To make the crêpes, take the batter out of the refrigerator and bring it to room temperature (otherwise the crêpes will be too thick). Stir the crêpe batter well to re-blend.
Place a 10-inch nonstick skillet over medium heat and allow it to get hot. Brush the pan with a little vegetable oil or melted butter, then pour in a scant 1/4 cup crêpe batter, rolling the pan from side to side to coat it evenly.

When the bottom of the crêpe has begun to brown, after 30 seconds to 1 minute, turn the crêpe (I use a long, nonstick offset spatula to flip it, but you can use a silicone spatula to lift up an end, then turn the crêpe over with your fingers or, if you’re really competent, you can flip it over in the air) and cook on the other side for another 10 to 15 seconds. Place the cooked crêpe on a piece of parchment paper on a plate. Continue cooking the crêpes until all the batter has been used, stacking the crêpes one on top of another as they are finished. You will need 20 perfect crêpes for this cake. Cover and store in the refrigerator until needed. The crêpes can be made 1 day ahead of time; just bring them to room temperature before using.

Assemble the cake

In the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the whisk attachment, whip the cream with 3 Tbs. of the sugar at high speed until it forms soft peaks. Remove the pastry cream from the refrigerator. Whisk it until it is smooth and stir in the Cointreau.

Gently fold one-third of the whipped cream into the pastry cream to lighten it. Fold in the remaining whipped cream.

Place a crêpe on a cake plate and top with 1/3 cup of the lightened pastry cream, spreading it over the entire crêpe with a small offset metal spatula. Top with another crêpe. Continuing layering the cream and crêpes until you have used 20 crêpes, ending with a crêpe. Refrigerate the cake for at least 4 hours (or up to 24 hours).
Right before serving, sprinkle the remaining 2 Tbs. sugar evenly on top of the cake. Caramelize the sugar by passing a butane or propane torch over the top of the cake until the sugar melts and turns brown. Serve immediately.
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amother




Seablue
 

Post Sun, May 22 2022, 8:53 am
yiddishmom wrote:
Here is the recipe:

Crepes:
¾ cup milk
2 eggs
¼ tsp. baking soda
1 cup flour
4 Tbsp. oil
½ Tbsp. vanilla
¼ cup sugar


Filling:
1 pound cottage cheese/ Farmer's cheese (original recipe calls for 500 grams, which is a little more than 1 pound)
½ cup sugar
1 tsp. vanilla
1 Tbsp. lemon juice

After assembling, refrigerate to at least 8 hours.



Do you serve it cold?
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amother




Seablue
 

Post Sun, May 22 2022, 8:53 am
yiddishmom wrote:
Here is the recipe:

Crepes:
¾ cup milk
2 eggs
¼ tsp. baking soda
1 cup flour
4 Tbsp. oil
½ Tbsp. vanilla
¼ cup sugar


Filling:
1 pound cottage cheese/ Farmer's cheese (original recipe calls for 500 grams, which is a little more than 1 pound)
½ cup sugar
1 tsp. vanilla
1 Tbsp. lemon juice

After assembling, refrigerate to at least 8 hours.


Double post
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yiddishmom




 
 
 
 

Post Sun, May 22 2022, 2:57 pm
Yes, I serve it cold.
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Hashemlovesme1




 
 
 
 

Post Sun, May 22 2022, 5:28 pm
yiddishmom wrote:
Here is the recipe:

Crepes:
¾ cup milk
2 eggs
¼ tsp. baking soda
1 cup flour
4 Tbsp. oil
½ Tbsp. vanilla
¼ cup sugar


Filling:
1 pound cottage cheese/ Farmer's cheese (original recipe calls for 500 grams, which is a little more than 1 pound)
½ cup sugar
1 tsp. vanilla
1 Tbsp. lemon juice

After assembling, refrigerate to at least 8 hours.


How do you assemble? Is it many layers or just batter-filling-batter?
Do you have to roll out the dough or is it a batter and can just be poured in layers?

Also, what size pan would this make?
This sounds so good but I never made blintzes or anything like it before! I want to try. Thanks!
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yiddishmom




 
 
 
 

Post Sun, May 22 2022, 7:50 pm
Hashemlovesme1 wrote:
How do you assemble? Is it many layers or just batter-filling-batter?
Do you have to roll out the dough or is it a batter and can just be poured in layers?

Also, what size pan would this make?
This sounds so good but I never made blintzes or anything like it before! I want to try. Thanks!


It's made just like blintzes. A batter that you pout in pan and fry on each side for a few minutes.

To assemble, start with a blintz/ crepe, spread cheese mixture, layer another blintz, spread cheese mixture, and repeat until finished.

The top layer should also be a blintz/ crepe.

I do it in a 10" pan, but any size will work. If it's smaller, you'll have more layers, and if it's larger you'll have less layers.

I pour a full ladle in the pan for one crepe. It's a bit thicker, but that's how I like it for this pie. When I make regular rolled blintzes, I make them thinner.

Depending on your preference, you can put a thicker layer of cheese or thinner.

It's a very forgiving kind of recipe. Make it your own.
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amother




Cerise
 

Post Sun, May 22 2022, 7:58 pm
tweety1 wrote:
#3? I have 2 and 3. I didn't notice it. I actually skimmed through it for something else. I'll look for it. Thanks.

Yes the last one. I also tried it and it was delicious
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amother




Darkblue
 

Post Mon, May 30 2022, 12:12 pm
tweety1 wrote:
#3? I have 2 and 3. I didn't notice it. I actually skimmed through it for something else. I'll look for it. Thanks.


Can anyone post the recipe?
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