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Can Inclusion Work?

 
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amother




OP
 

Post Sat, Jul 02 2022, 9:14 pm
Can your child with special needs be integrated into a regular camp and make real friends? (I'm not talking about being the bunk project/nebbich.] Or should they stay in a separate special needs camp where they can make true friends with other children like themselves?

Thoughts please.
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mha3484




 
 
 
 

Post Sat, Jul 02 2022, 9:16 pm
What kind of special needs are we talking about?
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amother




OP
 

Post Sat, Jul 02 2022, 9:23 pm
Down syndrome, ASD (that includes talking slowly with a monotone).
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amother




Stoneblue
 

Post Sat, Jul 02 2022, 9:31 pm
I have had both in my classroom (public school), at various times. Each time, the student had a personal assistant, which was definitely needed. The other kids were very kind and caring, it really warmed my heart. There was an excellent special ed teacher who pushed in at various times, pulled out for various intervention programs, and worked closely with me to modify classwork. There was also an excellent speech therapist who worked on social skills and pragmatic language with the children. It can work, provided you have the sort of resources and support I did. However, I don't know about middle school.
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amother




Lightgreen
 

Post Sat, Jul 02 2022, 11:34 pm
My daughter has DS and is fully integrated in school and camp.

We live OOT and she goes to a very small school. I dont know how it would work in a bigger school. Because it's a small school everyone knows everyone and they're flexible enough that she can move between classes if she wants to. .

This summer we sent her to a new day camp so I was a bit worried how she would adjust. She's been there 2 days so far and it went great.
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creditcards




 
 
 
 

Post Sun, Jul 03 2022, 12:21 am
Is there a reason you don’t want to send the child to a special school? In my opinion that’s always the best option. My special needs daughter is popular and well liked in her special needs class. Her teachers have so much patience for her and she is a top student for her class. Why would I want her to be the case in a mainstream class? It just sets her up to be bullied. In the best case scenario kids will be nice to her but she won’t be the top and popular girl like she is in her special needs class with just 7 kids in the class and 4 teachers with all the attention in the world.
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amother




Lily
 

Post Sun, Jul 03 2022, 4:59 am
I think the ideal is a small amount of time to allow them to see peers their own age, but their learning is done in a specialist school that can actually meet her needs.
I've also found if you start integration at a young age, children are usually more accepting of differences and can even be protective, whilst if they join later, children can be more cruel.
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amother




Aqua
 

Post Sun, Jul 03 2022, 5:12 am
My child with ASD goes to a regular (but smaller) school. She was in pre1a this year. Over the course of the year, she was included in the class for approximately 85-90% of the day. When she is in the classroom, her aide is there as a general aide for anyone who needs help- so as not to single her out. I am told that she will eventually be fully mainstreamed, but we don’t want to withdraw services so quickly.
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amother




OP
 

Post Sun, Jul 03 2022, 5:52 am
My ASD child is in a special school/camp and it was the best decision we made.

My relative, though, has a son who has DS. He's in a regular school setting. She sent him to a new sleepaway camp and was freaking out because he didn't have friends. I was just wondering if it's possible for a child like this to have real friends out in the world.
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amother




Aqua
 

Post Sun, Jul 03 2022, 5:57 am
amother [ OP ] wrote:
My ASD child is in a special school/camp and it was the best decision we made.

My relative, though, has a son who has DS. He's in a regular school setting. She sent him to a new sleepaway camp and was freaking out because he didn't have friends. I was just wondering if it's possible for a child like this to have real friends out in the world.


Each child is an individual who needs the best plan for them. It’s a spectrum- which means everyone is different. As you know, DS and autism are very different- although there’s a spectrum with DS as well. I wouldn’t ever tell someone how to manage their child. I know that I have found the best plan for mine. She didn’t qualify for any special school in the area- they said the skillset of the other kids would have dragged her down. So I made the best arrangements that I could. And yes, she had friends who call her and make play dates. And I do not tell any parents her diagnoses. Her principal’s daughter is in her class- and the principal shepped such nachas watching the kids
Interact at a recent play date. Currently she’s going to a regular camp with a therapist. She rides the bus herself. She’s having a great time.
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amother




Winterberry
 

Post Sun, Jul 03 2022, 7:51 am
My special needs kids do much better in specialized settings. They are happier because they have real mutual friends. As they get older it gets harder and harder to stay in mainstream, the gap just becomes too big.
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