Home
Log in / Sign Up
    Private Messages   Advanced Search   Rules   New User Guide   FAQ   Advertise   Contact Us  
Forum -> Children's Health
Can you explain what sensory issues are?
Previous  1  2



Post new topic   Reply to topic View latest: 24h 48h 72h

amother
Blonde


 

Post Wed, Aug 17 2022, 12:41 pm
amother OP wrote:
Starting to think if dh has some sensory issues. He sometimes gets so irritated and annoyed when I touch him, while other times he loves it. Does that place him in that category?
And is it genetic?

It's definitely a possiblity, but it's impossible to say for sure just based on this information. Yes, there can be a genetic link. The only way to know if this is the right path to explore is to have an evaluation, or at the very least a detailed interview. If you're in Lakewood, Passaic or Monsey, I can post names of therapists who I know of. Maybe they'd be willing to have a phone conversation with you to explain it in more detail.
Back to top

amother
Tealblue


 

Post Wed, Aug 17 2022, 12:46 pm
My views are a little controversial, especially on this forum, but I believe that sensory issues are used to explain a lot of behaviors that aren’t really sensory issues at all, or that can have many different explanations other than sensory. And also, that sensory issues, when actually present, are a symptom of something deeper, not a cause unto themselves.
Back to top

amother
DarkCyan


 

Post Wed, Aug 17 2022, 12:47 pm
amother Tealblue wrote:
My views are a little controversial, especially on this forum, but I believe that sensory issues are used to explain a lot of behaviors that aren’t really sensory issues at all, or that can have many different explanations other than sensory. And also, that sensory issues, when actually present, are a symptom of something deeper, not a cause unto themselves.


If that's the case, how do you explain the success of sensory integration therapy?
Back to top

amother
OP


 

Post Wed, Aug 17 2022, 2:58 pm
amother Blonde wrote:
It's definitely a possiblity, but it's impossible to say for sure just based on this information. Yes, there can be a genetic link. The only way to know if this is the right path to explore is to have an evaluation, or at the very least a detailed interview. If you're in Lakewood, Passaic or Monsey, I can post names of therapists who I know of. Maybe they'd be willing to have a phone conversation with you to explain it in more detail.


Thanks for the offer! I'll have dh talk to his therapist to see what his view is on this.
Back to top

amother
Tealblue


 

Post Wed, Aug 17 2022, 3:00 pm
amother DarkCyan wrote:
If that's the case, how do you explain the success of sensory integration therapy?
I don’t see it’s major success. It’s limited, like all therapies. Can offer tools but not a cure. Lasts a little bit but doesn’t stick. Once in a while there’s a real success story.
Back to top

amother
DarkCyan


 

Post Wed, Aug 17 2022, 3:03 pm
amother Tealblue wrote:
I don’t see it’s major success. It’s limited, like all therapies. Can offer tools but not a cure. Lasts a little bit but doesn’t stick. Once in a while there’s a real success story.


This is definitely not the case. I have seen many people with complete resolution of symptoms. And the research supports this as well.
Back to top

amother
Copper


 

Post Sat, Nov 26 2022, 10:41 pm
wondering if this has to do with lack of sensory input...
I have a 5 year old who - does not seem aware when his face is dirty, shirt was accidentally put on backwards etc - almost as if he doesn't feel himself physically as much as others. Definitely different than my others were at this age - can this fall under the sensory category and if so what can be done to help him?
Back to top

amother
Coral


 

Post Sat, Nov 26 2022, 10:51 pm
Quote:
This is definitely not the case. I have seen many people with complete resolution of symptoms. And the research supports this as well.

My DS went to OT for sensory processing disorder for more than a year and I would definitely say it was a success. And 8 years later it still is. He wouldn't let me put on him any clothing except for like two things, he would come home from school with a soaking wet shirt because he would chew the collar and sleeves, he wouldn't any food that wasn't crunchy and a hard texture. Bh he was able to change all of those behaviors and more and they have never manifested themselves or anything like it since then.
Yes, there were other behaviors that did not change, but at that point you can assume they're not necessarily related to the sensory processing system and there is also something else at play
Back to top

star33




 
 
    
 

Post Tue, Nov 29 2022, 5:18 pm
It's important to understand that for a lot of people, sensory problems aren't just a matter of annoyance, they can be very physically painful
Back to top

star33




 
 
    
 

Post Tue, Nov 29 2022, 5:19 pm
amother DarkCyan wrote:
This is definitely not the case. I have seen many people with complete resolution of symptoms. And the research supports this as well.


Resolution of symptoms doesn't necessarily mean that the person doesn't still feel the issues. Some therapies lead to people hiding their sensory issues even if they still exist
Back to top

amother
Holly


 

Post Tue, Nov 29 2022, 6:17 pm
Oh my! Talk about hashgacha pratis. Someone sent me a flyer about a 3 day summit get to the root with the gutttmann sisters. Today they did day 1 on sensory. Blew my mind. So much related to my child and me. Tomorrow they are speaking on reflex integration and then on sleep, nutrition, behavior on Thursday . I told all my friends about it. YoU HAVE to listen. They are doing it for free. I learned so much. Sensory is not a joke. Can really impact someone long term. They also have recordings if you missed the first one. Here’s the link: https://pbt712.isrefer.com/go/root
Back to top

mushkamothers




 
 
    
 

Post Tue, Nov 29 2022, 6:43 pm
I was just going to say- you need to attend the free summit by the guttman sisters
Back to top

amother
Natural


 

Post Tue, Apr 18 2023, 1:08 am
My 5 year old is constantly putting things into her mouth, from toys to clothing etc. until now it’s been ok and age appropriate but I feel it getting a bit out of hand lately. Today I found her licking an item in grocery I had no intention to buy but then had no choice but to…
Not looking for a therapy recommendation or an OT etc rather if anyone can suggest activities I can do with her at home to improve this and/or objects to purchase so she satisfies the crave of having something in her mouth? Thanks!
Back to top
Page 2 of 2 Previous  1  2 Recent Topics




Post new topic   Reply to topic    Forum -> Children's Health

Related Topics Replies Last Post
Ways to help an extreme sensory seeker?
by amother
11 Mon, Jul 08 2024, 10:27 pm View last post
Can someone explain the speech therapy process here?
by amother
4 Mon, Jul 08 2024, 9:12 pm View last post
Yiddish grammarians - explain the plural fleishigS/milchigS
by amother
4 Sun, Jul 07 2024, 11:52 am View last post
Voting tomorrow: explain the basics please??
by amother
11 Fri, Jul 05 2024, 4:14 am View last post
Honda odyssey 2021- any issues
by amother
0 Wed, Jul 03 2024, 8:05 pm View last post