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Please Explain ADD

 
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amother




OP
 

Post Wed, Oct 26 2022, 9:47 pm
Can some of you give actual examples/scenarios of kids suffering from add that have issues focusing and being inattentive? And how do you know it's add and not just being lazy and/or procrastinating. I'm asking cuz it seems like dc has it and I want to look out for the right help.
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amother




Fuchsia
 

Post Wed, Oct 26 2022, 9:58 pm
Following
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amother




Peony
 

Post Wed, Oct 26 2022, 10:12 pm
It's all ADHD today, just categorised as either the inattentive type, the hyperactive type, or a mix of both. At its core, it's generally a regulation issue, this could be difficulty regulating attention and difficulty regulating emotions. Difficulty regulating attention can mean that your child can have challenges maintaining attention on things they don't find interesting, but can conversely hyperfocus on things they do find interesting, to the point that they have difficulty regulating their attention away from whatever they're doing. There's difficulty filtering the relevant from the irrelevant to above tasks. Rejection sensitivity dysphoria is also commonly associated with ADHD. ADHD tends to be underdiagnosed in girls who are better at compensating for their challenges and presenting as neurotypical even if they aren't.
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amother




OP
 

Post Wed, Oct 26 2022, 10:31 pm
amother Peony wrote:
It's all ADHD today, just categorised as either the inattentive type, the hyperactive type, or a mix of both. At its core, it's generally a regulation issue, this could be difficulty regulating attention and difficulty regulating emotions. Difficulty regulating attention can mean that your child can have challenges maintaining attention on things they don't find interesting, but can conversely hyperfocus on things they do find interesting, to the point that they have difficulty regulating their attention away from whatever they're doing. There's difficulty filtering the relevant from the irrelevant to above tasks. Rejection sensitivity dysphoria is also commonly associated with ADHD. ADHD tends to be underdiagnosed in girls who are better at compensating for their challenges and presenting as neurotypical even if they aren't.


Wow thank you for this! So informative.
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amother




Peony
 

Post Wed, Oct 26 2022, 11:00 pm
amother OP wrote:
Wow thank you for this! So informative.


There's really way more, of course, but I didn't have time to get into all of it. Sorry. But I think those are some key things.
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amother




OP
 

Post Thu, Oct 27 2022, 10:13 am
Anyone else?
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AlwaysGrateful




 
 
 
 

Post Thu, Oct 27 2022, 12:21 pm
How old and what gender? What are you seeing?

Just know people with ADHD don't necessarily have a hard time focusing on EVERTHING. They have a hard time focusing on things that are not engaging to them. If something engages them, they can often experience hyperfocus, which means that they pay attention to that thing and ignore everything else. They really have a deficit in regulating their attention, not in paying attention necessarily.

ADHD can also look similar to other issues, like receptive language disorders and anxiety. So don't self-diagnose. If a child isn't following directions, it's possible that the directions weren't fully received. If a child seems to procrastinate about something, it could be that s/he's feeling some sort of anxiety about doing that thing, or that it's some sort of sensory issue. And yes, there's always the possibility that the child doesn't have any of these issues and might just be helped by you using different parenting techniques than you've used until now (it's hard to even say if this is in the ballpark without any more info). The best thing is to ask for an evaluation, and do your research to make sure that the evaluator knows what they're doing...
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amother




OP
 

Post Thu, Oct 27 2022, 12:31 pm
11 yr old boy. He's hyperfocused on one thing and with poor time management skills it's a disaster. An everyday struggle. By whom would I get him evaluated?
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mha3484




 
 
 
 

Post Thu, Oct 27 2022, 12:51 pm
You should do a neuropysch eval. Where do you live?
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amother




Saddlebrown
 

Post Thu, Oct 27 2022, 12:57 pm
Hope I'm not hijacking, but I have a similar question

My DS is having a hard time now that he's in high school. I've mentioned to his rebbe and principal the idea of having him evaluated and they're insisting this is more a "laziness" issue than ADD.

How do you make that leap in deciding?
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BrisketBoss




 
 
 
 

Post Thu, Oct 27 2022, 1:05 pm
amother Saddlebrown wrote:
Hope I'm not hijacking, but I have a similar question

My DS is having a hard time now that he's in high school. I've mentioned to his rebbe and principal the idea of having him evaluated and they're insisting this is more a "laziness" issue than ADD.

How do you make that leap in deciding?


First of all, there's no such thing as pure laziness. If the kid isn't meeting expectations it's because SOMETHING is holding them back.
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ora_43




 
 
 
 

Post Thu, Oct 27 2022, 1:58 pm
Ways ADHD looks different from laziness:

First is the obvious, people with ADHD often work very hard, it's just that effort doesn't always lead to results in the same way.

Examples: a kid might clean their room for an hour, but it still looks messy, because they got hyperfocused on organizing a particular drawer, took everything out of the drawer, and then forgot to put it back. A kid might sit in front of an open textbook for an hour and only finish one problem. An adult with ADHD might have taken 40 college courses and still not have a degree, because they've switched majors twice.

The effort is going in, even if results aren't coming out. Whereas with laziness it's the opposite - if any effort is made, it's made in the most efficient way, in order to do as little work as possible.

Second, people with ADHD might fail to do things that seem super easy.

Like, a lazy person isn't going to work a full shift and then forget to file their hours so they can get paid. A person with ADHD might. A lazy child won't read an entire book, write 80% of a book report, and then simply not finish it and turn it in. A kid with ADHD might.

People with ADHD struggle with easy tasks with a high reward, not just the stuff that takes hard work.

Third, people with ADHD are highly motivated in the right circumstances.

Particularly, they tend to be motivated by things that are new and different and by things that are more hands-on. Robotics lecture, no, building your own robot out of lego, yes.

If your kid is bored to tears in regular classes but super excited to visit a historic site and learn all about it, or if they start off strong with each new school year/ semester/ topic but then their grades drop over time - that's a sign of ADHD, not laziness.

*

That's not a comprehensive list but those are some common things you could look for.
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amother




OP
 

Post Thu, Oct 27 2022, 2:04 pm
I'm gaining so much clarity here. Thanks a lot for your responses.

I'm in Monsey. Any recommendation?
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