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ISO new recipes using eggplant, soft tomatoes

 
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seeker




 
 
 
 

Post Fri, Nov 25 2022, 1:09 pm
Need 2 recipes (unless there's something that's 2 in 1 but I think I'm more interested in 2)

1. One medium sized eggplant. We already have babaganoush, I want to do something different like frying. I know I've had delicious salatim with fried (or is it roasted? But not the smoky babaganoush type) eggplant but not sure where and what was in them.

2. Several overripe stem tomatoes. We already have the "Jewish" tomato dip that comes from the store that's basically blended tomatoes with garlic. I'm looking for something different.

edited to make title more helpful. Also open to ideas for green squash, I already have recipes I like but also open to ideas and we have quite a lot of squash right now.
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ra_mom




 
 
 
 

Post Fri, Nov 25 2022, 1:47 pm
Fried eggplant is delish. Can add some red pepper or chunks of tomato. See Mrs. Bissli's recipe.
https://www.imamother.com/foru.....45867


Last edited by ra_mom on Fri, Nov 25 2022, 2:00 pm; edited 1 time in total
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Amarante




 
 
 
 

Post Fri, Nov 25 2022, 1:47 pm
Is green squash zucchini. I am familiar with yellow squash that is like zucchini but yellow.
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seeker




 
 
 
 

Post Fri, Nov 25 2022, 1:54 pm
Amarante wrote:
Is green squash zucchini. I am familiar with yellow squash that is like zucchini but yellow.

It's basically like zucchini but much larger so the texture is a little different and the flavor is milder I think? And also there's less skin-to-middle ratio, which doesn't matter if you're peeling it but for example in recipes that call for cutting it into sticks the green squash falls apart while zucchini stays stick-shaped.
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seeker




 
 
 
 

Post Fri, Nov 25 2022, 1:54 pm
ra_mom wrote:
Fried eggplant is delish. Can add some red pepper or chunks of tomato.
https://www.imamother.com/foru.....45867

Thanks! That link has like 5 recipes... any specific one you recommend?
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mha3484




 
 
 
 

Post Fri, Nov 25 2022, 1:56 pm
This is delicious https://smittenkitchen.com/200.....-mint
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ra_mom




 
 
 
 

Post Fri, Nov 25 2022, 1:58 pm
Sautéed Zucchini

2 Tbsp olive oil
1 onion, diced
2 zucchini, thinly sliced
2 garlic cloves, crushed
1/2 tsp dried oregano (optional)
3/4 tsp salt
1/4 tsp pepper

Heat the oil in a large skillet over medium heat.
Add onion and sauté 2 minutes.
Add zucchini, garlic, oregano, salt and pepper, and sauté for 3 minutes.
Reduce heat to low, cover and cook for 10 minutes. Serve immediately. (Or undercook and serve later.)

You can add diced tomato during the last minute if you'd like.
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ra_mom




 
 
 
 

Post Fri, Nov 25 2022, 2:01 pm
seeker wrote:
Thanks! That link has like 5 recipes... any specific one you recommend?


Mrs Bissli's fried aubergine recipe (eggplant).

* Peel aubergine partially in stripes. Slice in 1.5" thickness, then halve or quarter depending on the size.
Sprinkle 1tbsp salt over the aubergine, leave for 20-30min and rinse away brownish liquid and remaining salt. Pat dry well with paper towels.
* Heat 1tbsp oil till very hot. Add aubergine. Optinally add chopped garlic and chopped onion. Sprinkle a bit more salt, fry till cooked thorough (aubergine will lose spongey texture and turn a bit browinish).
* Serve warm or room temp. This makes a great sabich sandwich in a pita with sliced hard boiled eggs, hummous, chopped israeli salad and amba.
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seeker




 
 
 
 

Post Fri, Nov 25 2022, 2:30 pm
OK, looks doable, thanks!
Would love to do sabich sometime but right now I think I'm just going to serve alongside challah on Shabbos.
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Amarante




 
 
 
 

Post Fri, Nov 25 2022, 3:13 pm
seeker wrote:
It's basically like zucchini but much larger so the texture is a little different and the flavor is milder I think? And also there's less skin-to-middle ratio, which doesn't matter if you're peeling it but for example in recipes that call for cutting it into sticks the green squash falls apart while zucchini stays stick-shaped.


Thank you. I don’t think I am familiar with this squash. I can’t picture it.

If you have time, take a look at these pictures and let me know if any of these are the squash you are describing.

https://www.butter-n-thyme.com.....uash/
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seeker




 
 
 
 

Post Fri, Nov 25 2022, 3:24 pm
Wow, that's a lot of squashes! I think they're just overgrown zucchinis.
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mamaleh




 
 
 
 

Post Fri, Nov 25 2022, 3:28 pm
I always heard/thought that zucchini & green squash were the same thing. In general smaller zucchini (and other types of squash) will have thinner skin and a more delicate flavor. Some stores sell the smaller zucchini separately (for more money) for that reason.
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Amarante




 
 
 
 

Post Fri, Nov 25 2022, 4:47 pm
I didn't use all of that olive oil but eggplant does soak up olive oil and the oil gives it a wonderful unctuous texture. Hasiba was a kosher restaurant in the Pico area which closed earlier this year

Hasiba’s Honeyed Marinated Eggplant

45 minutes
Yields Serves 8 to 10

Chefs Or Amsalam and Alexander Phaneuf of cult hummus joint Hasiba serve a must-order marinated eggplant that you can now make at home. Their recipe combines silky texture, puckery tartness and richness courtesy of olive oil in every bite.

2 large Italian eggplants (about 2 ¾ pounds)
Fine sea salt
1 ½ cups extra-virgin olive oil, plus more
2 medium shallots, thinly sliced
2 medium garlic cloves, roughly chopped
1 ½ teaspoons sweet paprika
⅓ cup balsamic vinegar
⅓ cup sherry or red wine vinegar
3 thyme sprigs
2 tablespoons raw honey, plus more to taste
Juice of 1 large lemon
¼ cup flat-leaf parsley, chopped
1 ½ teaspoons toasted sesame seeds

Trim 1 inch off the top and bottom of each eggplant. Halve each eggplant crosswise, then stand each half on one end and cut each into 8 wedges, for 32 pieces total. Toss the wedges with 1 tablespoon salt in a large bowl, then arrange them with one cut side down on a paper towel-lined baking sheet. Drain for 2 to 4 hours. Pat the eggplant dry with paper towels.


Heat a heavy-bottomed large skillet over medium-high heat. Add half cup olive oil, then arrange half the eggplant with one cut side down until the bottoms are golden brown, 5 to 6 minutes. Add an additional quarter cup oil, flip the eggplant and fry until the other side is golden brown, about 6 minutes more. Transfer to a plate to cool and repeat with the remaining eggplant and an additional three-quarters cup olive oil.


Reduce the heat to medium-low and pour any oil left in the pan into a bowl. Return 2 tablespoons oil to the skillet, or add more fresh oil to make 2 tablespoons. Add the shallots and cook, stirring, until translucent, 2 to 3 minutes. Add the garlic and paprika and sprinkle with salt. Cook, stirring, until fragrant and caramelized, about 2 minutes. Add both vinegars, the thyme and 2 tablespoons water. Swirl the liquids and scrape any browned bits from the pan. Raise the heat to medium-high and cook until the liquid is reduced by half, 5 to 6 minutes.


Remove from the heat and stir in the honey. Add the eggplant and gently stir to coat. Reduce the heat to medium-low and cook until the eggplant softens but is not mushy, about 5 minutes. Cover and cook until the eggplant softens further and one-eighth inch of liquid remains in the skillet, about 5 minutes more. Taste and add more honey and salt, if desired.


Transfer to a nonreactive bowl and cool to room temperature, about 30 minutes. Cover with plastic wrap, transfer to the refrigerator and chill completely, at least 4 hours and up to 5 days.

When ready to serve, remove the eggplant from the refrigerator and let come to room temperature. Remove and discard the thyme sprigs. Stir in the lemon juice, then garnish with the parsley and sesame seeds.

Make Ahead: The eggplant can be refrigerated tightly covered for up to 5 days.
Recipe from Alexander Phaneuf, adapted by Adeena Sussman
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seeker




 
 
 
 

Post Sat, Nov 26 2022, 6:42 pm
K I'm drooling but that's a lot of instructions to read and follow!

Basically all recipes wanted eggplant drained and dried first so I gave up on having something for Shabbos. Think it'll last in the fridge until next thurs/Fri or should I just make something to eat now?
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Amarante




 
 
 
 

Post Sat, Nov 26 2022, 8:37 pm
seeker wrote:
K I'm drooling but that's a lot of instructions to read and follow!

Basically all recipes wanted eggplant drained and dried first so I gave up on having something for Shabbos. Think it'll last in the fridge until next thurs/Fri or should I just make something to eat now?


The recipe only seems complicated because the directions are very explicit but it is actually quite a simple recipe.

You need to salt and drain eggplant because Italian Globe eggplants have a bitter liquid and if you salt it the bitter stuff drains out. It also softens the eggplant and results in the creamy texture of a good eggplant dish. If you don't have time all at one there is no reason you can't do this step the night before and just wash the salt off when done and refrigerate. I usually put the eggplant in a colander over the sink with a plate on top with a can to weigh it down and then the liquid drains in to the sink and I just rinse the eggplant when done in the colander and dry.

You cut the eggplant in half and then make 8 wedges of each half

You saute the eggplant in oil and take it out

You then saute the onions and rest of ingredients and the add back the eggplant and cook until it has all melded together and the eggplant is soft

You then put in a bowl and refrigerate for up to 5 days - You shouldn't eat at once anyway as the flavors have to marry

Very basic recipe Smile

ETA - Also this is the standard sequence for every braised dish - You saute the protein or main vegetable (I.e chicken, brisket, eggplant) and then remove it. You then saute the aromatics (onion, garlic, red pepper if used and then add the spices and herbs and cook for a bit until the onion is soft. YOu add back the chicken, meat, vegetables and then the liquid and let it simmer until it is cooked
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