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Bad financial state? No work qualifications?

 
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amother






Post  Wed, Jun 17 2009, 11:44 am
If you're currently in a bad financial situation, is it in part because you and/or your husband didnt complete post high school training for a field, as in have no degree or certification for some sort of technical training like plumbing or computers or whatever?

If that is the case, do you plan on expanding your income potential by one of you going to learn a field, even though you're married?
Do you plan on raising your kids to also not earn any qualifications, or do you want to give them a better start financially?

My husband and I both don't have any post high school training for any field and are stuck with really minimum wage type jobs. We didnt get degrees because we didnt believe in holding off marriage in order to get a degree, or to be on BC until degrees are finished, and didnt have someone to support us through school and needed the income from working.
I still believe those things I just mentioned, but seeing how we're struggling financially and not moving forward, I don't know if I want my kids to do the same, even if hashkafically I still believe in the same. However, I don't know how to make such a thing work- if we don't delay marriage until after receiving a degree/formal job training of a different kind, and don't hold of birth control for college, and my husband and I definitely won't be able to support them through school either.
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amother






Post  Wed, Jun 17 2009, 11:54 am
I live in Israel.

My husband did not finish high school, and makes a nice living.
I finished high school, went to some college but got married half way through.
I then took a 6 month course in a field that I do not currently work in.

I think that I too make a nice living by Israeli standards.

My mother went to years and years of school, and worked in her profession for 40 years.
My father dropped out of high school, and made a very very VERY nice living in later years. He did not own his own business, but got an entry level position, and was running the entire company within the year. Both my father and myself have been consistently promoted by proving ourselves, performance-wise, rather then by degrees. I would say this applies to my husband as well.

I plan on leaving this decision up to my children when the time comes. I want my children to be happy and frum whether they decide to sit in Kollel or college.
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amother






Post  Wed, Jun 17 2009, 11:57 am
Last amother, what type of field do you and your husband work in that you can make decent money without any qualifications? Sales? Because that is the only thing I've seen make decent money without training, but not everyone is cut out for sales.
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amother






Post  Wed, Jun 17 2009, 12:21 pm
amother wrote:
Last amother, what type of field do you and your husband work in that you can make decent money without any qualifications? Sales? Because that is the only thing I've seen make decent money without training, but not everyone is cut out for sales.




I don't want to give myself away so I'll try to give as little information as possible.
It's not sales. I tried sales for a time at IDT and I was both bad at it, and hated it. If someone wasn't interested I'd hang up instead of convincing them. Plus, if they were rude, I'd take it very personally. Obviously sales was not for me.

I work for the insurance industry. I work from home and it's an American company.
My husband is in the...um... yeshiva/teaching/kiruv type industry.

I strongly disagree with the statement that only sales can make decent money. Maybe I'm mistaken. Like I said, I think promotions and raises have more to do with proven ability, then the certificate on the wall. (Though I'm not minimizing the fact that you have to first be able to GET hired.)
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gryp




 
 
 


Post  Wed, Jun 17 2009, 12:29 pm
Some employers are willing to train on the job.
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amother






Post  Wed, Jun 17 2009, 12:34 pm
amother wrote:

I strongly disagree with the statement that only sales can make decent money. Maybe I'm mistaken. Like I said, I think promotions and raises have more to do with proven ability, then the certificate on the wall. (Though I'm not minimizing the fact that you have to first be able to GET hired.)
Maybe. I don't know. The field my husband is in (not sales), no one gets promotions. Everyone gets the same amount of money per hour. The only way to earn more money is to work more hours.
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amother






Post  Wed, Jun 17 2009, 12:40 pm
GR wrote:
Some employers are willing to train on the job.
Can you give examples of types of jobs that are willing to train on the job, that are not sales, and that make more than minimum wage?
If you don't need experience in the field nor formal training prior to taking the job, what types of things do they look for when hiring people for these types of jobs?
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gryp




 
 
 


Post  Wed, Jun 17 2009, 12:45 pm
I can't say I've noticed any particular job category. Many times when I read job postings I see it says "willing to train." Two people I know who were trained on the job, one was doing computer work at a very busy office, and the other was in a real estate office but it wasn't a sales-type job.

It seems to me they just want someone dedicated and committed to staying with them for a long time.
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amother






Post  Wed, Jun 17 2009, 12:55 pm
I am working in the "um kiruv industry" while dh is in school. Maybe when he finishes I will go back or more like start, but right now we cannot handle the two of us in school financially. We have kids and no financial support from family. I was reading this thread and thought, nah, I won't post, but thought about it again and decided that if there are others who can benefit it would be worth it. Dh is now in a community college going for certificate in accounting. His long-term dream is tax law (which would mean getting his certificate, cpa, and then going to law school), but right now we are thinking realistically. The community college courses cost us nothing, since are eligible for financial aid that covers tuition completely (aka no student loans!!). He is a super-hard worker and gets good grades, so hopefully he'll be able to get a decent scholarship to be able to advance to a better college than the community one he's in. He's in school part-time (really difficult hours, if I may add!) while he tutors on the side. If you think you may be eligible for help financially, find out if you can take courses. It will definitely help your job options and give you a better shot at a higher salary.
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nicole81




 
 
 


Post  Wed, Jun 17 2009, 5:09 pm
op- if you can get your typing skills up, than you can get a decent paying secretarial job.

we're pretty fortunate that dh started working with a young company when he was 18, and as the company has grown in the past 10 years, his position and salary has grown nicely along with it.

even though I know it's difficult to get a degree once you're married and have kids, it's by no means impossible. I worked 50 hours a week while going to school at night, through 2 pregnancies and with newborns at home. I remember coming into school 6 days postpartum to take a midterm! it took me a very long time to get my degree but I did it. I have a stable and pretty well paying job b"h and am more than halfway through my master's degree now (which is also done at night.) it was definitely worth the early struggles.

in terms of my children, well, I wouldn't want them to work as hard as I did. I would prefer if they completed college before they got married. IMO, 18-20 is too early to get married anyway. but we'll cross that bridge when we get there!
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amother






Post  Thu, Jun 18 2009, 11:34 am
nicole81 wrote:
op- if you can get your typing skills up, than you can get a decent paying secretarial job.
Here, anyhow, secretarial jobs make BOBKES! Think 1000 dollars a month for working full time. I make more than that working part time.
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amother






Post  Thu, Jun 18 2009, 11:43 am
amother wrote:
nicole81 wrote:
op- if you can get your typing skills up, than you can get a decent paying secretarial job.
Here, anyhow, secretarial jobs make BOBKES! Think 1000 dollars a month for working full time. I make more than that working part time.



Where is here?
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nicole81




 
 
 


Post  Thu, Jun 18 2009, 12:02 pm
amother wrote:
nicole81 wrote:
op- if you can get your typing skills up, then you can get a decent paying secretarial job.
Here, anyhow, secretarial jobs make BOBKES! Think 1000 dollars a month for working full time. I make more than that working part time.


maybe. I'm thinking in terms of NYC. I have known people with no education, but typing and people skills, to get entry level secretarial jobs that pay decently in brooklyn, but even more in manhattan. plus these jobs come with health benefits as well.
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amother






Post  Thu, Jun 18 2009, 1:46 pm
amother wrote:
amother wrote:
nicole81 wrote:
op- if you can get your typing skills up, than you can get a decent paying secretarial job.
Here, anyhow, secretarial jobs make BOBKES! Think 1000 dollars a month for working full time. I make more than that working part time.



Where is here?
I would rather not say.
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He*Sings*To*Me




 
 
 


Post  Mon, Jun 29 2009, 6:30 pm
My dh and I are both college educated with advanced degrees. I was 34, almost 35, when we married. My bashert is 9.5 years older than I am. I worked all the way through my first pregnancy (I was at a desk), took 8 weeks maternity leave, and stayed there until the day before my baby was 9 months old. I've been a SAHM ever since.
College degrees do NOT guarantee job security. You can be downsized in the corporate world so easily, as was my DH and find yourself surviving frugally on your retirement accounts, as we did for months until my DH found parnossah, and we were back on top again, but having to start over as far as saving for old age.

I think it all depends on what your aptitudes are, as an individual.
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amother






Post  Mon, Jun 29 2009, 7:05 pm
DH has no advanced degree. Just a yeshiva HS diploma. He manages real estate and is learning how to go into it on his own. He makes a very decent salary. I still have to work because he doesn't get health benefits and he doesn't work full hours because he learns part of the time.
At one point, before we were married, he was working as an assistant to an electrician. He didn't want to go to school because he didn't want to 'apprentice' under someone licensed for the required amount of time. There was no one jewish in the area to do it with and he didn't want to hang out all day with someone else. so he let it go. I'm sure he'd be making a lot more money as an electrician. But it is probably better the way we are.
He is learning the ropes of how to run his own management properties and is getting started on his own. I'm hoping it will take off.
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