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Can I save it for next year?
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amother




Crimson


Post  Wed, Apr 19 2017, 9:47 am
I have a closed box of macaroons with no expiry date. Can I save it for next year?
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Iymnok









  


Post  Wed, Apr 19 2017, 9:49 am
No! Send them to me!
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Squishy









  


Post  Wed, Apr 19 2017, 9:51 am
Can you save Pesach vinegar?
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rdmom









  


Post  Wed, Apr 19 2017, 10:16 am
I have lots of leftover nosh that no one will touch in my house. And some cake too.

I davka buy extra matza and potato starch. We eat matZa on shabbos year round and hubby loves chicken cutlets with potato starch instead of corn flake crumbs.

But what to do with all this nosh?
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Squishy









  


Post  Wed, Apr 19 2017, 10:19 am
rdmom wrote:
I have lots of leftover nosh that no one will touch in my house. And some cake too.

I davka buy extra matza and potato starch. We eat matZa on shabbos year round and hubby loves chicken cutlets with potato starch instead of corn flake crumbs.

But what to do with all this nosh?


Give it to someone with celiac or give it to a boys yeshiva. LOL - they eat everything it seems.
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water_bear88









  


Post  Wed, Apr 19 2017, 10:31 am
Squishy wrote:
Can you save Pesach vinegar?


Check the expiration date, but probably as vinegar is itself a preservative.
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Eemaof3









  


Post  Wed, Apr 19 2017, 11:25 am
Thanks for the vinegar advice. I hate having multiple bottles open and it is so expensive!
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Squishy









  


Post  Wed, Apr 19 2017, 11:30 am
water_bear88 wrote:
Check the expiration date, but probably as vinegar is itself a preservative.


It's Pesach vinegar and has the words imitation vinegar on the label. The ingredients list consists of acedic acid and water - the same as regular vinegar.

I am so confused.
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water_bear88









  


Post  Wed, Apr 19 2017, 11:31 am
Eemaof3 wrote:
Thanks for the vinegar advice. I hate having multiple bottles open and it is so expensive!


I read something by the OU that said vinegar in the US is mostly from corn (kitniyot) while in Israel it's mainly from citrus. I don't suppose any of the stores catering to Israelis bother importing Osem vinegar. Confused
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water_bear88









  


Post  Wed, Apr 19 2017, 11:53 am
Squishy wrote:
It's Pesach vinegar and has the words imitation vinegar on the label. The ingredients list consists of acedic acid and water - the same as regular vinegar.

I am so confused.


I'll try to explain- I roll my eyes in general at products that say "no preservatives" when they clearly contain large amounts of sugar, salt, or vinegar- those 3 foods being natural preservatives. E.g. pickles- they don't necessarily ave artificial preservatives, but there's no way they don't contain large amounts of either vinegar or salt.

Some other foods just naturally have long shelf lives if stored properly- wine can be good for decades or more, and honey literally never goes bad. I actually read an article a while ago about scientists tasting some they'd found in an ancient Egyptian tomb.

So as to vinegar, if it can extend the shelf life of cucumbers from days/weeks to months/years, I'd trust it on its own for at least 2 years from manufacturing- and if you look it up my guess is it's good for a lot longer than that.

(Acetic acid is just the chemical that makes vinegar vinegar and not something else. It's always diluted when you buy it, year-round- usually with water though I checked the balsamic vinegar I have and it's diluted with grape juice instead.)
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amother




Firebrick


Post  Wed, Apr 19 2017, 12:04 pm
What about baking powder?
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water_bear88









  


Post  Wed, Apr 19 2017, 12:17 pm
amother wrote:
What about baking powder?


Probably not good for more than a year or two- check the expiration date. It reacts with itself in baking and does the same (though much more slowly) at room temperature. If you do try to use it after a while when it's all self-reacted already, it probably won't make your cakes taste funny but it won't make them rise, either.
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Iymnok









  


Post  Wed, Apr 19 2017, 12:17 pm
Real Balsamic vinegar is made from wine. When wine is allowed to go off it becomes vinegar. Obviously if done right. I guess a cheap imitation would just be grape juice added.

I've kept baking powder for a few years. Then I realized I never use it for pesach.
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water_bear88









  


Post  Wed, Apr 19 2017, 12:27 pm
Iymnok wrote:
Real Balsamic vinegar is made from wine. When wine is allowed to go off it becomes vinegar. Obviously if done right. I guess a cheap imitation would just be grape juice added.

I've kept baking powder for a few years. Then I realized I never use it for pesach.


It's the stuff that's under 30 shekels a bottle. We use it too often to splurge on the fancier ones.

That said, the ingredient list translates to wine vinegar, concentrated grape juice, cooked grape juice, caramel coloring. So there is real balsamic vinegar in there, it's just diluted with cheaper ingredients.
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Squishy









  


Post  Wed, Apr 19 2017, 12:51 pm
water_bear88 wrote:
I read something by the OU that said vinegar in the US is mostly from corn (kitniyot) while in Israel it's mainly from citrus. I don't suppose any of the stores catering to Israelis bother importing Osem vinegar. Confused


Thanks. I think that explains it. I appreciate you taking your time.

I still don't understand why it is labeled imitation though. Explaining it is citris based rather than corn based on the label would make it more appealing to use.

As it is, I hate using "imitation" foods.

Do you know about mustard? What makes it "imitation"? I am no where near the label to check.
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sky









  


Post  Wed, Apr 19 2017, 12:57 pm
Mustard seed is kitniyos.

My DH bought mustard this year and I found it especially disgusting, more so then in the past. It was very mayonnaisy.
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water_bear88









  


Post  Wed, Apr 19 2017, 1:18 pm
As sky said, mustard seed itself is kitniyot so who knows what they put in the fake stuff. We live without it for the week- maybe I'll buy a bottle next time for use while we're still turning over and eating a lot of kitniyot.

Synthetic vinegar just means they made the acetic acid in a lab rather than the traditional fermenting it from alcohol which in turn is fermented from something else (which can be chametz, kitniyot, or KLP). I get being concerned about traces of other chemicals, though. Btw, two other common acids to find on ingredient labels- citric acid is naturally found in all citrus fruits and I think your body also makes it; ascorbic acid is vitamin C. None of those 3 is inherently worrisome as an ingredient.

I realized I only bought balsamic for Pesach and the one I'd put away for Pesach doesn't have a KLP hechsher, but a lot of that is to do with the cost of various hechshers AFAIK. I'll have to check next year if there's a difference in the ingredients.
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zaq









  


Post  Wed, Apr 19 2017, 3:45 pm
Squishy wrote:
Can you save Pesach vinegar?

Absolutely. Vinegar is a preservative and doesn't spoil.
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myself









  


Post  Wed, Apr 19 2017, 3:53 pm
zaq wrote:
Absolutely. Vinegar is a preservative and doesn't spoil.


I actually just checked my vinegar and it expires before Pesach next year. Despite the fact that it was purchased just before this Pesach.
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zaq









  


Post  Wed, Apr 19 2017, 4:11 pm
Squishy wrote:
It's Pesach vinegar and has the words imitation vinegar on the label. The ingredients list consists of acedic acid and water - the same as regular vinegar.

I am so confused.


They call it imitation vinegar so you know it wasn't made from fermentation of grain. Acetic acid is the acid component of vinegar and can be made by fermenting anything starchy or sugary--e.g. apple juice, grape juice, grain, or wine. If you ferment grape juice just right you get wine as the sugar is converted to alcohol. Let it go too long and you get wine vinegar as the alcohol is converted to acetic acid. Ferment apple juice just right and get hard cider. Wait too long and get cider vinegar. Ditto for grain alcohol, or alcohol made from potatoes, fruit, etc.

On Pesach you want to be sure your vinegar didn't start out as wheat, barley, rye, etc. Your imitation vinegar is chemically identical to vinegar that started life as a sheaf of wheat or a hill of potatoes but probably started life as ethyl alcohol derived from petroleum.

Vinegar is simply acetic acid diluted with water to about 5% acidity, regardless of what fruit or vegetable was used to produce it. There is probably a law that states that only acetic acid derived from edible material can be called vinegar and anything derived from petrochemicals must be called imitation. I'm guessing about this but I'll bet you a bar of Schmerling chocolate it's so.
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