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Asking for Raise Advice - Long

 
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amother




Ecru


Post  Thu, Jan 11 2018, 1:23 pm
I started a new job a year ago.
They knew in advance through the recruiter what the lowest salary offer I would consider was. When we discussed salary, I requested 5k more. They told me that they had originally budgeted less for my position, but they could go up to the number the recruiter had said. I asked about other benefits, and when I was offered the position, I accepted the salary they offered. I didn't have a lot of confidence, so I didn't want to push it, because the job seemed like a good fit. I also wanted to prove myself. When I was hired, I was told there was room for growth (not necessarily in terms of my position(as in changing job title), but that I can take on projects that will be mine, if I master the basics of the position.) BH, I have really done well. I know I do more than the employee I took over, and I also took on a bigger specific project that I manage and I do quick small projects that need to get done all the time. I know they are happy with me BH.

Here's my question- when I go for my yearly review, can I ask for 5k more? Can I ask for more than that? I didn't end up taking health insurance from them, because it wasn't worth it (and I was counting on it). Also, I have a lot more confidence in my abilities now. Is asking 5-10k raise too much? I also need to factor in that they will probably counter offer, so should I ask for more than I want?
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Cookiegirl









  


Post  Thu, Jan 11 2018, 1:29 pm
Raises are often budgeted and given as a percentage of current salary. It is hard to say whether asking for a $5K or $10K raise is realistic without knowing your job, your current salary, and what your company typically budgets for raises. I.e. if $5K represents a 10% raise, but the company budgets 3% then they may not have room to give you the raise you want. The strategy there would be to see whether you can change your job title/description and move into a higher salary band where they could meet your salary requirements.
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Cookiegirl









  


Post  Thu, Jan 11 2018, 1:32 pm
Note that you can try to assess what the company is saving by not providing you with health insurance, and try to get some of that as compensation- that can be a substantial number. (However, that does not always translate into an equivalent salary boost- they may factor in that a certain percentage of employees don't participate in the plan, so there really isn't any "savings" on their part).
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momX4









  


Post  Thu, Jan 11 2018, 4:25 pm
Clarify your job title. Make sure it reflects what you actually do.

Do your research. What is the average salary for this job title in your neighborhood.

Start from there.
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amother




Ecru


Post  Thu, Jan 11 2018, 5:00 pm
Cookiegirl wrote:
Raises are often budgeted and given as a percentage of current salary. It is hard to say whether asking for a $5K or $10K raise is realistic without knowing your job, your current salary, and what your company typically budgets for raises. I.e. if $5K represents a 10% raise, but the company budgets 3% then they may not have room to give you the raise you want. The strategy there would be to see whether you can change your job title/description and move into a higher salary band where they could meet your salary requirements.

Thank u for responding cookie girl!
5k is in the range of 10%...
I don't want to post what I do because not many ppl do it.(at least not that I know of). Changing my job title would not be a good thing. It's a good title. I like my job and my title and what I do. I was told when I started that there is room for growth. In my current role. No need to change. I just started so I honestly don't think I'm anywhere near the "cap" as long as I prove valuable enough. (That the drift I get)
I've been getting positive feedback about my performance. I don't think THEY would be happy if I wanted to change positions. Im good where I'm at.
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amother




Ecru


Post  Thu, Jan 11 2018, 5:05 pm
Cookiegirl wrote:
Note that you can try to assess what the company is saving by not providing you with health insurance, and try to get some of that as compensation- that can be a substantial number. (However, that does not always translate into an equivalent salary boost- they may factor in that a certain percentage of employees don't participate in the plan, so there really isn't any "savings" on their part).

It's easily 5k. And I was relying on having part of my health insurance covered.. which is why I was ok with less.
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Cookiegirl









  


Post  Thu, Jan 11 2018, 5:05 pm
If you think you are in a good position, and you strongly believe they have the money to give, then be assertive. It is always good to go into an annual review with a list of your "above and beyond my job description accomplishments," which can justify a larger than normal raise, along with the health insurance chip. And, as MomX4 said, definitely do your research (even if it is not a common job- find something close and see how that is compensated in your area). Good luck!
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amother




Ivory


Post  Thu, Jan 11 2018, 5:08 pm
It’s hard to know without knowing your position but I’m pretty sure it may be a legal requirement to offer health insurance benefits to employees after a certain time frame (don’t quote me-do your reaearch). Besides 5k sounds very reasonable if you believe you are truly an asset to the company. If you have a college degree and are working in that particular field, even more.
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amother




Ecru


Post  Thu, Jan 11 2018, 5:09 pm
momX4 wrote:
Clarify your job title. Make sure it reflects what you actually do.

Do your research. What is the average salary for this job title in your neighborhood.

Start from there.


My job title is specific. Amd it reflects exactly what I do. (It covers a pretty wide range)

When I Google my title + city + salary, I'm actually paid on the lower end. (Just below the lower end actually)
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amother




Ecru


Post  Thu, Jan 11 2018, 5:13 pm
Cookiegirl wrote:
If you think you are in a good position, and you strongly believe they have the money to give, then be assertive. It is always good to go into an annual review with a list of your "above and beyond my job description accomplishments," which can justify a larger than normal raise, along with the health insurance chip. And, as MomX4 said, definitely do your research (even if it is not a common job- find something close and see how that is compensated in your area). Good luck!


It's a common job, I just don't really know any frum Jewish women doing it ..
I googled job title + city+ salary and I'm being paid on the lower end. Does that justify me asking for a >10% raise?

Should I just stick to the 10%? What if they counter offer.. then I'll feel like I should have asked for more...
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amother




Ecru


Post  Thu, Jan 11 2018, 5:16 pm
amother wrote:
It’s hard to know without knowing your position but I’m pretty sure it may be a legal requirement to offer health insurance benefits to employees after a certain time frame (don’t quote me-do your reaearch). Besides 5k sounds very reasonable if you believe you are truly an asset to the company. If you have a college degree and are working in that particular field, even more.


They do offer health insurance.. its not a small company so yes they are required to offer it. However, it wasn't worth it for me so I didn't end up taking it from them. Should I ask for a bit more than 5 because they will probably counter offer?
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Squishy









  


Post  Thu, Jan 11 2018, 5:18 pm
What about asking for $200 more a week instead?
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Cookiegirl









  


Post  Thu, Jan 11 2018, 5:25 pm
If you are at the lower end, or under the range that is typical in your area, then you should ask for more than the amount that gets you to the bottom of the range plus a few thousand dollars to reflect your year of experience (that can be more than $5K at this point, but I don't have all the numbers). You can't really control whether or not they counter, but you need to be prepared to take a lower number than you really want if you want to keep the job. I can tell you that as a "boss" who takes care of raises, if I make a counter offer it is generally not governed by how much a person asks for, but rather how much money I have in my raise pool and how much I am willing to absorb on any given person. You may ask for $5K and get a counter of $3K, but you could get the same counter offer if you ask for $7K, if all they have earmarked for you is $3K. Raise negotiations are not the same as getting a counter offer at the start of a job, or if you threaten to leave because you got a better offer elsewhere (which is really where a counter offer is most relevant).
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amother




Ecru


Post  Thu, Jan 11 2018, 5:31 pm
Squishy wrote:
What about asking for $200 more a week instead?


I'm not paid by the week.. I'm a salaried employee and it goes by the year..
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amother




Ecru


Post  Thu, Jan 11 2018, 5:37 pm
Cookiegirl wrote:
If you are at the lower end, or under the range that is typical in your area, then you should ask for more than the amount that gets you to the bottom of the range plus a few thousand dollars to reflect your year of experience (that can be more than $5K at this point, but I don't have all the numbers). You can't really control whether or not they counter, but you need to be prepared to take a lower number than you really want if you want to keep the job. I can tell you that as a "boss" who takes care of raises, if I make a counter offer it is generally not governed by how much a person asks for, but rather how much money I have in my raise pool and how much I am willing to absorb on any given person. You may ask for $5K and get a counter of $3K, but you could get the same counter offer if you ask for $7K, if all they have earmarked for you is $3K. Raise negotiations are not the same as getting a counter offer at the start of a job, or if you threaten to leave because you got a better offer elsewhere (which is really where a counter offer is most relevant).


Thank You so much for taking the time to answer cookie girl!!! I guess I'm just making sure that it makes sense to ask for so much when a year ago I was ok with way less. (Again, only because of self esteem issues. This job has done wonders for that, BH)

I think 7k Makes sense, I just don't want to be laughed out of the building Smile.

Would it be ok to pm u if I decide to un-amother myself? (I'm not sure the rules of pm)

Again, thanks so much for your help.
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Squishy









  


Post  Thu, Jan 11 2018, 5:39 pm
amother wrote:
I'm not paid by the week.. I'm a salaried employee and it goes by the year..


How often do you get your check?

It is much easier for owners to digest the smaller number. A weekly or biweekly or monthly increase doesn't sound as bad as$10,000 a year.
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amother




Ivory


Post  Thu, Jan 11 2018, 5:59 pm
If you know your boss will negotiate then ask even higher than what you want and think of An amount you would settle for
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Cookiegirl









  


Post  Thu, Jan 11 2018, 6:55 pm
You are welcome to PM me...my pleasure
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