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Bruschetta for shabbat lunch?

 
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jackberg79









  


Post  Thu, Jan 11 2018, 8:31 pm
I have this cookbook called "bamitbach im hatanach" featuring recipes related to the parsha for each week. For Va'era, riffing on the theme of hailstones of fire and ice, the recipe is a bruschetta-like appetizer (tomatoes=fire, white onion=ice).

Have you ever made bruschetta for shabbat lunch? When do you toast the baguette? Last thing right before shabbat? How do you store it? Open, sealed, frozen until shabbat morning?


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6 tomatoes
1 diced onion
1/2 c vinegar
1/2 tsp pepper
2 Tbsp sugar
a few drops of tabasco or diced hot peppers (opt)
1 baguette cut into thin slices
olive oil

Cut the tomatoes and onion and place in a covered bowl.
Mix the rest of the ingredients (minus bread and oil) over medium heat, until boiling.
Immediately pour the sauce on the vegetables, mix, and cool at least one hour.
Coat the baguette with oil and toast them until brittle.
Put the tomato mixture on the pieces of baguette.


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It also includes a dvar torah on the pasuk that inspires the food:


In Shmot 9:14, God commands Moshe to inform Pharaoh that this time, he's sending ALL his plagues, but then immediately afterwards sends just one single plague: the plague of hail. One commentator explains that in "all my plagues", the intention is really the death of the firstborn. Other commentators explain that it's not speaking of the death of the firstborn but rather the initial plagues that hit produce, which was almost entirely destroyed by the plague of hail. If so, what was so special and distinct with this place, that made it equal to "all" the other plagues?

Some suggest that God referred to this plague with the phrase "all my plagues" because the type of hail that fell created a very loud noise (or a strong wind) and the miraculous combination of fire and ice is a combination of opposite elements. This idea is interesting, in that after this plague we are witness for the first time that Pharaoh reacts in fear, saying in Shmot 9:27, "God is HaTzadik and I and my people are HaR'sha'im"

Another direction explains that this plague is unique in that it is built as a miracle within a miracle: the first and the hail are mixed together. Two opposite elements that created a peace between themselves in order to fulfill the will of their Creator. Additionally, you can see that the first plagues did not induce lasting damage; whereas the plague of hail was the first place that inflicted permanent damage to the ground. This terrible storm damaged the flax and barley (9:31), and afterward the plague of locusts destroyed all the remaining produce in Egypt. The remaining plagues were darkness and death of the firstborn; the plague of hail was the beginning of the end for Pharaoh and Egypt.

(edited to add recipe and dvar torah)


Last edited by jackberg79 on Thu, Jan 11 2018, 8:49 pm; edited 2 times in total
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ra_mom









  


Post  Thu, Jan 11 2018, 8:35 pm
You can store the crostini in an airtight container.
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jackberg79









  


Post  Thu, Jan 11 2018, 8:45 pm
They won't get soggy from the oil?
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ra_mom









  


Post  Thu, Jan 11 2018, 8:50 pm
Don't coat or drizzle the bread slices in oil. Just brush or spray with oil.
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cbg









  


Post  Thu, Jan 11 2018, 9:29 pm
I would toast the bread with no oil.
If you heat the oven, and turn it off, then put the bread slices in the bread will get a nice crunch. You can leave it over night.
Once completely cooled store in a container sealed outside of the fridge.
Then coat a little oil and put the tomatoe sauce on, when you are ready to serve.

That cookbook sounds so cool.
Can you share every week, but by Tuesday so we have time to prepare.
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jackberg79









  


Post  Thu, Jan 11 2018, 9:48 pm
cbg wrote:


That cookbook sounds so cool.
Can you share every week, but by Tuesday so we have time to prepare.



Definitely not! It would take way too long to translate and type up, and it's almost literally gneivat da'at. Buy the book! (from there or wherever else you might find it)
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cbg









  


Post  Thu, Jan 11 2018, 9:52 pm
Do they have a similar book in English
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jackberg79









  


Post  Thu, Jan 11 2018, 9:55 pm
No idea. My friend got it for me in Israel a couple years ago.
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tichellady









  


Post  Thu, Jan 11 2018, 10:20 pm
I would do bruschetta chicken instead or just serve the bruschetta as a dip on bread, but I wouldn’t pretoast crostini
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jackberg79









  


Post  Thu, Jan 11 2018, 10:51 pm
No chicken, the cayenne cookies (more fire!) are dairy!
If the bread totally fails, I will just serve it as a side, similar to Israeli salad without the cukes. That was the backup plan.
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