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Did you ever have this with your baby???

 
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amother




OP
 

Post  Thu, Dec 12 2019, 4:12 pm
My baby is 2 weeks old and has a pus filled blister on his inner thigh, right where the nappy meets the skin. Its a white blister and the skin around it is red and a bit sore looking.

Been to the dr today and he said it should pop in the next day or 2,and then I can apply an antibiotic cream to fight infection, but for now, I should just use a barrier cream.

Anyone ever had this before?

The mohel was slightly concerned as he didnt want it to get anywhere near the bris area, as his bris still needs a bit of aftercare.

Has anyones baby ever had this, and realistically how long did it take to go away?

thanks!

iv been to the dr already 3 times this week for a few issues and just want it to go away asap!
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amother




Purple
 

Post  Thu, Dec 12 2019, 4:14 pm
MRSA is going around. It must be checked before a bris!
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amother




OP
 

Post  Thu, Dec 12 2019, 4:32 pm
whats MRSa? hes had his bris.
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amother




Seafoam
 

Post  Thu, Dec 12 2019, 4:54 pm
My son had this as a newborn. I used bacitracin 3-4 times a day. They came and went on his thighs and abdomen for a while and eventually disappeared.
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amother




OP
 

Post  Thu, Dec 12 2019, 5:03 pm
thanks.
what cream is that?
im in the uk.
and how long does it take to pop?
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amother




Purple
 

Post  Thu, Dec 12 2019, 9:49 pm
amother [ OP ] wrote:
whats MRSa? hes had his bris.

MRSA is a staph infection. It's very serious because it's resistant to antibiotics. It's called a super bug because it's very hard to treat. It's very fast and very catchy and must be taken care of immediately usually with special oral antibiotics in conjunction with cream antibiotics.

"Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a bacterium that causes infections in different parts of the body. It's tougher to treat than most strains of staphylococcus aureus -- or staph -- because it's resistant to some commonly used antibiotics.

The symptoms of MRSA depend on where you're infected. Most often, it causes mild infections on the skin, like sores, boils, or abscesses. But it can also cause more serious skin infections or infect surgical wounds, the bloodstream, the lungs, or the urinary tract.

Staph can usually be treated with antibiotics. But over the decades, some strains of staph -- like MRSA -- have become resistant to antibiotics that once destroyed it. MRSA was first discovered in 1961. It's now resistant to methicillin, amoxicillin, penicillin, oxacillin, and other common antibiotics known as cephalosporins.

While some antibiotics still work, MRSA is constantly adapting. Researchers developing new antibiotics are having a tough time keeping up."
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gold21




 
 
 
 

Post  Thu, Dec 12 2019, 10:01 pm
Bacitracin is not broad spectrum

Try Neosporin

Or even better, Bactrim, which you need a prescription for
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cbsdbs




 
 
 
 

Post  Thu, Dec 12 2019, 10:09 pm
You can try bactroban/mupirocin cream.
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sweet




 
 
 
 

Post  Thu, Dec 12 2019, 10:11 pm
My baby is now a month old and also had this 2 weeks ago.
Firstly, don’t worry , it’s not mrsa!
It’s not related to the bris, my Dr. said it could be from diaper rubbing against his skin, I put on antibiotic cream, it popped and it went away after a few days..
And I haven’t seen it come back thankfully..
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sweet3




 
 
 
 

Post  Thu, Dec 12 2019, 10:41 pm
My baby had them. I put bacitracin and it healed in a few days. Dr said nothing to worry about.
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amother




Seashell
 

Post  Fri, Dec 13 2019, 12:11 am
amother [ Purple ] wrote:
MRSA is a staph infection. It's very serious because it's resistant to antibiotics. It's called a super bug because it's very hard to treat. It's very fast and very catchy and must be taken care of immediately usually with special oral antibiotics in conjunction with cream antibiotics.

"Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a bacterium that causes infections in different parts of the body. It's tougher to treat than most strains of staphylococcus aureus -- or staph -- because it's resistant to some commonly used antibiotics.

The symptoms of MRSA depend on where you're infected. Most often, it causes mild infections on the skin, like sores, boils, or abscesses. But it can also cause more serious skin infections or infect surgical wounds, the bloodstream, the lungs, or the urinary tract.

Staph can usually be treated with antibiotics. But over the decades, some strains of staph -- like MRSA -- have become resistant to antibiotics that once destroyed it. MRSA was first discovered in 1961. It's now resistant to methicillin, amoxicillin, penicillin, oxacillin, and other common antibiotics known as cephalosporins.

While some antibiotics still work, MRSA is constantly adapting. Researchers developing new antibiotics are having a tough time keeping up."


MRSA is just methicillin resistant. There are bacteria that are resistant to more than that. MRSA can be successfully treated with many antibiotics. Does your baby have them anywhere else? I'd want to rule out Herpes since it is extremely dangerous in a child under 2.
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