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How many years are you working for your company
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amother




OP
 

Post  Thu, Jan 16 2020, 12:58 pm
I was at my first job out of college for 9 years. I moved a year and a half ago. I was at a job for 4 months and quit and now I am at my current job for a little over a year. I am 32.
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amother




Tangerine
 

Post  Thu, Jan 16 2020, 1:07 pm
Why do you want to know?
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amother




OP
 

Post  Thu, Jan 16 2020, 1:31 pm
I told a coworker that I was at my old job for 9 years and she was shocked. She said most people jump around more - especially in the beginning. was just curious....
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amother




Wheat
 

Post  Thu, Jan 16 2020, 1:34 pm
15 years - tech
I’d make s lot more $$$ jumping around. But I like my work arrangement. It’s worth more more to me then the money. Problem is my skills become stagnant staying in the same place so long.
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amother




Beige
 

Post  Thu, Jan 16 2020, 1:40 pm
22 years.

Which means I've been working for close to 30. Long than many imothers have been alive.

Retirement is still a loooong way off!
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amother




Tangerine
 

Post  Thu, Jan 16 2020, 1:40 pm
Statistically this is true. Young new hires do tend to skip around, usually looking for a better deal each time, or looking for different communities in which to live, or being unwilling to put up with a work situation that doesn’t suit them to a T. As one matures, one starts to think about things like pensions, insurance, the advantages of seniority within a company, and the inconvenience of moving around all the time. Most pension plans require a person to have worked 5 or 10 years with the firm to be able to draw a pension at retirement.

That doesn’t mean that there’s anything wrong with a young person’s staying put if s/he and the job suit each other. Some employers prefer not to hire people with highly checkered careers—they want to see stability and loyalty, not someone who will stay for a bit, take all the training and mentoring, and then take those skills to a competitor.
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Fave




 
 
 
 

Post  Thu, Jan 16 2020, 1:43 pm
It’s gonna be 17 years in March. I have a very good work setup that suits my family's schedule, which I won’t find elsewhere.

Over the years I worked myself up from an entry level job to a senior position.


Last edited by Fave on Thu, Jan 16 2020, 1:46 pm; edited 1 time in total
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amother




Wheat
 

Post  Thu, Jan 16 2020, 1:45 pm
amother [ Tangerine ] wrote:
Statistically this is true. Young new hires do tend to skip around, usually looking for a better deal each time, or looking for different communities in which to live, or being unwilling to put up with a work situation that doesn’t suit them to a T. As one matures, one starts to think about things like pensions, insurance, the advantages of seniority within a company, and the inconvenience of moving around all the time. Most pension plans require a person to have worked 5 or 10 years with the firm to be able to draw a pension at retirement.

That doesn’t mean that there’s anything wrong with a young person’s staying put if s/he and the job suit each other. Some employers prefer not to hire people with highly checkered careers—they want to see stability and loyalty, not someone who will stay for a bit, take all the training and mentoring, and then take those skills to a competitor.


This is true - I’m fully vested in my 401k. But most companies do not have pensions.
I was given to stock due to my seniority - but I recently discovered that everyone has way more then me :\

But being at a job many years these days no longer guarantees security. And that scares me because I think after being at one job so long it’s harder to find something new.
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bouncy




 
 
 
 

Post  Thu, Jan 16 2020, 1:47 pm
I'm in my 5th year! The best thing to stay in one place- jumping around makes you not a solid worker Laugh
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amother




Beige
 

Post  Thu, Jan 16 2020, 1:48 pm
bouncy wrote:
I'm in my 5th year! The best thing to stay in one place- jumping around makes you not a solid worker Laugh


Not necessarily true. In my industry, it's very common, especially when you're first starting out.

I worked for four different companies in 7 years. And I've been at the 5th for a long time.
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Jewishmom8




 
 
 
 

Post  Thu, Jan 16 2020, 1:50 pm
17 years
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singleagain




 
 
 
 

Post  Thu, Jan 16 2020, 1:50 pm
After a bit of not working due to health issues. I'm very happy for almost two and half years at my job.
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amother




Natural
 

Post  Thu, Jan 16 2020, 1:53 pm
About 9 years.
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amother




Scarlet
 

Post  Thu, Jan 16 2020, 1:58 pm
Twenty-five years Baruch Hashem.
But that's because I was always treated nicely and given appreciation for what I contributed. Bonuses, nice treatment.. Etc..

That's kinda the way you keep an employee if you want her, I imagine. Nobody hassled me if I needed time off, school plays, or sick days..

And the environment was not a toxic one, where so many businesses do have that. (workmates informing on each other to bosses, speaking behind peoples' back, embarrassing people publicly... Freezing people out.. Those are no-nos and big red flags. So are bounced checks and garnished wages..)

So Baruch Hashem I was fortunate.
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amother




Cerise
 

Post  Thu, Jan 16 2020, 2:03 pm
I'm in my first year at my current job. Before that, I was with employers for 6 years, 1 year, and 4.5 years (going backwards in time). The one-year job was one year long by design, I.e. the time limit was inherent to the position.
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amother




Bronze
 

Post  Thu, Jan 16 2020, 2:06 pm
City job. 14 years.
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amother




Smokey
 

Post  Thu, Jan 16 2020, 2:30 pm
9 years. I was happy until about 2 years ago. It’s getting worse and worse and very toxic. Will start looking for a new job although it sucks because I don’t need need another stress in my life and the job has perks
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amother




Burlywood
 

Post  Thu, Jan 16 2020, 2:39 pm
6 years. Hate my job from 2 years ago when I realized how unappreciated and dead end the job really is. Looking for something for the past few months. Previous job 10 years and left due to trying to cut down on travel. Starting fresh at my stage is so hard. I want to settle down somewhere.
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amother




Seafoam
 

Post  Thu, Jan 16 2020, 2:59 pm
My first real job out of college - 5 years, until I moved to a different state.
I am currently in my second job and have been working here for 13.5 years (bli ayin hora)
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Chayalle




 
 
 
 

Post  Thu, Jan 16 2020, 3:03 pm
amother [ Beige ] wrote:
22 years.

Which means I've been working for close to 30. Long than many imothers have been alive.

Retirement is still a loooong way off!


Me too - I've been working at my current job for 22 years B"H B"AH.

I met a former coworker some time ago and he told me I will do well in retirement B"EH because I've been with the company for so long (they have a pension plan and it's based on years of service.).

That would be nice!
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