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Making Aliyah when older

 
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amother




OP
 

Post  Tue, Jun 30 2020, 12:05 pm
Hi - I'm thinking about Aliyah. I've always been Tzioni, was raised with going to the NY Israel Day Parade and going to Bnei Akiva groups.

Now at 50 years old, widowed, kids all married, I want to make aliyah and start fresh.

Husband did not leave any life insurance money, so I'd be going with not much in savings. I would need to rent something small, and I would still need to work. I'm a teacher, I those are a dime a dozen in Israel. How difficult will it be to find work? Maybe I have transferable skills?

How feasible is that? Should I take the chance? I could live near a sister in RBS, but I don't want to depend on her. Living near her would give me a sense of security, but truly I would be starting over on my own in a new country.

How much money do you think I need as a security cushion? Here they say to have 3 months worth of income in your savings. How much would that be in Israel?

Any helpful ideas are welcome, thanks!
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shabbatiscoming




 
 
 
 

Post  Tue, Jun 30 2020, 1:23 pm
All I will tell you is that my parents made aliyah as they were turning 60. It is doable.
If you have a teacher's certificate and can speak hebrew, Im sure you will be able to find a job.
RBS A has a large 50 + community.
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mandksima




 
 
 
 

Post  Tue, Jun 30 2020, 1:56 pm
English teachers and tutors are always needed. It could be RBS has more than enough but you could travel to Ashdod or somewhere nearby for work. Here, many hire English tutors to help children of Anglos get up to par with reading and writing like an anglo born overseas or Israelis hire them to help their children make up a level to be where their Israeli peers are. Some need bagrut test help.

I see older women working in maon daycare a lot.

Would you consider a roommate? That might help your budget and getting acclimated. Or moving in with someone elderly and being a caregiver with light duties in exchange for a room and access to kitchen. It doesn't have to be for good but a decent way to start out. This will save on expenses but without it, my guess is that you'll need maybe 6000 shekels a month for just yourself. You get a certain amount when making aliyah to help make whatever savings you have stretch more.
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amother




Seafoam
 

Post  Tue, Jun 30 2020, 2:01 pm
I don't have practical advice, just wanted to give you some encouragement. I'm impressed by your get up and go, and wish you the best of luck!!
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amother




Mauve
 

Post  Tue, Jun 30 2020, 2:05 pm
You have the same questions as I have. I would love to one day make Aliya. I am a little, but not much, younger, and am not there yet as I still have one in HS. I feel that I have no transferable marketable skills as I am not a teacher.
Maybe one day

Wishing you hatzlacha.
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FranticFrummie




 
 
 
 

Post  Tue, Jun 30 2020, 2:14 pm
Oooh, do you want to be my neighbor? I made Aliyah 5 years ago, right after my 50th birthday. I just turned 55.

I'm in Beit Shemesh, ask me anything!
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amother




Taupe
 

Post  Tue, Jun 30 2020, 2:36 pm
amother [ OP ] wrote:
I'm a teacher, I those are a dime a dozen in Israel. How difficult will it be to find work? Maybe I have transferable skills?



Not a dime a dozen if you are a native English speaker and want to teach English. Especially if you have basic Hebrew. You would be in major demand in many areas.

Do you have a degree and a teaching diploma? Check to see that your certifications will be accepted in Israel. Also check if they will recognize your past teaching experience.

You could be earning a decent salary if the answer to all of the above is yes.

Are you ok with living far away from your grandchildren though? Think it through before you make such a big move.
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FranticFrummie




 
 
 
 

Post  Tue, Jun 30 2020, 2:42 pm
Don't just look at teaching in a school.

Private tutors can make a LOT of money, and a lot of Israelis want their kids to be really fluent in English. Most kids graduate high school with barely 4th grade reading and writing skills.

Anglos want their kids to grow up with proper English skills as well.

I'm a nanny for a family of native Spanish speakers. My Spanish is rusty, and my Hebrew is almost non existent. They want me to speak primarily English to their daughter. Last year she was 3, and almost spoke 3 languages. She just turned 4, and I am constantly amazed at how fast she is picking up English, even little phrases that are so cute!
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amother




Taupe
 

Post  Tue, Jun 30 2020, 2:57 pm
FranticFrummie wrote:
Don't just look at teaching in a school.

Private tutors can make a LOT of money, and a lot of Israelis want their kids to be really fluent in English. Most kids graduate high school with barely 4th grade reading and writing skills.

Anglos want their kids to grow up with proper English skills as well.

I'm a nanny for a family of native Spanish speakers. My Spanish is rusty, and my Hebrew is almost non existent. They want me to speak primarily English to their daughter. Last year she was 3, and almost spoke 3 languages. She just turned 4, and I am constantly amazed at how fast she is picking up English, even little phrases that are so cute!


Yes, private tutors can make a lot of money. In my city, it's about 110 NIS per hour to tutor a high school student, but in Tel Aviv it can go up to 250 NIS.

However, most people won't hire you as a private tutor for high school unless you have experience in the high school bagrut system. And most parents aren't willing to pay 110 nis for someone to tutor a 10 year old (yes, there are exceptions, especially in very affluent areas).

In any case, tutoring is not a steady job. It's an extra. I know lots of teachers who make tons from tutoring on the side (especially those who tutor groups). But it's not a reliable form of income at all. It's a side job for extra.

A teacher gets paid 12 months a year, no matter what. Now with corona etc, most people I know are not tutoring at all.
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ora_43




 
 
 
 

Post  Tue, Jun 30 2020, 4:15 pm
It's really hard to say how difficult it would be to find work because of the unique situation right now. It's still not clear how hard coronavirus is going to hit the Israeli economy, and which parts will be most affected.

A few months ago, I would have suggested jobs in writing (technical writing or marketing), editing, and tutoring as alternatives to teaching.

Although don't dismiss teaching so quickly. Good teachers aren't easy to find. The main issues would be that schools would want you to speak at least some Hebrew, and that some Israeli classrooms can be tough (it really depends where you're teaching).

I think you might be in a good position to make aliya. Coming alone is hard because it has the potential to be quite lonely, but OTOH, it provides so much flexibility, which can be very helpful when it comes to looking for work. You could work evenings, or move to a different city. You're probably also able to get by with fairly little money for a while.

But I would try to either wait a few months and see how the economy is doing, or else come with the understanding that you'll live very frugally for the first few months and be pretty flexible about work. Not "sure, I'll work in terrible conditions" flexible, but like, "customer service at a call center? OK, I can do that until I find a job in a school," flexible.
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amother




Lilac
 

Post  Wed, Jul 01 2020, 4:59 am
English teacher here. Just a few points on our current situation here;
- Israeli kids can be brutal. It helps you have teaching experience but the 'cultural adjustment' takes time. Secular schools are comparatively more difficult to teach in than religious. Haredi schools tend to only accept their own graduates (even when they're worse teachers).
- you need a high level of Hebrew to teach. I've found those who don't tend to have more behavioral issues with their students and also basic issues of kids not understanding their explanations
- it's not such an easy time at the moment. Job searches are via phone, people have very little time and patience for 'cold call' job searchers. I only got a placement because the principal was the sister in law of a close friend. And I'm a native speaker in her late 20s with a first class honors English BA, teaching cert from an Israeli uni etc
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amother




Taupe
 

Post  Wed, Jul 01 2020, 6:00 am
amother [ Lilac ] wrote:
English teacher here. Just a few points on our current situation here;
- Israeli kids can be brutal. It helps you have teaching experience but the 'cultural adjustment' takes time. Secular schools are comparatively more difficult to teach in than religious. Haredi schools tend to only accept their own graduates (even when they're worse teachers).
- you need a high level of Hebrew to teach. I've found those who don't tend to have more behavioral issues with their students and also basic issues of kids not understanding their explanations
- it's not such an easy time at the moment. Job searches are via phone, people have very little time and patience for 'cold call' job searchers. I only got a placement because the principal was the sister in law of a close friend. And I'm a native speaker in her late 20s with a first class honors English BA, teaching cert from an Israeli uni etc


English teacher here also. I agree with most of your points. But - secular schools are not at all necessarily more difficult to teach in. I actually find them easier than dati schools, definitely if we are talking dati boys' schools. It all depends on which school and the types of students it attracts, but IME many secular schools are uber professional, and there's more authority all round.

You do need very good Hebrew to teach. Agreed.

Job searches - I always cold call. Just send my resume directly to the school. It is easier once you are 'in the system' and have experience; they look at you differently.
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amother




Aqua
 

Post  Wed, Jul 01 2020, 6:16 am
Good for you Op!

Wishing you all the hatzlocha!!!

So lucky you have a sister living there -- she probably will be beyond thrilled to have you join them and help you get acclimated and learn the ropes.

As independent as you are this is normal in the beginning and a huge advantage. And probably her pleasure!
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