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Gluten free Challah recipe- no eggs, nuts, Potatoes, gluten
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HakarasHatov




 
 
 
 

Post  Wed, Sep 23 2020, 9:06 am
Anyone have a good challah recipe that’s gluten free without eggs nuts or potatoes and no chemicals (processed ingredients).

I have gluten free oats. I could get some coconut flour or rice flour. Ideally something that looks like challah.

I’ve heard seltzer helps “rise” bread does this work for gluten free recipes too? Thanks in advanced
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anonymrs




 
 
 
 

Post  Wed, Sep 23 2020, 9:38 am
I have a recipe. If you bump this again later, I can post it.
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HakarasHatov




 
 
 
 

Post  Wed, Sep 23 2020, 5:07 pm
How do I bumb
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hello321




 
 
 
 

Post  Wed, Sep 23 2020, 10:20 pm
Im interested too
Bump
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ChanieMommy




 
 
 
 

Post  Wed, Sep 23 2020, 10:23 pm
Here,there was a similar thread

https://www.imamother.com/foru.....97544
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ChanieMommy




 
 
 
 

Post  Wed, Sep 23 2020, 10:27 pm
HakarasHatov wrote:
Anyone have a good challah recipe that’s gluten free without eggs nuts or potatoes and no chemicals (processed ingredients).

I have gluten free oats. I could get some coconut flour or rice flour. Ideally something that looks like challah.

I’ve heard seltzer helps “rise” bread does this work for gluten free recipes too? Thanks in advanced

Is this about real allergies, or are those just diet fads?

If you want to minimize gluten, I recommend rye flour.

You can make sourdough bread from rye flour, but it will be hard to shape it into challot, but you can make loaves...

Or if you have glutenfree oats, I suggest making something like matzot, flat breads...

Or there is glutenfree bread to buy, with treated flour...
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HakarasHatov




 
 
 
 

Post  Wed, Sep 23 2020, 11:58 pm
ChanieMommy wrote:
Is this about real allergies, or are those just diet fads?

If you want to minimize gluten, I recommend rye flour.

You can make sourdough bread from rye flour, but it will be hard to shape it into challot, but you can make loaves...

Or if you have glutenfree oats, I suggest making something like matzot, flat breads...

Or there is glutenfree bread to buy, with treated flour...
these are REAL allergies indeed. The other thread had nice ideas but it looks like many had something allergenic in it for us. Will use those if I have to piece something together and experiment. I’m ideally looking for a simple recipe with basic ingredients (processed ingredients/chemicals could cause a reaction). No nuts,potatoes eggs, gluten.. or in other words yes oats, oils , yeast, baking soda, baking powder, water, coconut, rice, tapioca, honey, sugar, salt etc...I’ll start with “flat bread” if need be, just want something edible for shabbos.
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FranticFrummie




 
 
 
 

Post  Thu, Sep 24 2020, 3:15 am
ChanieMommy wrote:
Is this about real allergies, or are those just diet fads?


That's not nice. People with allergies don't deserve to be questioned, and people on diets are usually miserable and will try anything. Either way, OP wants help.

She needs a recipe, not judgement, and she shouldn't have to explain why.

I find it hard to make challah even with traditional ingredients. I can only imagine how hard it would be with allergies or sensitivities to things that are so basic to the recipe. It's like asking how to make a stir fry without vegetables, meat, or soy products!

All of my attempts to do keto and gluten free baking have been disasters that were so bad that my dog wouldn't even eat them.

OP, you may have to ask your rabbi if you can use mezanot on kiddush, or just skip that all together and make kiddush on wine or grape juice alone. I wish you lots of luck, and a happy Shabbos.
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ChanieMommy




 
 
 
 

Post  Thu, Sep 24 2020, 3:36 am
HakarasHatov wrote:
these are REAL allergies indeed. The other thread had nice ideas but it looks like many had something allergenic in it for us. Will use those if I have to piece something together and experiment. I’m ideally looking for a simple recipe with basic ingredients (processed ingredients/chemicals could cause a reaction). No nuts,potatoes eggs, gluten.. or in other words yes oats, oils , yeast, baking soda, baking powder, water, coconut, rice, tapioca, honey, sugar, salt etc...I’ll start with “flat bread” if need be, just want something edible for shabbos.

Sorry, I did not mean to offend you.

The question was about: do you have to make sure to exclude gluten at 100%?

Because rye is the cereal that contains least gluten (3%), and it is possible to make very tasty bread (not challot) with exclusively rye flour and water. I extensively described how to do it in the other thread.

However, if you have to go to 0% gluten, I have no good news for you about Challot, because Gluten is what holds the dough together and allows the dough to be structured, to rise and challot to be shaped. Hence my suggestion to stick to flatbread.

As I mentionned in the other thread, in my country there is kosher glutenfree bread which you can finish baking yourself, but of course, this is a comercial product which will contain additives.

I also asked whether those were real allergies because if you are allergic to gluten, I suppose you are patur from the mitzwa of making ha motzi, so you could eat anything your diet allows to have "something edible" for shabbat.

You could try gluten-free matzot, they have been available for some time now.

I am a bit disappointed at the way you dismiss my suggestions from the other thread, there is one receipe for oat sourdough bread, only with oats, water and salt (from whole oats)...


Last edited by ChanieMommy on Thu, Sep 24 2020, 3:44 am; edited 1 time in total
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ChanieMommy




 
 
 
 

Post  Thu, Sep 24 2020, 3:43 am
FranticFrummie wrote:
That's not nice. People with allergies don't deserve to be questioned, and people on diets are usually miserable and will try anything. Either way, OP wants help.

She needs a recipe, not judgement, and she shouldn't have to explain why.

This was not about judgement, this was about inquiring how to find a way to help her, as I stated above.

I was very active in helping the other poster who had the same question, but sometimes people do not really know what they want, and that is rather daunting when you are trying to help.

for example, in this case, it is clear that people with allergies are patur from making hamotzi on shabbat, so there is really no need to wrack their or my brain.
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HakarasHatov




 
 
 
 

Post  Thu, Sep 24 2020, 7:09 am
ChanieMommy wrote:
Sorry, I did not mean to offend you.

The question was about: do you have to make sure to exclude gluten at 100%?

Because rye is the cereal that contains least gluten (3%), and it is possible to make very tasty bread (not challot) with exclusively rye flour and water. I extensively described how to do it in the other thread.

However, if you have to go to 0% gluten, I have no good news for you about Challot, because Gluten is what holds the dough together and allows the dough to be structured, to rise and challot to be shaped. Hence my suggestion to stick to flatbread.

As I mentionned in the other thread, in my country there is kosher glutenfree bread which you can finish baking yourself, but of course, this is a comercial product which will contain additives.

I also asked whether those were real allergies because if you are allergic to gluten, I suppose you are patur from the mitzwa of making ha motzi, so you could eat anything your diet allows to have "something edible" for shabbat.

You could try gluten-free matzot, they have been available for some time now.

I am a bit disappointed at the way you dismiss my suggestions from the other thread, there is one receipe for oat sourdough bread, only with oats, water and salt (from whole oats)...
I recognize that you meant no harm, and you just wanted to know what type of help I wanted. Guess I have to get better at coordinating tone and caps. I smile because I always get a reaction , usually it’s “wow, what can they eat”. It’s for my dear child, who is a good sport but always gets left out of Hamotzi. Anything gluten free and store bought has eggs or potatoes. If anyone does know where I can buy store bought with few additive please share I’ll look into the few additives to see if they are a problem. I did see the sourdough recipe but I thought it called for rye (could you copy and paste the receptor here. Ideally I’m looking for a recipie that I have to change the least as someone mentioned this is difficult baking territory , especially since I’m not a baker. Again I’m ok with flat bread or muffins if necessary. ... also ok with something like a rice bread or something with little /no oats , as it’s just a substitute for a child.
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ChanieMommy




 
 
 
 

Post  Thu, Sep 24 2020, 7:19 am
HakarasHatov wrote:
I recognize that you meant no harm, and you just wanted to know what type of help I wanted. Guess I have to get better at coordinating tone and caps. I smile because I always get a reaction , usually it’s “wow, what can they eat”. It’s for my dear child, who is a good sport but always gets left out of Hamotzi. Anything gluten free and store bought has eggs or potatoes. If anyone does know where I can buy store bought with few additive please share I’ll look into the few additives to see if they are a problem. I did see the sourdough recipe but I thought it called for rye (could you copy and paste the receptor here. Ideally I’m looking for a recipie that I have to change the least as someone mentioned this is difficult baking territory , especially since I’m not a baker. Again I’m ok with flat bread or muffins if necessary. ... also ok with something like a rice bread or something with little /no oats , as it’s just a substitute for a child.

I don't understand. You did not mention oats were forbidden???

I'm not sure making imitation challa is the best solution in this case. Maybe he would like an other treat the father gives out instead of the challa?

I am quite proficient at making rye bread, but I never tried the oat receipes I gave on the other thread. One user said she tried oat challa and did not like the texture... The most importnt factor will be that your child likes it. Why do you think the child would not be satisfied with either a treat or glutenfree matzot...??? I suppose with matzot you could not go wrong...
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ChanieMommy




 
 
 
 

Post  Thu, Sep 24 2020, 7:24 am
Rye bread receipe.

Until video, it's about starter, if you want to go straight to the receipe, look after the video.

To make sourdough starter will take you about 10 days, but you can bake the first breads after 4 days or so.

Take three spoons of rye flour and three spoons of lukewarm water. Mix into a dough. cover with a cloth and let it out for 15-24 hours (depends on the room temperature, the warmer, the quicker, the colder, the slower) The best temperature is 24-28°C.

After 15-24 hour, add three spoons of rye flour and three spoons of water, mix again, cover with cloth, leave outside for 15-24 hours (just approximately one day, doesn't have to be exact).

Now you have to double the flour quantity every day. So you take 6 spoons of flour the 3rd day, 12 the fourth day, etc... or, when you feel you have too much, you could also take away half of your starter and add the same quantity of flour you added the day before...

After 4 days, you can start baking, but it is good to go on feeding the sourdough every day for about 10 days, so that the bacteria culture becomes stronger. Over shabbat, you should keep the starter in the fridge, since you cannot feed it on shabbat... or else you would have to feed your starter right before and right after shabbat.

After 10 days or so it is enough to feed the starter once a week, the day before you want to bake... So you will keep the starter in the fridge, feed it, leave it out for about 12 hours, and put it back to the fridge till next week.

Here is a video that shows you how to make a starter with wheat flour, and it is exactly the same with rye flour. You do not need to add anything, the sourdough bacteria are already in the grain, you just have to give them good conditions to grow. For the start of the starter whole grain rye flour might be better, since the bacteria are mainly in the husks..



Here is the receipe for the rye sourdough bread.

Take either 100% regular rye or 1/2 regular rye flour, 1/2 whole grain rye flour.

feed your starter. It has to be rye starter. Wait a few hours.
(starter must have been fed max. 24h before you start)

take 1 spoon (10g) rye flour, 1 spoon lukewarm water, 1 mokkaspoon (1g) of starter. mix. cover with cheesecloth.
let rest for 7h on counter or over heater at about 24°C (not too hot, over 40°C kills starter)

Add 1 cup of rye flour, 10 spoons of lukewarm water, just enough to make a very dry dough.
Let rest for 9h at 24°C

Add 3 cups of rye flour, 1-2 cups of lukewarm water, mix.
Let rest for 3h at 24°C

Add 4 cups of flour, 2-3 cups of lukewarm water, 1 tablespoon salt, cumin, mix for 10 minutes, shape into loaves, let proof for 1h.

Perheat oven (and baking sheet) at 250°C, add water for steam,
Bake for 20 min at 250°C, then reduce heat to 200°C and bake for 25 more minutes.

Take out, let cool on a rack.
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amother




Linen
 

Post  Thu, Sep 24 2020, 7:48 am
HAMotzi gfoats challah

I do 1 oz oat flour and 3 oz seltzer. Add salt etc. Bake at 400 for 40 minutes
Hatzlacha.
Comes out flat in pan amd divide but then not for lechem mishna. I would like to try in muffin cups so to have shleimim for lechem mishna.

This doesmt taste great. I’ll check another recipe I have later. But I assume it has almond flour.

If you can google theres great gf bread recipes online
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HakarasHatov




 
 
 
 

Post  Thu, Sep 24 2020, 8:52 am
ChanieMommy
Thanks for the recipie, we have tried other treats and substitutions but they are not equal and it doesn’t always work to give dried fruit instead of challah. Gluten free matzah has potatoes in it. If anyone knows of a just oats brand please tell me.
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HakarasHatov




 
 
 
 

Post  Thu, Sep 24 2020, 8:53 am
ChanieMommy wrote:
Rye bread receipe.

Until video, it's about starter, if you want to go straight to the receipe, look after the video.

To make sourdough starter will take you about 10 days, but you can bake the first breads after 4 days or so.

Take three spoons of rye flour and three spoons of lukewarm water. Mix into a dough. cover with a cloth and let it out for 15-24 hours (depends on the room temperature, the warmer, the quicker, the colder, the slower) The best temperature is 24-28°C.

After 15-24 hour, add three spoons of rye flour and three spoons of water, mix again, cover with cloth, leave outside for 15-24 hours (just approximately one day, doesn't have to be exact).

Now you have to double the flour quantity every day. So you take 6 spoons of flour the 3rd day, 12 the fourth day, etc... or, when you feel you have too much, you could also take away half of your starter and add the same quantity of flour you added the day before...

After 4 days, you can start baking, but it is good to go on feeding the sourdough every day for about 10 days, so that the bacteria culture becomes stronger. Over shabbat, you should keep the starter in the fridge, since you cannot feed it on shabbat... or else you would have to feed your starter right before and right after shabbat.

After 10 days or so it is enough to feed the starter once a week, the day before you want to bake... So you will keep the starter in the fridge, feed it, leave it out for about 12 hours, and put it back to the fridge till next week.

Here is a video that shows you how to make a starter with wheat flour, and it is exactly the same with rye flour. You do not need to add anything, the sourdough bacteria are already in the grain, you just have to give them good conditions to grow. For the start of the starter whole grain rye flour might be better, since the bacteria are mainly in the husks..



Here is the receipe for the rye sourdough bread.

Take either 100% regular rye or 1/2 regular rye flour, 1/2 whole grain rye flour.

feed your starter. It has to be rye starter. Wait a few hours.
(starter must have been fed max. 24h before you start)

take 1 spoon (10g) rye flour, 1 spoon lukewarm water, 1 mokkaspoon (1g) of starter. mix. cover with cheesecloth.
let rest for 7h on counter or over heater at about 24°C (not too hot, over 40°C kills starter)

Add 1 cup of rye flour, 10 spoons of lukewarm water, just enough to make a very dry dough.
Let rest for 9h at 24°C

Add 3 cups of rye flour, 1-2 cups of lukewarm water, mix.
Let rest for 3h at 24°C

Add 4 cups of flour, 2-3 cups of lukewarm water, 1 tablespoon salt, cumin, mix for 10 minutes, shape into loaves, let proof for 1h.

Perheat oven (and baking sheet) at 250°C, add water for steam,
Bake for 20 min at 250°C, then reduce heat to 200°C and bake for 25 more minutes.

Take out, let cool on a rack.
I though rye bread had gluten, do you have a oat recipie
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HakarasHatov




 
 
 
 

Post  Thu, Sep 24 2020, 8:57 am
amother [ Linen ] wrote:
HAMotzi gfoats challah

I do 1 oz oat flour and 3 oz seltzer. Add salt etc. Bake at 400 for 40 minutes
Hatzlacha.
Comes out flat in pan amd divide but then not for lechem mishna. I would like to try in muffin cups so to have shleimim for lechem mishna.

This doesmt taste great. I’ll check another recipe I have later. But I assume it has almond flour.

If you can google theres great gf bread recipes online
thanks linen, this is a great start, I can use coconut flour or something else instead of almond.
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amother




Oak
 

Post  Thu, Sep 24 2020, 8:59 am
I never tried
But maybe you can make matza meal rolls using oat matzah and an egg replacer like flax
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HakarasHatov




 
 
 
 

Post  Thu, Sep 24 2020, 9:02 am
Does anyone know the characteristics of alternative flour when baking?

For example oat flour is heavy and doesn’t rise. What else

Coconut flour , tapioca flour, rice flours, and oat flour are my options so far. I was thinking to try half oat half coconut or rice.

? Does it taste nutty? Does it fluff? does it “rise”? Is one more comparable to wheat flour than another? What else?
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HakarasHatov




 
 
 
 

Post  Thu, Sep 24 2020, 9:04 am
Oat matzah is allergenic for us, has poratoes
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