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Gluten free Challah recipe- no eggs, nuts, Potatoes, gluten
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HakarasHatov




 
 
 
 

Post  Thu, Sep 24 2020, 9:07 am
Btw thank you everyone, all info is helpful to me sorting out my options. Hug Hug . I’m not a baker so just trying to get as much info as possible for this difficult task.
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anonymrs




 
 
 
 

Post  Thu, Sep 24 2020, 9:17 am
Gluten free egg free challah

1 1/4 cup warm water
1 Tbsp instant yeast
1/4 cup honey

Mix together and let sit for ten minutes.

In a large bowl or mixer
240 gram oat flour
140 gram tapioca flour
40 gram brown rice flour
1/3 cup oil
2 tsp salt
1 tsp Apple cider vinegar
In separate bowl, mix together 1/4 cup water and 1 tsp guar or xanthan gum and add to big bowl.
Mix, then add yeast mix into dough. Knead eor few min.

Form into rolls. Rise for 1 hour. Bake at 375 for 30 minutes.
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HakarasHatov




 
 
 
 

Post  Thu, Sep 24 2020, 7:13 pm
Any others
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strawberry cola




 
 
 
 

Post  Thu, Sep 24 2020, 10:28 pm
There is a company called Baum's that manufactures a gluten-free oat challah. It is available in health food stores and perhaps from the company itself, or on Amazon.
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amother




Amber
 

Post  Wed, Sep 30 2020, 1:50 pm
I can't understand the need to make a bread or challah substitute... a katan has not chiyuv anyway, and someone with such health problems is of course patur from making hamotzi... so I can't understand why you go to such lengths and make so many other people go to such lengths to do something that is absolutely not required...
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ChanieMommy




 
 
 
 

Post  Wed, Sep 30 2020, 2:07 pm
Try this. This is a sicilian treat containing only chickpea flour, water, salt, fried in oil....
It's not hamotzi, but this is not what it's about anyways...

It might be that the same procedure could work for oatflour too...although I think oats contain gluten, more than rye...

You will also find demonstrations on youtube... look for "panelle"

https://www.mangiabedda.com/pa.....tters

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Frumme




 
 
 
 

Post  Wed, Sep 30 2020, 2:22 pm
amother [ Amber ] wrote:
I can't understand the need to make a bread or challah substitute... a katan has not chiyuv anyway, and someone with such health problems is of course patur from making hamotzi... so I can't understand why you go to such lengths and make so many other people go to such lengths to do something that is absolutely not required...


Having a gluten allergy doesn't preclude you from making hamotzi on Shabbos and yomim tovim because you can make gluten free bread from oats which qualifies for hamotzi. On Pesach, people with gluten issues eat oat matzah (GF oat flour and water). Yes OP's child is just that, a child, but eventually s/he will be an adult, so why not figure out something now so it won't be a problem later?
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amother




Amber
 

Post  Wed, Sep 30 2020, 2:25 pm
Frumme wrote:
Having a gluten allergy doesn't preclude you from making hamotzi on Shabbos and yomim tovim because you can make gluten free bread from oats which qualifies for hamotzi. On Pesach, people with gluten issues eat oat matzah (GF oat flour and water). Yes OP's child is just that, a child, but eventually s/he will be an adult, so why not figure out something now so it won't be a pro blem later?


Did you read the list of all the proposals that were made here and that OP rejected?

So if it's just about the child not feeling excluded, give him a little chocolate or candy, or a piece of banana, for heaven's sake!
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amother




Copper
 

Post  Wed, Sep 30 2020, 2:31 pm
I've learned that I need to readjust my expectations :-)
Challah/bread made without gluten and eggs doesn't rise or fluff like traditional wheat challah/bread. It tastes decent, especially fresh or reheated (gets stale quicky) but it is definitely different.
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Frumme




 
 
 
 

Post  Wed, Sep 30 2020, 2:33 pm
amother [ Amber ] wrote:
Did you read the list of all the proposals that were made here and that OP rejected?


I wasn't commenting on that. I was just explaining why it isn't so clear cut to say "it's not necessary to go to such lengths." That's something that needs to be discussed with a rav. If OP isn't happy with what was posted here, that's a side point.

--

OP, you can try this recipe:
https://thebananadiaries.com/v.....read/

Google vegan oat bread and there are a bunch of recipes without potatoes and anything with nuts can be replaced with things like sunflower seeds or the like.

If you want it challah shaped, most frum groceries sell a silicone mold in the shape of a challah meant for loose doughs like oat breads. From what I remember, you flip it out of the mold 1/2 or 2/3 of the way through the baking process so the top can brown up.
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ChanieMommy




 
 
 
 

Post  Wed, Sep 30 2020, 2:54 pm
If oats are allowed and hamotzi is not really require, I would turn to granola bars with oats and honey, cranberries, chocolate chips.... Or also sesamy bars... just honey and sesamy and bake it barr moulds


Or also:
roast sesamy seeds and combine with big dates in mortar! that's excellent...
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amother




Bisque
 

Post  Wed, Sep 30 2020, 6:51 pm
amother [ Amber ] wrote:
I can't understand the need to make a bread or challah substitute... a katan has not chiyuv anyway, and someone with such health problems is of course patur from making hamotzi... so I can't understand why you go to such lengths and make so many other people go to such lengths to do something that is absolutely not required...


I am not the op but I’m a fellow mom of allergic children. One child in particular has a whole laundry list of allergies and that precludes this dc from having challah. (No eggs, no wheat, no oats, spelt, rye etc) you can’t understand the need to make a challah substitute when the child isn’t chayav anyway, I’ll try to explain the reason why. At least in my child’s case, this dc has spent their entire life being different and not having the same food as everyone else, because they can’t. Not in school, not in camp, not at home. I try to bring or send things for school events/treats that will be as equivalent as possible and I try at home as well, when possible. It is a very difficult thing for a child to go through, constantly being different or feeling like they’re missing out or being left out. For a long time my child was ok with it but as the years go by, it has become harder and harder for my dc and it bothers dc more and more. To the extent that I as a parent can minimize those sad feelings, I definitely try. So even though my child isn’t chayav in hamotzi, why should they have to feel left out and feel bad because of something that they have no control over? Why shouldn’t I try my hardest to find adequate substitutes so that dc doesn’t have to feel sad and different or left out? And no, a granola bar or cookie or what not is not a good substitute for this week after week. Sometimes dc has to just face the reality that they are different and that’s the way life is but if I can soften the blow of this burden, I most certainly will try! I’m sorry that you have this challenge too, OP and I hope that you can find something that works.
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amother




Amber
 

Post  Wed, Sep 30 2020, 7:10 pm
amother [ Bisque ] wrote:
I am not the op but I’m a fellow mom of allergic children. One child in particular has a whole laundry list of allergies and that precludes this dc from having challah. (No eggs, no wheat, no oats, spelt, rye etc) you can’t understand the need to make a challah substitute when the child isn’t chayav anyway, I’ll try to explain the reason why. At least in my child’s case, this dc has spent their entire life being different and not having the same food as everyone else, because they can’t. Not in school, not in camp, not at home. I try to bring or send things for school events/treats that will be as equivalent as possible and I try at home as well, when possible. It is a very difficult thing for a child to go through, constantly being different or feeling like they’re missing out or being left out. For a long time my child was ok with it but as the years go by, it has become harder and harder for my dc and it bothers dc more and more. To the extent that I as a parent can minimize those sad feelings, I definitely try. So even though my child isn’t chayav in hamotzi, why should they have to feel left out and feel bad because of something that they have no control over? Why shouldn’t I try my hardest to find adequate substitutes so that dc doesn’t have to feel sad and different or left out? And no, a granola bar or cookie or what not is not a good substitute for this week after week. Sometimes dc has to just face the reality that they are different and that’s the way life is but if I can soften the blow of this burden, I most certainly will try! I’m sorry that you have this challenge too, OP and I hope that you can find something that works.


I don't know, I don't have experience with this particular problem...

But why should the child feel disadvantaged when you explain that he is patur from hamotzi and that he can have a chocolate, or a fruit, or a granola bar instead of hamotzi?

I think it's important to clearly explain and perceive that he is patur from the mitzva, and to relish in the food the child can eat, rather than perceiving the situation, as OP expresses herself, that there is "nothing edible" for the child, just because the child can't have challa...

Also, how do you play this? Is the whole family condemned to eat the less-than savory oat challa? And if everyone eats fluffy flour/yeast challa and allergic child gets flat, not so savory oat challa, would this child not feel different and left out?

So why not say: challa is not for you, but you can have x, y, z???

It's just like vegans eating meat-imitations - I don't get it... If you're vegan, relish the richness of fruit and veggies earth proposes you... why would you want imitation meat.

Why would this child want imitation challa?
Why would this child feel less left out with imitation challa?
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amother




Bisque
 

Post  Wed, Sep 30 2020, 7:57 pm
amother [ Amber ] wrote:
I don't know, I don't have experience with this particular problem...

But why should the child feel disadvantaged when you explain that he is patur from hamotzi and that he can have a chocolate, or a fruit, or a granola bar instead of hamotzi?

I think it's important to clearly explain and perceive that he is patur from the mitzva, and to relish in the food the child can eat, rather than perceiving the situation, as OP expresses herself, that there is "nothing edible" for the child, just because the child can't have challa...

Also, how do you play this? Is the whole family condemned to eat the less-than savory oat challa? And if everyone eats fluffy flour/yeast challa and allergic child gets flat, not so savory oat challa, would this child not feel different and left out?

So why not say: challa is not for you, but you can have x, y, z???

It's just like vegans eating meat-imitations - I don't get it... If you're vegan, relish the richness of fruit and veggies earth proposes you... why would you want imitation meat.

Why would this child want imitation challa?
Why would this child feel less left out with imitation challa?


Since you don’t have experience with this, it’s hard to try and explain it. It’s probably also easier to explain in person than online Smile. I’ll try once more with a bit more detail-

My dc is not too far off from being chayav in mitzvos, firstly, so the not chayav part doesn’t work because the child is at an age and stage where these things are important even if it’s not a mamash chiyuv. This child has been allergic to many, many, many, many (when I start listing it to people they are in disbelief and don’t know what the child eats to survive) things their entire life. That’s a life of always being different, as I said previously. The child relishes each new food that they are allowed to try and it’s actually a big lesson for my entire family to not take things for granted and appreciate all that we can have. The child appreciates all that they can eat and each time a new thing is tried and able to be added to the diet it is super exciting (and I cry because it’s so emotional to see the child get to add on and enjoy and feel hopeful).

In terms of having a different challah, yes, it’s different but it’s still somewhat of an equivalent so even though it’s not the same, it still helps the child feel more a part. Yes, it’s different, that’s the way it has to be but to the extent that there can be a good replacement, it’s very helpful. Given that this child isn’t so young, saying “Here have a _______ (cookie, fruit, whatever)” is not going to be a good equivalency or distraction or consolation.

Vegan is a totally different situation. It can not even be compared. They’re choosing to do that. I’m not going to get into it.

Good luck OP.
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amother




Amber
 

Post  Wed, Sep 30 2020, 8:07 pm
amother [ Bisque ] wrote:
Since you don’t have experience with this, it’s hard to try and explain it. It’s probably also easier to explain in person than online Smile. I’ll try once more with a bit more detail-

My dc is not too far off from being chayav in mitzvos, firstly, so the not chayav part doesn’t work because the child is at an age and stage where these things are important even if it’s not a mamash chiyuv. This child has been allergic to many, many, many, many (when I start listing it to people they are in disbelief and don’t know what the child eats to survive) things their entire life. That’s a life of always being different, as I said previously. The child relishes each new food that they are allowed to try and it’s actually a big lesson for my entire family to not take things for granted and appreciate all that we can have. The child appreciates all that they can eat and each time a new thing is tried and able to be added to the diet it is super exciting (and I cry because it’s so emotional to see the child get to add on and enjoy and feel hopeful).

In terms of having a different challah, yes, it’s different but it’s still somewhat of an equivalent so even though it’s not the same, it still helps the child feel more a part. Yes, it’s different, that’s the way it has to be but to the extent that there can be a good replacement, it’s very helpful. Given that this child isn’t so young, saying “Here have a _______ (cookie, fruit, whatever)” is not going to be a good equivalency or distraction or consolation.

Vegan is a totally different situation. It can not even be compared. They’re choosing to do that. I’m not going to get into it.

Good luck OP.


But can't you go see a rav with her and have the rav explain to her that she is ptura from eating challa or bread, because hashem wants her to live and be healthy, just like a person with diabetes would not have to fast on yom kippur, just like a hemophiliac (before there were coagulation factors) would not have to have a brith?

Because I have a feeling that there is no clear concept of this being patur, that people try to make the impossible possible, even when halacha does not aks it from them...
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HakarasHatov




 
 
 
 

Post  Wed, Sep 30 2020, 8:25 pm
amother [ Bisque ] wrote:
I am not the op but I’m a fellow mom of allergic children. One child in particular has a whole laundry list of allergies and that precludes this dc from having challah. (No eggs, no wheat, no oats, spelt, rye etc) you can’t understand the need to make a challah substitute when the child isn’t chayav anyway, I’ll try to explain the reason why. At least in my child’s case, this dc has spent their entire life being different and not having the same food as everyone else, because they can’t. Not in school, not in camp, not at home. I try to bring or send things for school events/treats that will be as equivalent as possible and I try at home as well, when possible. It is a very difficult thing for a child to go through, constantly being different or feeling like they’re missing out or being left out. For a long time my child was ok with it but as the years go by, it has become harder and harder for my dc and it bothers dc more and more. To the extent that I as a parent can minimize those sad feelings, I definitely try. So even though my child isn’t chayav in hamotzi, why should they have to feel left out and feel bad because of something that they have no control over? Why shouldn’t I try my hardest to find adequate substitutes so that dc doesn’t have to feel sad and different or left out? And no, a granola bar or cookie or what not is not a good substitute for this week after week. Sometimes dc has to just face the reality that they are different and that’s the way life is but if I can soften the blow of this burden, I most certainly will try! I’m sorry that you have this challenge too, OP and I hope that you can find something that works.

Thanks Bisque

Yes my child can eat few foods. And I don’t mind putting forth a little effort to help dc feel little more included. I’m looking for options ( that he is not allergic to). I’m seeking as much info as possible, as I’m not an experienced baker. So far a few good options were suggested and I tried one so far. ( he ate it fresh, but was too hard after I refrigerated it, so I just have to warm that one every time) I plan to try a few more over time.

With my post I’m hoping to build on the shoulders of giants that have experience with baking challah (or flat bread) with the same or similar limitations.With that said, keep the recipes and tips and trick coming if you know any. Don’t go crazy trying to solve my problem more than you want to, just share what you want. Wink
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HakarasHatov




 
 
 
 

Post  Wed, Sep 30 2020, 9:57 pm
Amber,

Ill try to help you understand from my point if view. Im not looking for a substitute because I have to, Im looking because I want to. I've seen similar breads were good, so it doesnt seem impossible for me to do, tricky yes, trial and error yes, but I'm ok with that. We all choose what we want to spend our energy on and what brings us happiness. I've seen some people spend so much time baking desearts and learning new recipies, because thats what they like. . That doesnt intrest me. I probably spend less time in the kitchen than them. Others read, or learn, or talk to friends, or shop, or garden. Its all about what we prefer.

For me I want to give to my dc bread because it seems possible and not so far fetched (maybe I'm dreaming, and if its impossible Ill give it up). I do tell him that he is allergic that he can not have and he accepts it just as if I said its not kosher. But he still would want if he wasnt allergic just like a kid would want gummie bears if they were kosher. when I am able to find something "new" he can eat, he gets so excited and happy and thrilled. This is worth it for me to try.

Btw our house is 95% hypoallergenic, we mostly dont bring in outside food, and we all eat the same hypoallergenic food. but we dont suffer through it. since Hashem gave us this obsticle we have been forced to eat very healthy. we are greatful for this, I dont think we would have been so knowledgable about health and having good habbits if it were not for this.

When it does involve halacha and its a grey area where the mitzvah can be done but I could probably get a psak to be mutar, I would still choose to do the mitzvah (unless the mitzvah is too hard and comsuming and takes away from other mitzvahs), because mitzvahs were given to us for our own benifit, and mitzvahs bring us closer to Hashem. I'm not perfect, I do have weaknesses, mistakes and failures, but when its my choice, this is why I choose mitzvot.
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sarahmalka




 
 
 
 

Post  Wed, Sep 30 2020, 10:18 pm
OP I don't have a recipe sorry but wanted to say a few tips regarding GF baking. Coconut flour tends to make baked goods a little more dry and crumbly so if using that, add extra liquid. Coconut also does have a fairly strong flavor to some people. Tapioca starch (not flour) is a direct substitute for potato starch, I find. Mixing oat flour with white and brown rice flour would be a good mild flavor, also tapioca flour is mild (but hard to find). Chickpea flour is nice to add nutritionally but it can have a rather intense flavor so don't make it the primary part of your flour mix until you know if your DC likes it. Rice flour is much more neutral. GF bread without egg is going to be more dense and grainy. You'll probably have the best luck making rolls in a mold or in muffin tins, since your dough is going to be runnier than regular bread dough. Add fun toppings like sauteed onions, or cinnamon-sugar, to make the rolls even more tasty. I just learned a regular challah recipe with vanilla extract and that was great! If you're on Facebook I think there's a Gluten free Kosher group.
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amother




Mauve
 

Post  Wed, Sep 30 2020, 11:19 pm
Op, can you use any form of egg replacement (e.g. flax eggs, etc? )
Regarding gluten, does your child have a gluten intolerance/celiac or is it a wheat allergy? Because if it's just a wheat allergy maybe other grains are ok. My DC is allergic to wheat but not allergic to rye.
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HakarasHatov




 
 
 
 

Post  Wed, Sep 30 2020, 11:22 pm
What are flax eggs, I would try flaxseed on a day I have ample time (after yontif Smile )
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