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allthingsblue




 
 
 
 

Post  Wed, Jan 13 2021, 11:56 am
keym wrote:
The minhag is not cholent, rather something hot. So cholent, soup, hot pastrami, meatballs. Anything cooking in a crockpot, blech, warmer overnight follows the minhag.
We've skipped all hot food in the summer- just cold fish, deli, salads. But my husband will make sure to have a tea or coffee for something hot.


Great point about the coffee! I don't know why I never thought of that before!
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Blessing1




 
 
 
 

Post  Wed, Jan 13 2021, 11:57 am
yamaha wrote:
The actual recipe for cholent (beans, barley, meat, potatoes) has ashkenazi origin, but the idea of eating something hot is accepted across the board. I imagine it had to do with which foods were available at the time in that region.


Right, minhag is to eat something hot. I thought cholent is a chassidish food.
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ra_mom




 
 
 
 

Post  Wed, Jan 13 2021, 12:10 pm
The cholent in Poland was called Yapsuk (not yapchik as people refer to it today), made with grated potatoes and meat. Beans were not used traditionally. No eggs were added, it wasn't a kugel.
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keym




 
 
 
 

Post  Wed, Jan 13 2021, 12:15 pm
allthingsblue wrote:
Great point about the coffee! I don't know why I never thought of that before!


Aylor
Mine said that we really should have the urn or pump pot in the house, and my husband shouldn't just get a coffee in shul.
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allthingsblue




 
 
 
 

Post  Wed, Jan 13 2021, 12:17 pm
keym wrote:
Aylor
Mine said that we really should have the urn or pump pot in the house, and my husband shouldn't just get a coffee in shul.


We have an urn and I have a hot coffee every week regardless of weather. Coffee number 1 needs to be hot for me; the rest of the coffees can be iced Smile
So it's good to know that I don't need to stress about hot food on shabbos.
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amother




Pewter
 

Post  Wed, Jan 13 2021, 12:19 pm
Not sure why they keep continuing this column. It was cute maybe the first few times, but now it has become completely repetitive, same type of jokes and they only give one of the recipes. Could someone please tell me the purpose of this column at this point?
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amother




Cyan
 

Post  Wed, Jan 13 2021, 12:23 pm
amother [ Pewter ] wrote:
Not sure why they keep continuing this column. It was cute maybe the first few times, but now it has become completely repetitive, same type of jokes and they only give one of the recipes. Could someone please tell me the purpose of this column at this point?


I agree. Also, they all end by saying how much they appreciate their wives. It's so scripted it just annoys me.
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amother




Pink
 

Post  Wed, Jan 13 2021, 12:23 pm
ra_mom wrote:
The cholent in Poland was called Yapsuk (not yapchik as people refer to it today), made with grated potatoes and meat. Beans were not used traditionally. No eggs were added, it wasn't a kugel.


Thety were two separate dishes. Cholent she yapchik. Both served in Poland. My aunt would sometimes make it years ago when it wasn't popular yet. I never ever heard about it from anyone else till years later. I actually thought she made it up or it was only specific to her family. She did pronounce it yapchik, not yapsuk, and I imagine it might have to do with haavarah. She learned it from her mother who came from Losdz. Our family is from Galicia, so only familiar with the dish through her. It also was different a bit than what people call yapchik today. It is not a potato kugel with some flanken in it, but it has much more of a cholenty consistency. I followed a recipe for it in my crock pot, and I forgot to strain and squeeze out liquid from the grated potato's like the recipe said, and it came out just like hers. Yum.

Also, while Cholent of beans meat and barley is Ashkenazi, the sefardim also traditionally served a similar stew like dish for chamin on Shabbos day. They probably varied between different recipes though. Like, I know Persians have a few different choresh (stew) dishes they might rotate through.
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ra_mom




 
 
 
 

Post  Wed, Jan 13 2021, 12:26 pm
amother [ Pink ] wrote:
Thety were two separate dishes. Cholent she yapchik. Both served in Poland. My aunt would sometimes make it years ago when it wasn't popular yet. I never ever heard about it from anyone else till years later. I actually thought she made it up or it was only specific to her family. She did pronounce it yapchik, not yapsuk, and I imagine it might have to do with haavarah. She learned it from her mother who came from Losdz. Our family is from Galicia, so only familiar with the dish through her. It also was different a bit than what people call yapchik today. It is not a potato kugel with some flanken in it, but it has much more of a cholenty consistency. I followed a recipe for it in my crock pot, and I forgot to strain and squeeze out liquid from the grated potato's like the recipe said, and it came out just like hers. Yum.

Also, while Cholent of beans meat and barley is Ashkenazi, the sefardim also traditionally served a similar stew like dish for chamin on Shabbos day. They probably varied between different recipes though. Like, I know Persians have a few different choresh (stew) dishes they might rotate through.

My grandmother was from the Lodz area as well. The yapsuk is creamy and delicious. We don't strain any liquid from the potatoes but we don't add any water either. We make it for pesach.
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amother




Plum
 

Post  Wed, Jan 13 2021, 2:12 pm
Funny, my kids were just talking about Man with a Pan this past week. We all agreed the food is overly fancy and unrealistic, and the articles are boring because nothing ever goes wrong. We all agreed they should come to our house for a little drama (dh rarely cooks and when he does, has had many disasters!).

ETA: And the articles make me feel vaguely resentful because anybody can make Shabbos once, and of course it will be a fun and novel experience. Now try making Shabbos every single week for decades. The men in these articles are always enjoying leafing through cookbooks and constructing an elaborate menu with multi-step recipes, and that is NOT what making Shabbos is like unless you're well to do or cooking is your hobby. For me I have a million other things I'm juggling and making Shabbos can be HARD.
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imaima




 
 
 
 

Post  Wed, Jan 13 2021, 3:02 pm
amother [ Wheat ] wrote:
I'm chassidish, so our meals are pretty traditional, but I agree that not every inyan is a halacha, and everyone has different traditions.

I do take exception to the no-chulent part because as far as I know it's a pretty strong minhag from way back to eat something warm Shabbos day to differentiate us from the Tzedukim/Karaim. But it doesn't say anywhere that it has to include beans, barley, flanken, and/or potatoes.

I also think the column is repetitive. How many times can I read that he started on Wed or Thurs and that his wife and kids liked it, and that this recipe he got from XYZ.


I think hot water from the urn works too, instrad of cholent.
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blessedflower




 
 
 
 

Post  Wed, Jan 13 2021, 4:15 pm
My MIL is very traditional and will make every week shabbes the exact same food. But guess what? Weekday lunch is also always typical foods, like shnitzel, puree, stuffed cabbage, ...
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dydn11402




 
 
 
 

Post  Wed, Jan 13 2021, 4:28 pm
I happen to find this column incredibly boring. A man cooking?? Stop the presses!! Why is this entertaining for anyone?
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cutestbaby




 
 
 
 

Post  Wed, Jan 13 2021, 4:33 pm
amother [ Cyan ] wrote:
I agree. Also, they all end by saying how much they appreciate their wives. It's so scripted it just annoys me.

ITA it's getting a little Rolling Eyes
If they're looking to revamp it I would love to see a column where they challenge the cook to make shabbos according to a certain theme, or not using 1 specific ingredient that everyone needs...
Or only with a stovetop and not an oven
Or in the microwave, come to think of it!
Or you only have a certain amount of time to do everything, like Chopped style
Writers if you're reading this listen up Wink
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amother




Violet
 

Post  Wed, Jan 13 2021, 5:38 pm
bananas4bananas wrote:
ITA it's getting a little Rolling Eyes
If they're looking to revamp it I would love to see a column where they challenge the cook to make shabbos according to a certain theme, or not using 1 specific ingredient that everyone needs...
Or only with a stovetop and not an oven
Or in the microwave, come to think of it!
Or you only have a certain amount of time to do everything, like Chopped style
Writers if you're reading this listen up Wink


I love this idea bananas. A man making Shabbos, contrary to what they'd have us believe, isn't such a big deal. How about making Shabbos with no onions? With no fresh produce at all? Making Shabbos for someone allergic to eggs? Allergic to eggs and wheat? Making Shabbos for a family of 8 in an hour? Making Shabbos with only 2 burners, 2 pots, one knife and a peeler but no oven, no food processor, no mixer or any other kitchen supplies? The possibilities are endless and the results could be entertaining.
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PinkFridge




 
 
 
 

Post  Wed, Jan 13 2021, 9:30 pm
amother [ Violet ] wrote:
Funny I never thought the meals were not traditional enough. What always looks strange to me is how many different things they make. My meals are much simpler than theirs. Shout out to the mishpacha editors here joining PinkFridge. Somehow you never give us the recipe I wanted from the man with a pan.


To be fair, they do say which cookbooks many of the recipes come from.
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Aylat




 
 
 
 

Post  Wed, Jan 13 2021, 9:42 pm
amother [ Violet ] wrote:
I love this idea bananas. A man making Shabbos, contrary to what they'd have us believe, isn't such a big deal. How about making Shabbos with no onions? With no fresh produce at all? Making Shabbos for someone allergic to eggs? Allergic to eggs and wheat? Making Shabbos for a family of 8 in an hour? Making Shabbos with only 2 burners, 2 pots, one knife and a peeler but no oven, no food processor, no mixer or any other kitchen supplies? The possibilities are endless and the results could be entertaining.


I agree. My DH is a much better cook than me, and we often split shabbat prep between us - sometimes we both cook, sometimes he cooks and I clean. (Sometimes I do everything because he is on-call in the hospital.) The whole premise of the article is weird to me.

Great ideas! Just after we made aliya we were living in a teeny apartment with no real kitchen, just a sink, fridge, and a borrowed 2-ring electric burner. That would be a more interesting article. Or when we rented a holiday home in the country for a week with extended family and kashered the kitchen and made Shabbat there. Lots of cool scenarios possible.
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amother




Pink
 

Post  Wed, Jan 13 2021, 9:54 pm
ra_mom wrote:
My grandmother was from the Lodz area as well. The yapsuk is creamy and delicious. We don't strain any liquid from the potatoes but we don't add any water either. We make it for pesach.


Yup. Exactly how I made it. And it was Pesach. My aunt used to make it Shabbos mevorchim. It's a really nice contrast to our Galicianer potatoless cholent. (My father even convinced my husband, who thinks all things Hungarian are automatically better, that the Galicianers are right about the no potato comment cholent).

Back to the original topic, I also find it kind of boring. My traditional chassidish husband does about half the Shabbos cooking and is capable of making the entire thing. I have never make Cholent in my life. On a weekly basis he makes the Cholent, farfel and salmon. Sometimes meat or chicken. Basically, the Friday cooking. Thursday night, I make gefilte fish, lukshin, soup and eggs. (My mother makes us kugel). Ony general, my husband is the more naturally talented and intuitive cook, but it's busier during the week and rarely makes supper.
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amother




Peach
 

Post  Wed, Jan 13 2021, 10:25 pm
I hear where the OP is coming from. DH and I grew up heimish with traditional foods and now we live in a community that has a big mix, so I've seen it done both ways. We do not consider ourselves heimish, but we still enjoy traditional foods.
I stick to a pretty traditional menu for Shabbos, and I go all out for Yom tov, making all types of food. I keep Shabbos meals traditional mainly because my kids like the Shabbos foods and it keeps it to a certain structure. If I so much as add an ingredient to my soup or cholent my kids complain, "why mess with a good thing?"
When I have guests I will often add to the menu. Don't forget, these traditional foods came to be because our ancestors cooked what was available. So Polish people have a cholent that is heavy on the potatoes, whereas Hungarians will have more meat in their cholent since they were more affluent. Sefardim had access to many more spices, so their menu is spicier and contains rice and chickpeas.
Here in America, we have access to do amny foods all year round and we have invented our own "traditional foods" such as apple cobbler, deli roll, sushi salad, quinoa salad, carrot muffins..all of which you may find at a traditional meal.
But here's what I learned about "traditional foods" . Many of them actually have some meaning to it. There's a book I once came across talking about the "taamei haminhagim" of the foods we eat. So challah is made in braids with six strands to symbolize the 12 loaves of bread on the Shulchan. (2 challos per meal, 6x2). Kugel is meant to be served round, k'ugel- like a circle, I think to symbolize the circle of life. And there is a deep meaning to the eggs with onions, though I can't remember what. Of course gefilte fish became a jewish food because it was a way to avoid borer, and the Cholent has a strong halachic basis. Since the karaiim didn't believe in maintaining a fire over Shabbos, they ate only cold food by day. It became a thing that if someone didn't eat chamin by day they were suspected of being a karaite. So many people are makpid to eat cholent for that reason, though you can fulfill that by drinking a hot drink.
Yom tov also has traditional foods which chassidim are makpid about, and there are various reasons given to explain why we eat these things.
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cbsp




 
 
 
 

Post  Wed, Jan 13 2021, 10:36 pm
amother [ Peach ] wrote:
... And there is a deep meaning to the eggs with onions, though I can't remember what.


It's the onion that's important. The egg is there as the "carrier." I don't remember what the significance is - can anyone enlighten us?
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