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Corrugated plastic counter covers
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amother
OP


 

Post Thu, Mar 30 2023, 5:04 pm
DH bought several sheets, I guess that's how we're covering the counters.

Any tips or hints? Is there a wrong way to do this? I am going to need to measure and cut them down to size, do you have a method for this? Do I cut out a hole for the sink or do I just go on either side and put foil in front and back? Are both sides the same or is there a top or bottom? Do I want the corrugated lines going side to side or front to back? Does it matter? Does anything matter? What mistakes have you made that I should try not to?

We are hoping to reuse these from year to year.
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amother
DarkPurple


 

Post Thu, Mar 30 2023, 5:36 pm
Mark with a sharpie where you want to cut, and cut it with a sharp razor.
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seeker




 
 
    
 

Post Thu, Mar 30 2023, 5:38 pm
So funny, this is my post and I don't remember clicking anonymous. Whatever.

Came back to ask whether I should make sure to finish kashering the sink and stovetop before putting these on, or if it doesn't matter. Since DH will be doing the kashering and I want to get a move on my roles.
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ra_mom




 
 
    
 

Post Thu, Mar 30 2023, 5:41 pm
If you use big sheets of corrugated plastic and cut to size, you don't need to use any tape to hold them down at all.

I have learned to purchase the biggest sheets available for the triangular corners of the counters/sinks and use a box cutter to cut as custom as possible. This way it's mostly big pieces that extend way past the corners and cover most of the counter space, and I don't need any tape. Comes out much neater this way and I have an easier time cooking, cleaning and wiping down.

I only use tape on the actual ends of the corrugated plastic, in order to seal the ends of the pastic pieces so food doesn't get in (but I don't tape down to the counter or to each other). This way they stay clean and I can keep them for a few years. They are a pain to cut custom but worthwhile because I can use for a few years (about 4). And when I need new ones, it is much easier to cut the second time around since I use the old one as my tracing base and it goes very quickly.

If you have the thinner counter depth sheets, you can still cut out the sink (sometimes between 2 pieces) and not have little pieces all taped together. It makes it more user friendly, but a bit harder to cut out.
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amother
NeonYellow


 

Post Thu, Mar 30 2023, 5:44 pm
seeker wrote:
So funny, this is my post and I don't remember clicking anonymous. Whatever.

Came back to ask whether I should make sure to finish kashering the sink and stovetop before putting these on, or if it doesn't matter. Since DH will be doing the kashering and I want to get a move on my roles.


I would wait until the sink is done because it usually makes a mess of water everywhere.
In terms of cutting it around the sink, last year I saw a cool life hack. Turn your phone light on and place it inside your sink facing up. Then put the corrugated plastic right over the sink and you will see the shape of the sink shining through. Trace with sharpie and cut!
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seeker




 
 
    
 

Post Thu, Mar 30 2023, 5:47 pm
What keeps them from sliding off the counter if you haven't used any tape? Confused. It's just resting on your counter and not going anywhere?

What do you mean by triangular corners? I was just getting to wondering what the best strategy is for corners. I was thinking rectangular would probably be best because of simplicity, but that's why I'm asking because I have no idea.

I didn't measure anything yet but it looks like what DH brought home is very big. So on that point I think we got something right... our counters themselves are not that big :-/
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ra_mom




 
 
    
 

Post Thu, Mar 30 2023, 5:52 pm
seeker wrote:
What keeps them from sliding off the counter if you haven't used any tape? Confused. It's just resting on your counter and not going anywhere?

What do you mean by triangular corners? I was just getting to wondering what the best strategy is for corners. I was thinking rectangular would probably be best because of simplicity, but that's why I'm asking because I have no idea.

I didn't measure anything yet but it looks like what DH brought home is very big. So on that point I think we got something right... our counters themselves are not that big :-/

If you have a huge 6 foot hard sheet on your surface, it doesn't move. Because it meets/hits the stove or the wall and that keeps it in place, while on the other side it meets the 2nd piece of huge plastic. It's all tight so it doesn't move around. The only piece that moves sometimes is the one I have at the end of the kitchen that's like a small square/landing spot of 2 feet by 2 feet (nothing on the other side to hold it in place).
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amother
Azure


 

Post Thu, Mar 30 2023, 5:53 pm
amother NeonYellow wrote:
I would wait until the sink is done because it usually makes a mess of water everywhere.
In terms of cutting it around the sink, last year I saw a cool life hack. Turn your phone light on and place it inside your sink facing up. Then put the corrugated plastic right over the sink and you will see the shape of the sink shining through. Trace with sharpie and cut!


Lol
I was so excited with that tip last year.

Well I tried it today and totally didnt work.
It didnt take into account my taps plus, my sink insert wouldnt fit ontop of it.

I guess it could work if you have a totally flat area near your sink , AND you also cut out space for your taps.8
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ra_mom




 
 
    
 

Post Thu, Mar 30 2023, 5:56 pm
For the sinks, I start to cut out a square smaller than I need for the sink. This allows me to start and slip it over the faucet to get it in the right position and can them work slowly to trace and place the cuts exactly where they are needed.

It is possible to use different small pieces on either side of sink, but you need to take and things get wet around the sink all YT. When I don't have to use tape, I can just lift, tape, pit back.

There were some years where the tracing and cutting was too hard and we used tape and all survived. Just wanted to mention that. 😊
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amother
Opal


 

Post Thu, Mar 30 2023, 6:07 pm
How do you clean the covers before you use them for the first time? I usually place them on the floor and spray with Windex and wipe dry. There has to be an easier method. Ty
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pause




 
 
    
 

Post Thu, Mar 30 2023, 6:19 pm
We're using our corrugated counter tops for the 5th year now. The first year I made them by rolling out roll of long shelf paper onto the counter and marking the size and shape of the cutouts on that. I then used those sheets of paper to trace the layout onto the countertops. I worked on the freshly cleaned floor. It was a lot of work that first year, but they fit beautifully and are a pleasure to use now.

We also use them for the backsplash.

Before packing them away, label them in the back with a permanent marker for easy installation next year.
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seeker




 
 
    
 

Post Thu, Mar 30 2023, 6:50 pm
ra_mom wrote:
If you have a huge 6 foot hard sheet on your surface, it doesn't move. Because it meets/hits the stove or the wall and that keeps it in place, while on the other side it meets the 2nd piece of huge plastic. It's all tight so it doesn't move around. The only piece that moves sometimes is the one I have at the end of the kitchen that's like a small square/landing spot of 2 feet by 2 feet (nothing on the other side to hold it in place).

That's really interesting to know!
Alas I have no 6-foot stretches of counter so I guess I won't find out.
So what's the best way to tape it down assuming that I can't get the measurements perfect enough for it to hold itself in place? (I don't think it could anyway, the sink is flush to the same height as the counter, unless I'm including the sink and cutting out a hole for it? Is that what I should do, make it from wall to wall with a hole for the sink?)

Trying to estimate what I have... It's like maybe 4-5 ft from wall to sink, then 2-3 ft from sink to the corner where the counter turns but of course the counter keeps going, just the edge stops there, and then after you turn the corner it's maybe 1.5 ft to the stove, then an average size stove, then a really little strip of counter then an awkward gap then the fridge. Would not mind covering the awkward gap with the plastic!

On a different wall I have a longer stretch of counter but it's open toward the doorway on one side so no wall preventing cover from sliding off, you're sure the size alone keeps it steady?! I guess I need to see it to believe it.
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seeker




 
 
    
 

Post Thu, Mar 30 2023, 6:54 pm
pause wrote:
We're using our corrugated counter tops for the 5th year now. The first year I made them by rolling out roll of long shelf paper onto the counter and marking the size and shape of the cutouts on that. I then used those sheets of paper to trace the layout onto the countertops. I worked on the freshly cleaned floor. It was a lot of work that first year, but they fit beautifully and are a pleasure to use now.

We also use them for the backsplash.

Before packing them away, label them in the back with a permanent marker for easy installation next year.

Wow. I'd love for my floors to be clean enough for me to do this with confidence. Maybe I'll clean the dining room table first and lay things out there.

When you say the shape of cutouts you mean like the sink? Trying to figure out what needs to be cut out. Do you cut the sink out of a solid sheet or do you just have the counter piece go up until the sides of the sink and then do the front and back separately?
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ra_mom




 
 
    
 

Post Thu, Mar 30 2023, 7:09 pm
seeker wrote:
That's really interesting to know!
Alas I have no 6-foot stretches of counter so I guess I won't find out.
So what's the best way to tape it down assuming that I can't get the measurements perfect enough for it to hold itself in place? (I don't think it could anyway, the sink is flush to the same height as the counter, unless I'm including the sink and cutting out a hole for it? Is that what I should do, make it from wall to wall with a hole for the sink?)

Trying to estimate what I have... It's like maybe 4-5 ft from wall to sink, then 2-3 ft from sink to the corner where the counter turns but of course the counter keeps going, just the edge stops there, and then after you turn the corner it's maybe 1.5 ft to the stove, then an average size stove, then a really little strip of counter then an awkward gap then the fridge. Would not mind covering the awkward gap with the plastic!

On a different wall I have a longer stretch of counter but it's open toward the doorway on one side so no wall preventing cover from sliding off, you're sure the size alone keeps it steady?! I guess I need to see it to believe it.

I have 3 feet of counter space in some areas and still they hold in place.

Btw the reason I love having 2 of the 4 ft deep sheets for the corners is to help keep everything in place. I cut out a lot of those large sheets but they allow me to have a L shaped corner in the center with some 2 ft wide extensions on each side. It's like one huge sheet. Then I add the 2 ft wide sheets running forward on the straight parts of the counter.

If you have a large stretch of counter with nothing at the end, I don't think you have to worry about the sheet falling off. Most of the time you'll have something resting on the counter. But you can use counter tape, painters tape or masking tape if you need.
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seeker




 
 
    
 

Post Thu, Mar 30 2023, 7:12 pm
[quote="[url=https://www.imamother.com/forum/viewtopic.php?p=6825393#6825393]ra_mom
Btw the reason I love having 2 of the 4 ft deep sheets for the corners is to help keep everything in place. I cut out a lot of those large sheets but they allow me to have a L shaped corner in the center with some 2 ft wide extensions on each side. It's like one huge sheet. Then I add the 2 ft wide sheets running forward on the straight parts of the counter.
[/quote]
Aaaaahhh having such a hard time visualizing what you're trying to communicate, and I'm pretty sure it's me and not you... 2 of the 4 ft deep sheets for the corners? huh? L shaped corner in the center...??

My sink is in middle of my counter, how do you deal with that? Do you use a whole sheet and cut a sink shape hole in it or do you do one sheet up to the sink and then another one on the other side of the sink?
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nicole81




 
 
    
 

Post Thu, Mar 30 2023, 7:28 pm
I use painter's tape (blue tape). It comes off the easiest and is residue free.

I like cutting them with wire cutters, I find it easier than with a razor or box cutter.

Definitely kasher before if you can, otherwise you'll be left with mildewy counters underneath. It's ok, you can clean them after pesach, but easier not to.

I also like covering my counters first with foil, this way if I turn the plastic upside down the next year, I know it never touched the chometz surface. Also, if I cut a millimeter or more too short, between the foil and the tape, nothing is touching the counter underneath.

I do foil all around the back of the sink area. It's too much of a pain for me to cut holes in the plastic.

Also, I tape pieces together with weatherproofing tape in the places I need to cut and attach multiple pieces.

Last tip- I mark the plastic with a sharpie to note where each piece belongs. I did it on the underside as I laid the pieces down this year bc I needed new plastic. But in the past I've put them down and marked the surface.

Also, they're totally reusable for many years. Make sure you always cut on cutting boards and put hit pans on a cooling tray or table or pot holder or else they will melt!
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amother
Olive


 

Post Thu, Mar 30 2023, 7:38 pm
You can duct tape the ends, I used contact paper cut into strips to decorate mine, I even do little cute cutouts in the middle (you can tell I don't have enough work to do...)

You can also use that to attach two pieces if it was too hard to cut one big L or something. Advantage of doing that is you can fold it for storage.

We leave ours out in the sun (daven for no rain for a couple of days after Pesach!) to make sure they're really dry before storing. Of course if you have kids running around with chometz this may be too nerve-wracking...

We bought rolls of some thinner flat plastic that we cut to fit the back splashes etc. We also used them to line cabinets but I've stopped doing that, I have one rolling cart I bring in, and pantry & plastic shelves in the room next to kitchen for the rest.

I try to organize what I need such as all baking supplies in one bin, just bring that to the counter to bake.

Tip for cutting (I have these supplies for other reasons, not sure worth to buy) I have a 2x4? or so self-healing mat, a metal ruler w cork back, & a linoleum/utility knife. You mark your material but then use your ruler to guide your knife, cutting on the mat.
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ra_mom




 
 
    
 

Post Thu, Mar 30 2023, 7:42 pm
seeker wrote:
Aaaaahhh having such a hard time visualizing what you're trying to communicate, and I'm pretty sure it's me and not you... 2 of the 4 ft deep sheets for the corners? huh? L shaped corner in the center...??

My sink is in middle of my counter, how do you deal with that? Do you use a whole sheet and cut a sink shape hole in it or do you do one sheet up to the sink and then another one on the other side of the sink?

Yes that's ideal. But if it's too hard, use 2 sheets and then just tape some scraps at the front and back sides of the sink.
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amother
Crimson


 

Post Thu, Mar 30 2023, 7:45 pm
Absolutely kasher first or you'll have water everywhere.

I tape the corrugated plastic down
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amother
Clear


 

Post Thu, Mar 30 2023, 9:18 pm
Regarding tape - if you are taping two pieces of corrugated to each other, use good quality strapping tape. It will not allow water to go through to the counter if you tape well.

If you decide to tape it to the counter, use the counter tape sold in hardware stores this time of year. That is the easiest to take off after pesach.

We always leave some plastic hanging off the edge of the counter (folded down) like a tablecloth. This really keeps liquid from going onto the counter. The way to do this is to leave the plastic a few inches deeper than your counter. Then using a razor, make a shallow cut in the corrugated plastic along the edge of your counter - cut the top layer only and then fold it over. Then you put strapping tape all along the fold so no water should enter into the plastic.

And the best way to keep these counters clean is to always cover with a plastic tablecloth while working on the counter.
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