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Forum -> Chinuch, Education & Schooling
Books with tone/sarcasm for little kids
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amother
OP


 

Post Tue, Feb 27 2024, 6:46 pm
Does anyone know any picture books that have sarcasm or time to help a preschool student detect meaning? Google isn't yielding any results for me
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Ridethewaves




 
 
    
 

Post Tue, Feb 27 2024, 10:41 pm
Dr suess (green eggs in ham) and most of his books.
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imaima




 
 
    
 

Post Tue, Feb 27 2024, 11:26 pm
amother OP wrote:
Does anyone know any picture books that have sarcasm or time to help a preschool student detect meaning? Google isn't yielding any results for me

That’s because most kids don’t fully understand sarcasm until 16 years of age
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amother
Mintcream


 

Post Tue, Feb 27 2024, 11:29 pm
Are you really expecting a preschooler to understand sarcasm? Let them be kids!!
I feel like once they understand sarcasm, their innocence is gone.
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amother
OP


 

Post Wed, Feb 28 2024, 3:13 am
The parent requested I address it because the child is unsure of how to comprehend the tone she hears when conversing. Child is very bright and very literal/black and white at the same time. I found a great simple story that was created for this but only one. If anyone has specific titles they know contain such lines, I'd appreciate it.
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amother
Phlox


 

Post Wed, Feb 28 2024, 3:18 am
Amelia Bedelia
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scintilla




 
 
    
 

Post Wed, Feb 28 2024, 3:18 am
Sarcasm isn't age appropriate for preschoolers... If you could be more specific about what they want it would be easier to help because sarcasm isn't something that should or would be in a preschool age book.
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amother
OP


 

Post Wed, Feb 28 2024, 3:26 am
Like if someone looks outside and sees rain and says "oh great it's raining" but tone and context indicate it's not great
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lucky14




 
 
    
 

Post Wed, Feb 28 2024, 3:37 am
amother OP wrote:
Like if someone looks outside and sees rain and says "oh great it's raining" but tone and context indicate it's not great


That’s normal for a preschooler to think you mean it literally. It is a hard concept for them.
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amother
OP


 

Post Wed, Feb 28 2024, 3:43 am
lucky14 wrote:
That’s normal for a preschooler to think you mean it literally. It is a hard concept for them.

Yes and no. The book I found said research shows kids pick it up between 4-7. This child is 6 and is struggling but very bright and can be taught.
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salt




 
 
    
 

Post Wed, Feb 28 2024, 4:20 am
amother OP wrote:
Yes and no. The book I found said research shows kids pick it up between 4-7. This child is 6 and is struggling but very bright and can be taught.


Continuous examples. Keep pointing out examples to the child, and he/she will get it.


There's a joke - child opens the door to her grandma and said "So good you came round to visit. Now my mother has absolutely everything she needs".
Turns out the child said to the mother "grandma just phoned to say she's coming round soon".
The mother muttered under her breath "that's all I need".
Smile
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amother
OP


 

Post Wed, Feb 28 2024, 4:43 am
salt wrote:
Continuous examples. Keep pointing out examples to the child, and he/she will get it.


There's a joke - child opens the door to her grandma and said "So good you came round to visit. Now my mother has absolutely everything she needs".
Turns out the child said to the mother "grandma just phoned to say she's coming round soon".
The mother muttered under her breath "that's all I need".
Smile

Of course continuous examples will help. But for explicit instruction, I feel a book would be best because it has illustrations and context. The child is on the spectrum and needs explicit instruction.
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amother
Wheat


 

Post Wed, Feb 28 2024, 4:50 am
Maybe Amelia Bedilia? It’s not exactly sarcasm but may work.
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amother
Honeysuckle


 

Post Wed, Feb 28 2024, 4:51 am
amother OP wrote:
Of course continuous examples will help. But for explicit instruction, I feel a book would be best because it has illustrations and context. The child is on the spectrum and needs explicit instruction.


I figured.

For this, the work is often about reading facial expressions. There are books, games, flashcards, computer programs etc that help drill kids on how people's faces look when they are feeling various things. You teach the kid to look at the face and read it the same way they hear the words. And then practice matching them up with them.

Having an example like the raining one that they learn well gives a reference point- "Oh, it's loke the raining thing- she looks sad while she says something happy." And the kid may not come to a point where they really understand yet when there is a direct contradiction between tone and worda, but they can realize it's not quite right and then either ask right away or hold onto it and ask later.

And yes, Amelia Bedelia is great for teaching about looking for non literal meankngs in general.
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amother
OP


 

Post Wed, Feb 28 2024, 4:52 am
amother Wheat wrote:
Maybe Amelia Bedilia? It’s not exactly sarcasm but may work.

I thought about those books. I find much of the double meanings are kind of outdated or not typical manner of speaking. It's also not so much about tone, which is what I want to focus on more.
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4pom




 
 
    
 

Post Wed, Feb 28 2024, 4:54 am
I’d focus on understanding inferencing rather than sarcasm in particular. There are loads of resources for that.
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amother
Honeysuckle


 

Post Wed, Feb 28 2024, 4:58 am
amother OP wrote:
I thought about those books. I find much of the double meanings are kind of outdated or not typical manner of speaking. It's also not so much about tone, which is what I want to focus on more.


I would go for faces before tone. It's a more objective thing to learn and eadier to teach. You can do tone, but it's much harder, and there are fully grown adults who still can't do it.
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Odelyah




 
 
    
 

Post Wed, Feb 28 2024, 5:27 am
I feel like Alexander and the Terrible Horrible No Good Very Bad Day might have sarcasm. Or maybe just grumpiness I don't remember exactly.
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anonymrs




 
 
    
 

Post Wed, Feb 28 2024, 5:31 am
The Clifford books might work. You need to use context clues (pictures) to fully decipher the meaning of the words in the book.
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sub




 
 
    
 

Post Wed, Feb 28 2024, 5:32 am
Try robert munch stephanie’s pony tail
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