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If u have an aspie kid, does the kid seem weird to you?
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amother




Silver


Post  Mon, Dec 31 2018, 4:18 pm
Mine doesn't. Does mean I'm off?
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amother




Blonde


Post  Mon, Dec 31 2018, 4:30 pm
What????
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zaq




 
 
 


Post  Mon, Dec 31 2018, 4:31 pm
No, it means you're used to your kid.
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amother




Mauve


Post  Mon, Dec 31 2018, 4:40 pm
Like zaq said, it just means you're used to your kid. Also, are there any siblings? My ASD child is the oldest, so I really didn't notice that things were off because I was a first time mom and had no basis for comparison. Now, with several younger, typically developing children, I can see the difference. Also, I don't think my son is weird. I think he's awesome. But I see why it's tough for him to fit in Sad
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amother




Rose


Post  Mon, Dec 31 2018, 4:44 pm
unfortunately my answer is yes and hes my oldest as well.
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amother




Lemon


Post  Mon, Dec 31 2018, 5:18 pm
No way! I love him too much!
But, yes, I do see he's different.
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amother




Denim


Post  Mon, Dec 31 2018, 5:25 pm
People with Asperger's aren't weird, they just have different ways of thinking. I don't have any kids with Asperger's, but I do know plenty and I don't think of them as weird.
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amother




Lilac


Post  Mon, Dec 31 2018, 5:28 pm
I know some kids with Asperger's who come across as weird, and some who come across as quiet/shy and introverted. I don't think there's a real rule about it -- it's very individual.
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amother




Red


Post  Mon, Dec 31 2018, 5:33 pm
amother wrote:
No way! I love him too much!
But, yes, I do see he's different.


I love my kid too, so much. And I still think he's weird.

You're liable to not think something is weird if you understand that aspect. Dh understands how ds's thoughts are too fast for him to organize them as he speaks. It drives me crazy. I understand how ds focuses and internalizes better with music and rhythm, especially while moving. This drives dh crazy.
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Violet123




 
 
 


Post  Mon, Dec 31 2018, 5:40 pm
I would not describe his as weird at all.
He has his things but he's so lovable and special and affectionate.
I love him so so much and many people do(iow not only because I'm his mother)
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amother




Brown


Post  Mon, Dec 31 2018, 6:26 pm
As opposed to popular opinion, aspergers doesnt equal socially off.
My son is on the spectrum and is well liked by his peers, but has a hard time keeping friends due to his black and white thinking, rigidity, lack of interest in things that interest others.
He is definitely a mpre challenging child to raise than my others, but he doesnt "seem off"
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amother




Jetblack


Post  Mon, Dec 31 2018, 6:54 pm
Yes, sometimes.
But I got used to his quirks, He's just my son now that's all
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amother




Mustard


Post  Tue, Jan 01 2019, 12:45 am
Yes.
And the older he gets (he's a young adult now) the more I see how different he is from his peers and how difficult it is for him to do the things that 'normal' kids his age are doing.
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amother




Aquamarine


Post  Tue, Jan 01 2019, 9:06 am
Sometimes he seems weird. But I think this has more to do with me than him. It's a struggle for me not to vigilantly watch out for weirdness. In other words, behaviors that my other kids might do that are quirky or silly don't strike me as weird, but with my ASD son they do strike me as weird. I work on this. For example, my ASD son (age10) has a little stuffed animal that he got as a baby that he still sleeps with. Objectively, I don't think this is so weird. He would never take it with him on a sleepover with friends or snuggle with it when friends sleep by us. He just still likes it. I know in my head that there's nothing wrong with this. It's actually kind of cute. But when I see him stroking his teddy's tail it just gives me the creeps. It shouldn't, but it does. I have this terrible refrain that runs through my mind: be normal, be normal, be normal. It's my anxiety talking, my fear for him. I know he doesn't need my fear. He needs me to believe in him. I try, but it's really hard.
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nicole81




 
 
 


Post  Tue, Jan 01 2019, 9:29 am
My asd kid definitely has certain rigidities and needs extra explanation with certain things, but she's also more social and "with it" than some of my neurotypical kids.

And besides, most of my kids are weird in their own ways. I am, too.
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amother




Sapphire


Post  Tue, Jan 01 2019, 9:30 am
Delete

Last edited by amother on Tue, Feb 12 2019, 2:21 am; edited 1 time in total
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amother




Oak


Post  Tue, Jan 01 2019, 10:35 am
Son on the spectrum didn’t stop talking all day about the fact his alarm rang at 6:59 instead of 6:57. He was so thrown off that I switched the time for his alarm to ring. (He can technically sleep until 7:10 and still be on time) He claims that if he wakes up at 6:57 he has a good day but if he wakes up at a different time his day will be bad.
A regular kid wouldn’t get so carried away....
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amother




Scarlet


Post  Tue, Jan 01 2019, 10:41 am
smileforamile wrote:
Am I the only one who objects to the name "Aspie"? I know it's a typical name, but IMO it sounds so nasty.


A lot of people who have Asperger's have claimed it for their own. I know people in wheelchairs who don't have a problem using the term "crippled". Everyone has the right to self define, whether it's based on race, or ability, or whatever. You can object in your head, but please don't say it out loud.

Back in the LiveJournal days, I remember a post in a fashion community, by a model who was of short stature. He referred to himself as a "midget". A whole bunch of politically correct average height people got very offended on his behalf. The model was offended that taller people felt like he needed protecting or defending. He asserted his right to be a dwarf, a midget, a little person, or a leprechaun.

Sorry, got off track. Yes, I do see Aspies and ASD people as different, but "weird" has a very negative connotation. Heck, I'm NT, but some people could call me weird. Wink
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amother




Floralwhite


Post  Tue, Jan 01 2019, 12:22 pm
smileforamile wrote:
Am I the only one who objects to the name "Aspie"? I know it's a typical name, but IMO it sounds so nasty.


I think its preferred to ASD (which could be a full blown autistic person in an institution, or someone with a brilliant mind and some quirks)
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amother




Chocolate


Post  Tue, Jan 01 2019, 12:58 pm
Yes he absolutely does seem weird to me but I love him and get a kick out of his “weirdness”.
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