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Any Reading Specialists out there?
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Tzippy323




 
 
 
 

Post  Fri, Oct 18 2019, 3:56 pm
You have received some excellent suggestions. I use a wonderful series that is colorful, motivating, and can be adjusted to the pace of the child. Check out words their way, the word study notebook. This comes at all levels and the kindergarten level is amazing.
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Nadja




 
 
 
 

Post  Wed, Nov 20 2019, 8:45 pm
Have your heard of "picture me reading"? I've used it often when I taught special education. It creates pictures to help with associations. It's a great program
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amother




Violet
 

Post  Wed, Nov 20 2019, 9:40 pm
#BestBubby wrote:
Hi, OP.

I don't believe in whole word. I've seen kids who memorized a bunch of words and then got stuck.

WW teaches bad habits - to look at the whole word like a picture - instead of looking at the letters to sound it out.

It is harder for me to teach a kid who got used to WW then a kid who never learned to read.

WW seems like it works....until it doesn't (Kid can't memorize any more).

Phonics is a slower process - but at the end you can READ.

I've taught kids with Down Syndrome to read with Phonics - emphasizing word families.


Agreed! To illustrate this point and potential long term effects, as I’m reading this post my husband just looked at his emails and said to me “it’s under reconciliation” I had to correct him and tell him the word is reconsideration.
He struggled in school and will often times look at a written word and not say the correct word. He was never taught correctly. This irks me because he’s actually very smart and articulate but when it comes to putting what he has to say on paper, I cringe when this happens.
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oohlala




 
 
 
 

Post  Wed, Nov 20 2019, 10:09 pm
I am a reading specialist. It sounds like you need to consult with a professional to design a plan that will address your child's specific needs. Make sure the approach includes phonics and phonemic awareness. Research has found that learning letter names is helpful, as it is found that students' rapid naming of letters is a predictor of later reading success. You might want to join a fb group called "Science of Reading--What I didn't learn in college." There are mostly professionals on it, but also moms of dyslexic kids and others with disabilities who are just trying to help their kids learn to read. I think there are a lot of educated and smart pple on the group who could give you good advice.
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